retro Tag

Not going to enter into a debate about which is better - analog or digital - or to take one side or the other. I've done the one and do the other and in both cases I'm just grateful when I can see the faces in the pictures and the horizon is straight. But I am curious as to whether there will be any new developments of value in the analog field in the future. I was drawn to this speculation earlier in the year by the news that the Perth photo markets were set to reopen in November after a two-year hiatus. I wondered if there would be a flood of secondhand digital or whether we'd see the same old run of film cameras. I also experienced the shock of the old encountering the new when I went to a hifi retailer seeking a small CD player for a studio system. Oh Dear Me, I can buy amazing new Bluefi things that are probably better, but if I do not want to start up with new technologies, I'll be reduced...

I dived for the Nikon stand at the PhotoLive 2021 as soon as I saw the little group of colourful cameras at the front of the table. I'd been primed to this by reports of the new Nikon Zfc retro-style mirrorless camera that had been introduced just a few weeks earlier by the company. I read DP Review and Rockwell and a lot of other sites every day - the reports so far seem very impressive. What I didn't realise was that the colourful examples there were trade samples showing the decor. Nevertheless, they were spectacular to look at and I think will sell the product to a whole new range of clients - people who have started to see cameras just as same old/same old. There is bound to be a major show and launch when they come on stream here in Australia and I am going to make sure I'm there to see it. There will also be the release of a much bigger new Nikon mirrorless camera, I suspect, but this is still just glimpses and rumours from...

That's not a typo. Principals was what I wrote. In this case we grasp the principals of the computer design teams for Macrohard and Rutabaga - the people who decide what your next Rutabaga or Macrohard computer will look like - firmly by the throats, and explain what we want. a. We want the foot of the desktop computer to be wider and deeper. This may seem to be counter-intuitive. Everything these days is meant to be slimmer and smaller. But be realistic - go to the mirror - are you slimmer and smaller than you used to be? Is your desk slimmer and smaller? Not if you are actually doing any work on it. Mine is the size of the flight deck of the NIMITZ and even now I'm contemplating folding the wings on the graphics tablet to make it fit better. In short, we have bigger desks, and multi-level desks. The footprint that the Rutabaga rests on can be bigger to give the screen a lot more stability. b. On that stable base, you can add ports. You can thunder, lightning, or be...

Or you may prefer to deal with the Chip Paper Design Bureau. Or the Back-Of-An-Envelope Studio. All fine organisations who take modern concepts and wring them out like dishcloths. Careful they don't drip on you. Last post we speculated on Nikon's possible retro-styled APS-C mirrorless camera. Interested parties can google off to the Nikon Rumors site and read the details. Beware, however, as the digital images presented may have been done with more hope than science. Yellow Pad has taken the retro idea and applied it to a mythical camera - one made by the Flapoflex company. It starts with the basic Flapoflex 35mm camera they sold in the old days; the Falpoflex Beulah . This was an almost-Yashica design with semi-Petri overtones and the occasional outbreak of Ihagee-ism. It cranked through 35mm film behind a fixed 45mm lens and was cheap enough to be sold  everywhere from Abe's of Maine to Steamer Point in Aden. Innumerable Australian tourists sat with Flapoflex instruction books on their knees on cruise ships or package flights and tried to understand how to load film. The...

I have started speculating about the old working dogs in the Perth photo scene. I hasten to add I do not mean the people - I have too much respect for the photographers to pry into their ages. Plus I want them to like me enough to buy me coffee and cake on occasion. No, I mean the equipment. I don't know the answer to these questions but I'd welcome answers to the column or in person from the people concerned. Who is shooting professionally with: a. The oldest camera per se. What year was it purchased? b. The oldest analog camera. What work are they tackling with it? c. Ditto the oldest digital camera. Are there any of the original ground breakers still whirring? Where do you get batteries for it? d. Okay, now we go out past where the buses run. Who is using - professionally - the oldest and smallest memory card? Do they shoot with their fingers crossed? You can pursue this line of enquiry for the enthusiasts and amateur users as well. They don't have to earn a living with the...

  Some years ago I was delighted when my friend Warren visited the shop and bought a small camera bag. As much for the social contact as the sale - it got pretty fraught on Friday when the point of sale computer program refused to cooperate and no help was offered. I was glad he had cash as I could not have faced another EFTPOS incident. As a passing comment he mentioned that he wished the manufacturers of little digital cameras would make some that resembled older film cameras - the bellows types or box cameras. Warren is a re-enactor and part of his role involves capturing images while in character. An "old camera " new camera would be perfect for what he does. Come to think of it, it would be perfect for what I do as well. I could eschew housing Fujifilm X-series cameras in wooden boxes and haul them out in the vintage world openly. It raised the question in my mind why the Japanese or Chinese firms have not jumped on this little bandwagon straight away. After all, we have seen no end of weird...

Some years ago, when they were new on the scene, I reported on the Nikon Df camera. It was an unusual offering from Nikon at the time, and has not become any more mainstream in the interim. Finding an example on the CE shelf this week spurred me onto another consideration of it. Nikon cannot be accused of being sticks in the mud...

My curiosity satisfied about the silver-coloured titanium body of the new Fujifilm X-Pro3 camera, I drifted up the stairs and through the hallway past the new storage cabinets - and was taken with the collection of old Leica bodies and lenses that have washed up on the self there. These were chrome finished and blackened before the modern digital era and i was curious to see how well they were made and whether they had lasted. Take note that these are collector's bodies and lenses - not intended for work any more...