speed light Tag

I am amused these days when every product or service I see is preceded by the letter "i " in lower case. It is put there to suggest that the object is considered to be intelligent. I'm prepared to believe this, but would like to point out to the manufacturers that this does no good at all when the purchaser 's name starts with " D " for dumb. My first name is Dick...

Finally, someone has done it. The MagMod people have released the solution for portrait shooters in the wild. They have given us a softbox that makes sense. Strobists and event shooters have been getting presents in their professional stockings for years - flashes that operate wirelessly, light stands that really are light, softbox light modifiers that can be assembled in less than a day by a crew of RAAF airframe riggers...

Make two people happy - yourself and our accountant. Gather in, Canon enthusiasts who want to work with small, light cameras, lenses, and flashes but want to work in a sophisticated manner. We have a flash idea for you. The Canon  Speedlite EL 100 may not look like the brightest flash you have ever seen - it has a guide number of 26  - but it gives you a chance to think on different terms than just the old blast o' light from the camera position. We've all done that, and we 'll continue to do it when it serves a good purpose ( Note that the illustration shots were taken using a portable product studio and a blast o' light from the hot shoe of a Fujifilm camera. BO'L is fine when you need frontal illumination. ) but there are times when art or science needs more light from more directions. This is the principle of the studio flash set of strobes and the $6000 worth of reflectors, softboxes, and triggers. If you need 'em, we got 'em, and don't lets let...

Come to think of it, that catchy title would make an equally catchy product name. Thanks, Lastolite - send me one when you make it. But today's Lastolite product is the answer for both the run-and-gun people shooter who has to keep their speedlight on their camera and the more ambitious portraitist who can get the gun off  and onto a light stand. It's an adaptation of a classic idea but with a couple of new convenient twists. To start with, and this is common in all the Lastolite range of goods, it is well packaged. They build for people who are going to haul their gear thither and yon repeatedly - the working pro and enthusiastic amateur who do not baby the goods. Hence they tend to bag everything in sturdy nylon cases with big zippers. This case contains a folding softbox - one that sticks to the front of your speedlight. The construction is such that the sides fold flat and the thing collapses on itself, with no complex rigging of struts required. The interior is silvered and has arrangements for...

No, We're not talking about another footballer's romance or a North Korean threat - it's the Lastolite Ezybox Micro - possibly the lightest of the large diffusers for speed lights. Certainly one of the easiest to put on and off. Speed light diffusers have a long history - all the way from those rigid plastic panels that you clipped above the Metz 45-series hammerhead flashes in the 1970's through to the strobist craze five years ago. There were innumerable things that attached to your speed light with rubber bands and velcro straps. Nearly all of them worked and nearly all of them were a pain. The ones that went on easily, came off easily - usually when you moved your camera from horizontal to vertical. The ones that stuck tight needed a welder's degree to attach and an oxy torch to take off. And the matter of needing a diffuser in the middle of an event shoot meant that both of these possibilities could occur at the same time. The heavy ones strained the joints of the speedlights - you would have...

Here's one for current professionals, budding professionals, and professionals who have long since gone to seed. A wonderful product that will stop you from killing someone. You're doing an event - a school ball, a corporate dinner, a ceremony...

Idling away on the South Perth foreshore one evening, I was trying to think of a use for the Perth skyline. I mean, they've taken a lot of trouble putting lights on the buildings and all and it seems only courteous to take some sort of notice. Then I read further into the instruction booklet that came with the new Fujifilm EF X-500 electronic flash. The Fujifilm people make a reasonably good set of instructions and the flash itself is easy to master. The bit that intrigued me was the arrangement that could be made for multiple flashes. You have three decisions to make via the page buttons and the scroll wheel: a. Level of manual flash power. b. Number of flashes that you want to fire. c. Length of time over which you want to fire them. Each one of the flashes will record as a separate illumination in the final frame while the background will keep burning into the image. If you want to capture the movements of the subject cleanly, you need a black backdrop...