Nikon Tag

Nikon recently announced not one but two new MC lenses - the Nikkor Z MC 50mm f/2.8 and the Nikkor Z MC 105mm f/2.8. All Nikon Z mount shooters enjoying a Nikon Z5, Nikon Z6 II or the stellar Nikon Z7 II should take note. The new Nikkor Z MC lenses are here to take your macro photography to the next level.  In recent years, macro photography has enjoyed a resurgence in popularity. It is no longer considered a problematic photography genre to master - one that requires expensive specialist gear. It is now more affordable and more accessible than it has even been. If you’re already shooting with the Nikon Z5, Z6 II or the flagship mirrorless Nikon Z7 II, these lenses open up a whole range of new challenges.      The Nikkor Z MC lens duo release provides the option to suit your shooting style, budget, and kit size. If you want a more compact and cost-effective macro kit, the Nikon Z5 mirrorless digital camera and Nikkor Z MC 50mm f/2.8 are your go-to solution. However, enthusiasts shooting with the Nikon...

The new Nikon mirror-less camera body is here - at least here in the interne reveals and reviews. They will be here on the line, so to speak, in the fullness of time. Pre-orders are possible and there is a good deal of interest amongst the photo community. As with every new thing, there are the people for whom it is the greatest thing since sliced bread. Then there are people on a diet who cannot afford it and will assure you that they never eat bread...

When planning and packing for an outdoor adventure, most of us grab our trusty DSLR or mirrorless camera. Add to this some suitable lenses for landscape or wildlife along with fresh batteries and memory cards. But have you ever considered that you might be missing out on something? A handy addition to any wildlife or landscape photography kit is a pair of binoculars.  Binoculars have come a long way since the models our grandparents handed down to us. Bulky, heavy and optically imperfect antiques have retired. These have given way to modern binoculars with the same level of build and optics quality as a modern camera lens. It is also astounding just how many styles and variants of binoculars there are. What’s more, brands such as Nikon, Canon, Olympus and even Leica develop precision binoculars. They all have a long history of making precision optics for more than just camera gear.      There’s a lot to be gained from packing a pair of quality binoculars on your next outdoor adventure. For wildlife photographers, it provides a means to quickly scan a location and...

And if you hit the focus stacking piñata hard enough, all sort of cameras and systems fall out! I thought It was only me and the Olympus users who were in on the secret of automatic focus stacking. Hah. It looks as though lots of people using a modern mirrorless from one of the big Japanese makers - and some who are using DSLRs - can get lucky. My Fujifilm X-T2 and many subsequent models have the auto bracketing. Olympus cameras do - Panasonic cameras do ( though they use a slightly different idea that makes use of a 4k burst while running through the focus range ) and YouTube says newer Sony picture boxes will do it too. How about Nikon? Now that they are producing top-quality mirrorless cameras - the Z 5 , Z 6, and Z 7, surely they might be candidates? I called Michael Philips, our state Nikon Australia expert, and put the question to him. He confirmed the good news, and went off and did some experimenting of his own to find the answers to some of the questions....

Why should I advertise Nikon D6 cameras in this weblog column? I cannot possibly sell one of them to any of the readers. Is it all just a waste of electronic space? Well, my detractors would agree with this. All that can be said about this Nikon flagship camera : a. Has been said by Nikon. b. Has been said by Ken Rockwell and DP Review. Ken's piece will be the one with the saturated colours and the bit about sending him $ 5...

Some years ago, when they were new on the scene, I reported on the Nikon Df camera. It was an unusual offering from Nikon at the time, and has not become any more mainstream in the interim. Finding an example on the CE shelf this week spurred me onto another consideration of it. Nikon cannot be accused of being sticks in the mud...

If one were to read all the literature of the last couple of years regarding the format and sensor sizes of digital cameras, one might be forgiven for thinking that there has been somewhat of a witch hunt. By this I mean the smaller format sizes have received scant treatment alongside the 24 x 36 FX or full-frame cameras. This is not surprising - it's been relatively late in the piece that large sensors could be made by Sony in sufficient quantities and at a low enough price to permit their incorporation by other makers. And don't look shocked when I couple the one maker with the others - they buy their components from each other. Okay, you can buy 24 x 36 Nikons, Canons, Leicas, Sonys, and Panasonics off the shelf today. And lots of lenses for them, whether they are going to be for DSLR or mirrorless operation. You'll be told that the larger sensors and wide lenses are capable of marvellous photographic effects and increased light-gathering powers. There are a number of technical explanations for this and many of...

And that just about describes the last couple of months, eh? I am assuming that you have, like my family, been doing the right thing and hunkering down in the bunker. So far we are safe and cabin fever has not set in. We wait the day of the big breakout, however. So, back to the cameras. And the dilemmas of which, what, how, why, etc. The first thing to do is to consider whether you need to have a dilemma at all. Do you need two lemmas? Would one do? For many of us, it would. One camera. One only - and with one lens on it, too. This may seem a little anti-business for a firm that would like to sell you many cameras, but remember that the founder of Camera Electronic - Ron Frank - was a genius at helping people decide which single camera they needed. He could, and did, ask exactly the right question at exactly the right time. If he could get a clear answer from the client, he could hand them precisely what they needed. If...

Look at me - I'm on your screen talking to you now - and I look better than 95% of all the rest of the Zoom, Skype, and Facetime users that you've been talking to. My secret? Soft frontal lighting, a good mens and an aperture of f:2.8 to f:4. Everyone else at the Zoom conference is using the tinky little webcam that's built into the top of their screen or a leftover webcam that they found in a drawer. The inbuilt one might have a little better colour or dynamic range than the leftover lens ( Does that really say Fisher -Price on the bottom? Should it be red and blue? ) but both of them have tiny lenses and tiny apertures and you can see the entire contents of their houses behind the people as they speak. And at this stage of the lockdown, they ain't dusting...