film Tag

If you're a film-maker who has retained your love for film per se you probably have established your workflow with one of two formats; 16mm or Super 8. The latter is available in cartridge form these days with monochrome and colour material still being produced. Not as much as in analog era, but you can still clap a load into one of the superbly-capable mechanical or electronic cameras of the 20th century and produce good results. They will be different from the images that digital video yields, but that may be the look that you are after. Okay, you've located a camera and found out how easy it is to operate - what do you do to get the film and then have it processed? Well Kodak no longer process in Coburg nor Agfa in Nunawading...

Let's go on a photo safari into Camera Electronic. I choose Murray Street and nominate Rheagan as our guide and hunter. But unlike all the other photo safaris we undertake, this one will be strictly to rule: we are looking for the best bang for the buck with a bill. We'll take a $5 bill, a $ 10 one, a $20, $50 and $100 as well. A total of $185 in real folding cash - plus $ 6.00 in coins for an overpriced coffee in one of the mall shops later. We aren't allowed to combine the bills into one wad and spend that - each financial instrument must do the best purchase it can for our photographic needs. Any spare change from each transaction can go into the Refreshment Fund. So let's start shopping - these are Rheagan's finds in the wild...

We often show the instant cameras that are popular with analog photographers - Impossible Project ones or Leica ones or Fujifilm ones - we've even had Lomo instant cameras. But we rarely feature the most important part of their makeup - the film packs. The question of film for Polaroid Cmaeras - either original or revamped - is a more complex one than that for the Fujifilm Instax systems. So let's look at what was on the rack at Stirling Street. Eight Squares in colour for $ 30 but beware that it fits the new cameras: And here's the monochrome version for the same price. Should you have a Polaroid Pop camera with the inkless thermal technology you shoot more pictures for less money. But going away from the Polaroid-centric supplies, here are the various choices for the Fujifilm Instax System. Not all cameras are represented here but be assured that the Leica film is, indeed, Instax. The joy of Instax for Fujifilm is that it sells by the trainload. It is one of the major earners for their photo division in Japan and I'll bet...

How you do anything has a great deal to do with the supplies you have available. Analog photography is no exception - and these days unfortunately the machinery and raw materials are getting scarcer. At this point I'd like to point out that at one time there was no such thing as analog photography - prior to 1826. Between that and 1975 there was only photography. Subsequently there has been digital as well. Which gives you pause...

When to pursue analog photography is a question that really is a way of asking what advantages it has over digital work - and when should one access them. The idea of advantge may not have occurred to some younger photographers. Consider: a. The digital camera is free of the need for film and tied slavishly to the need for electricity. This means the kind of attention to batteries and chargers that young men used to devote to young women and beer. You might be able to hop on a plane without worrying about X-rays spoiling your film, but try hopping on without three chargers and a bag of cords. One chain off, one chain on. b. The analog camera may be a lot less automatic than your normal digital. This might be frightening, but consder how much quieter and less obtrusive the best of the analog machines can be compared to whizz-beep-buzz of your digital trying to autofous on a grey cat in the fog. c. The analog camera limits the number of times you can repeat a pointless shot. At the...

Remember that I promised you six destinations? Well, the first is Whatford. What is analog photography? What was it before, and what is it today? Basically, it's recording an image using chemical means, rather than electronic ones. It was tried over two centuries ago by chemists and experimenters with no means of permanently fixing their image once a lens had shown it. A novel trick, it became a reality when a French gentleman used Bitumen of Judea and oil of lavender to take a picture of some rooftops. And then further French, English, German, and American gentlemen invented faster, better ways to do this...