Lenses Tag

A lot of people might think that the biggest lens they could ever get for their camera is the Sigma Super zoom - 200mm to 500mm f:2.8. That's the green zeppelin seen in the heading image. We got to see one in the shop a few years ago and it was certainly impressive. I was scared of it in case it rolled out of the case and onto my foot - I would be equally frightened of tripping over it due to the expense. Someone, somewhere needs one of these and if that someone is you, be prepared to search with your wallet. But you probably have a different scope to your needs - both physically and financially - and your upper limit lens may be quite a bit smaller. Many, many DSLR shooters have benefited from other Sigma lenses in the past, as well as the more expensive teles of the major body manufacturers. I even know an outdoor shooter who went through serial Sigmas, having dropped the original one off rocks at the seashore into the surf. Hooray for...

A friend of mine will forgive me for mentioning a visit to see his stash of photographic lenses this week - it has started me thinking that I can have too many lenses. I would not have thought this in my younger days - nor would I advocate it now for customers of Camera Electronic. I thought more lenses were necessary when I could not afford them, and now that they are available in abundance, it is the duty of every photographer to get more. Yet...

I don't mean how many times do you come into the shop and spend other people's money. We don't care. If it has Commonwealth Of Australia somewhere on the bill and you can see through the watermark, we'll take it. We have an equal-opportunity till. But how many times have you purchased a piece of equipment to satisfy someone else's desires? A client who demands a certain look or a club committee who awards only certain sorts of photos. How many times have you spent your money to please them? I confess that I used to do it. Someone said they needed a certain coverage or look and I beat my brains until I could figure out how to afford a lens that would do it. And I did it, and got paid, and then the fashion changed and no-one else ever wanted that style of shot. Wanna buy a fisheye lens, anyone? The only comfort in this was the fact that I could buy at a decent price and sell at a slightly lower one, and not drip too much blood in...

My friend Carlos was carefully putting fresh stock into the Sony display cabinet on the Camera Electronic sales wall this last week when I went in to find some interesting gear. So I carefully plucked a number of things away while he was busy - things that attracted my eye and gave me to ponder somewhat about Sony photographic products. Long-time readers will know that I do not shoot with Sony myself, but that doesn't mean I do not respect and desire their goods - just that I don't have enough spare money to run two systems of cameras and lenses. One Powerball, however...

But dry at the time I went outside the Murray Street Store. Sometimes you can luck it. The opportunity to try the new-to-me Nikon Z-fc was too good to miss, so I took the spare SD card out of the gadget bag and plugged it in. Thus was the point at which the Nikon muscle memory kicked in and I was able to dive into the menu and format it. That's not just bumpf. A lot of cameras operate on menus and instruction sets that have been devised by their own staff. They may have configured the things quite differently from those of other makers, and it can be an Indiana Jones adventure to try to find the pathway in the menu that will lead you to the command you wish to exercise. Quite a few camera makers employ poison dart shooters and giant stone balls to discourage you from finding their treasures. Just getting to " format " can be a feat. The choices after that for sizes, shapes, renderings, colour, and such are pretty much standard between each camera in any...

Well, let's be honest with ourselves - they've been doing that since their first Photoshop program. And we've grumbled about it as we learned what their odd words and commands meant. But this time Adobe can give us good advice. A lot of people use Lightroom to process their images - even if they do not fiddle with them later in any of the other Adobe programs. They get up a library of whatever the latest shoot is, throw out the duds, and clean up the rest. Then they sort and send the resultant images to other areas for storage, printing, or delivery. The lucky people who have discovered Loupedeck + do this with great ease and can power through large jobs a lot faster than the mouse jockeys. Ask me, I know. The best day I had in the last decade was the one when I saw the Loupedeck+ at a PhotoLive event. I watched a friend buy one and when I knew it wasn't dangerous, I followed suit. CE sell 'em...

SPECIAL RULES: Two lenses only. Photographers proceeding past this point will only be allowed two lenses. More than two will result in the excess optics being confiscated and put into landfill. You have been warned. I don't take anything for granted these days when I read official notices - particularly if it is me writing them. I have no idea whether anything is real any more so I just play along and edge closer to the door. The idea of One Lens To Rule Them All is popular in some circles. It makes a good debating point for a camera club meeting or a cage fight. Everyone can have an opinion and after they have expressed them, you can have a good time going around and seeing if they actually uphold their own ideas. The number of lenses in the average camera bag or equipment cupboard put the lie to this one. Note: No sensible retailer would deny people the chance and advantage to own multiple lenses. We've got our own opinions too, but they need not confine you. Buy as many lenses...

The term " Nifty Fifty " was coined a few years ago to make what was the standard focal length for the 35mm camera seem new and exciting for the DSLRs of the time. That's what advertising writers do - they attach adjectives to things and adverbs to actions and hope that you are interested enough to buy the gear. In the case of selling 50mm lenses they were trying to get another lens into the gadget bag to supplement the ubiquitous zoom lenses of the time. Whether these were kit inclusions or outside purchases, the price and design factors at the time meant that most zooms had moderately small maximum apertures and many had variable ones as well. The one-camera amateur might not ever really need more than the kit zoom but the lens makers needed more than one-lens sales. The choice of the 50mm length was a fine recollection of the film era - from the Leica Elmar onwards this focal length was considered the standard view of the world for the format and a great deal of effort was...