flash Tag

Well, this is Western Australia and it is high summer this week, after all. Out is hot and in is cool - and where does the Siamese cat in the fur coat choose to sleep? You guessed it. But the Godox people are smarter than the cat  - they realise that bringing the Godox AD600Pro inside will have the benefit of letting us use it as a studio flash in the cool  - and we can access the AC mains current as we do it. The Godox AD 600 Pro is supplied with a good big lithium-ion battery to power it in the field. That's the picture below, with the charge lights lit. Not much power in the battery as supplied, but you charge it before use and the lights all go on. Plenty of power, a warning sign for the hot surface, and no wonder. That is a big LED panel in there - along with something I've not seen before; a user-pluggable flash tube. The specs say 360 full power shots  - more if you're dialling down - and a 38...

No, I've not gone dyslexic.  Shooting pictures of sport is a time-honoured form of photography. Early successes in the wet-plate era would have been rare, but subsequent improvements in plates, films, lenses, and shutters meant that the 20th century's photographers got more and more sports into their lenses and out onto printed paper. Now in the digital era i cannot think of any sport that doesn't have exceptional coverage from professionals - we all see the best of the action every time we open a newspaper or turn on a screen. As an audience we are presented with a magnificent visual feast, and all it needs for satisfaction is an interest in sport. Which I do not have. Not at all. Couldn't care less who kicks a puck into the basket on the MCG. Wish them well and no torn cartilages, but that's about the extent of it. Emigrated to the wrong country, eh? On the other hand, I do like looking at pictures. And sculpture, and dance. And when I cannot see it firsthand, I like seeing it on the screen or...

Whether 'tis nobler to take arms against the fierce shadows and defeat them or to flash, perchance to fill - Aye, theres the rub. Pardon the bad parody of Shakespeare, but I have never accorded him the worship that English Lit teachers and Arts Council directors were wont to do. I was Macbeth'd early, the bump came up, and I have been immune since. The question here and now is whether to use the TTL function of the speed lights that we attach to our digital cameras. I had several Nikon TTL lights that fit the D300 cameras and a new EF-X500 Fujifilm speed light that works with the fujifilm stable. I've cobbled up a rig that places the flash beside the cameras and feeds the information back and forth on a Canon TTL cable. Canon? Similar contact placement to Fujiflm and works quite alright. Funny that Fujifilm do not have one dedicated for themselves...

Say what? Oh, no, we're not going to roast that old chestnut again. Climb the barricades, wave the HCB banner, and throw Leica rangefinders at the police. Would throwing Argus C-3's be more appropriate? They've got sharper corners. The age old debate about artificial versus natural light probably started when the first photographer put his cigar out in a pot of magnesium powder. It would have continued unabated through the tungsten and fluorescent tube era on to flashes - trays, sheets, bulbs, tubes etc. Purity, authenticity, sanctity, and artistry would have been invoked by one side to deny the chance for others to see in the dark and equally so by those who wanted to illuminate the world. In the last decade the fight has been taken out of the ring by the development of powerful amplifying circuits and noise-rinsers that let the nominative sensitivity of a sensor rise to fantastic heights. Starting with the Nikon D3 and continuing with their products - and those of other major makers  - the ability to photograph in places too dim to see in has become...

Fujifilm X-100V, please, and step on it. I don't want to be late. I am a man of my word - I brought down suitable models for the Fujifilm X-100V test as I said I would. 1:43 scale models of a taxi and a mustard van. And yes, I would trade my car for a 30's Ford sedan or a Citroen H van in a second. Not sure if I'd haul mustard in it but it would make a cool camper conversion. The reason for the toy cars was to test out the new lens formulation on the x-100V. The original lens of the X-100 and the three subsequent iterations was glorious for general photography but started to soften up at the edges when you moved into extremely close-up range with the camera. For a model shooter it limited the use to medium distances. Otherwise, the fact that the camera never had dust-bunnies on the sensor and synched at all speeds with the studio lights made it a dream to use. Roll on to now and look at the Ford. Excellent focus  -...

And do it digitally. You all can. I attended a funeral last week of an old club-mate. In the manner of many modern ceremonies there was a slide-show presentation at one point and we got to see as many good pictures of his 94 years as had survived war and emigration. The quality of the old stuff was exceptional...

You might be forgiven for thinking that wireless triggers are simple things. So they are when all you wish to do is tell a circuit to close at a distance from the camera. You put a transmitter on the hot shoe of the camera, a receiver under the Speedlight out in the distance, and fire away. As long as the things are plugged in correctly and the AA batteries are fresh, it works every time. When you start to go TTL, however and start to introduce different models of different maker's flashes, the whole thing becomes as complex as a spider's web. Here's a collage of images from the different trigger systems here in the shop on just one day. Beware that not all triggers made are shown - you have miles to go in this forest before you can sleep...