Panorama Tag

Before you leap to your feet and wave a flag, this is not about that sort of emotion. Nor is it the last night of the Proms.* This is about panoramas. Those wide pictures that spread out over coffee tables, railway stations, and lounge room walls. The ones that are wider than they are tall - and by a considerable margin. The boundaries of what is considered a panoramic shot seem to vary with different authors or equipment companies, but I just take them to be anything I have to turn my head to view. Bear in mind I wear spectacles and they tunnel my vision somewhat - you may be able to see in a more panoramic fashion just when you gaze on the landscape unaided. Panoramas used to be hard work - you can see examples of them taken in the wet plate era - or even earlier - and made up of multiple shots stacked side by side. There may be differences of tone, of texture, of exposure between panels, and the distortions of the lenses may be compensated...

And that one day is going to be Friday, the 7th of October. He's going to be at the Pan Pacific Hotel - 207 Adelaide Terrace, holding a one-day seminar to help Western Australians understand their digital cameras and - to paraphrase his own advertising - to make something very simple out of something that might have seemed hard work.Ken's a landscape person - Oh, Boy, is he a landscape person - and the landscapes he has captured are the wide views of Australia. Limited edition prints, published books, calendars, cards, DVD's, and even jigsaw puzzles. He is an honourable jigsaw maker - he gives you ALL the pieces in the box...

IIn the first column that looked at the Samyang 24mm f:3.5 tilt/shift lens we turned the little plastic knob that shot the lens structure off the central optical axis in an arc. If we waggled it left or fight we could induce the Scheimpflug effect ( I'll wait here while you Google it. Come back after you're done...

In an never-ending quest to find the smallest and lightest accessories for you, we have hit upon this little gem.It's a tiny ball level that you slide onto the hot shoe of your mirror-less camera for when you want flat horizons. If you're going to take landscapes - and in particular if you are going to go out capturing a series of shots for a panorama - you need this.Big deal? You might not think it if you see a set of bubble levels on your tripod, but sometimes those levels are placed there as a sales incentive without being a photo aid. If the camera is not level, the whole thing is pointless, and sometimes the makers put the tripod levels on bits that are just not going to help - you need a bubble level on the camera itself to get what you want.It weighs about nothing and doesn't cost much more - and if you plan to use the on-board flash anyway you can reserve the hot shoe for this level. I'd say this it the tourist's...

Two good bits of economic news from Epson - makers of fine inkjet printers, inks, and media.1. The cash back offer to purchasers of Epson Stylus Pro SP-4900 printers has been extended. From the 15th of September to the 31st of October 2015 you can receive a $ 500 cash back from Epson on these fine devices. Of course you have to buy it from a dealer - like us - between these two dates, but all you have to do is contact them online after you have your printer and let them sight your serial number and invoice.The 4900 is a very sophisticated A2 roll and sheet printer. It can produce all day, every day.2. You can also participate in the Epson cash back festival by purchasing one of the new Epson SureColor SC-P600 inkjet printers between the 15th of September and the 15th of November 2015. In this case you do the same proof of purchase to Epson and receive $ 300 cash back.The SC-600 would be ideal for the home printer and enthusiast. It can take roll...

Yesterday's staff training concentrated upon Cullman products and one of the bits really caught my eye. I'll be careful in future about bending over near the shelves. The doctor says it is just a bruise and I should be fine in a week.Moving on from there - here is the device: the Cullmann answer to panoramic pictures.The bottom turntable fastens to the head of your tripod - it could be a Cullmann, which is an easy bolt-on, or another maker's head - equally easy after a little wrangling. You can use a ball head, a three-way head, or a leveler.This turntable has a precise Arca-Swiss sized jaws on the top and into this the L-shaped bracket just glides.You position your camera anywhere on the horizontal or vertical arms of the bracket for landscape or portrait orientation depending on the coverage you want and the nodal point of your lens.Note - there may be a table somewhere on the internet that gives nodal point measurements for camera and lens combinations. I haven't found it yet but would be grateful to any...

There are a number of manufacturers of panoramic accessories for modern digital cameras - Manfrotto, Novoflex, and Cullmann come quickly to mind. I'm sure there must be more, but as we have found these three to satisfy most of the requirements of the customers, these are the ones we have featured in the shop.They all have their merits and charms - and in some cases mild drawbacks. Some designs suggest that the designers never actually carry their products themselves to do a job - at least not over a long distance. If they did they would reduce the weight, bulk, and complexity. There's probably a compelling argument for each additional feature that someone puts on the basic apparatus but unless you need that feature you are going to pay to haul it around...

Just a small note for the users of Manfrotto 190 tripods with removable center columns.The 556B center column is available as an accessory for these - it allows you to add the capability of levelling the head separately from the orientation of the legs. This means that if you are using a video head it can start movement dead level with the horizon and then move to a smooth pan. You'll see a mechanism like this on the larger professional motion picture tripods.The basic platform sits in a bowl and you get some 15º if tilt in all directions - the grip down at the bottom of the column then tightens up.What it would also be perfect for is the panorama enthusiast. Combine this leveller with a simple turntable and you would have a complete light pano head that doesn't flop around. Gotta be a good idea for someone....