Lenses Tag

I cannot conceal this from you - I adore silver lenses. Whether the finish is chrome, paint, anodised aluminium, or solid sterling silver, I think these optics are absolutely superb. It is prejudice - I acquired a Leica Elmar 2.8 lens with a chrome M2 in 1970 and the experience influenced me ever after. There were some horrible silvers - the collapsible Elmar of the 1950's had a chromed barrel but painted focusing ring and this soon looked sad. There were plain aluminium lenses from East Germany like the Meyer ones from Görlitz that quickly became tawdry. But there were also the Planar and Distagon lenses that fronted the 500-series Hasselblads and they looked magnificent. In my own chosen brand they are also supplying some of their small primes in a chrome finish - 23mm, 35mm, and 50mm so far. I have even seen on-line examples of the Fujifilm 27mm f:2.8 in silver, though whenever it is listed it is sold out. I'll bet it was an exclusively Japanese product. Leica have never given up on the aesthetics of the silver lens. You...

I realise that "triad" is a word with different evocations in different societies. In this blog post I am linking it more to military policy than to secret societies. Not that military organisations aren't secret - but what they do can be deliberately made very public. The triad that the US employs for strategic defence depends upon three things - the USAF bombers, the ICBM's, and the US Navy's submarine-launched missiles. Heaven forbid that they will ever be used, but the fact that there are three delivery agencies means that enemies know that they cannot get away with it. Unfortunately the policy means that three times as much money and effort must be spent in research, development, acquisition, training, deployment, maintenance, etc. Three times as much national effort. No-one does this sort of thing successfully unless they are major organisations. Leica is one of those organisations. Not in defence, but in photographic optics. They operate a triad system as well: a. The M-mount for cameras. Pioneered in the 1950's this must be one of the most recognised pieces of camera engineering there is...

Simply because the Zeiss people have tried their hand at taking macro and close-up pictures. And they have found out what happens when you set an AF mechanism to work close-to. What happens is a perfect storm of confusion - right there in your hand. You can confirm this is you have a macro lens that has an AF mechanism incorporated into it. Several of the makers have done this , both in the DSLR and mirror-less divisions. The lenses that feature AF can be extremely good performers, but in certain circumstances you will never discover it. What you will learn is a whole new vocabulary...

We primed you with a post last Friday mentioning 15% off the price of Zeiss lenses at our Murray Street store but we cleverly did not tell you the actual prices - leaving you to search out the figures on our Camera Electronic store website or turn up at Murray Street and ask the staff. Either way will eventually show you that the 15% is a substantial saving...