Nikon Tag

I was delighted with the Tamron Tap-in Console when I opened the box in the studio. I don't own a DSLR or a Tamron SP lens, but  the look of this accessory is reward enough - it's like having an electronic hockey puck with a USB interface, eh? For the people who use the higher end Nikon or Canon DSLR bodies and want to pair them with compatible Tamron lenses, this "hockey puck" acts as an interface to do a number of things: Put in firmware updates that may be issued by Tamron. Put in correction factors for individual lenses in regard to auto focusing at three separate distances. You have to determine the best correction numbers by separate test but once achieved you can lock them in via Tamron website commands. Put in auto-focus limiting modifications if you want to change the range of this. Decide whether you'll need MF and optimise the focus ring operation. Optimise how the stabilisation system of the lens acts according to your own needs. These are valuable things to control - but you'll have to...

And about. It was no good sitting in a studio shooting P-38's with this camera and lens. It'd do a perfect job insofar as the depth of field at 50mm will allow. Better to take it out into the wider world and see what a standard lens on a sensor of this quality could find. Before I went out, however, here is the Dirty Blue Bird. ETO P-38 PRU in artificial haze and turbo supercharger discharge. Never mind expensive kits - $ 19.95 and a week's work. The venue selected was nearby - the RAAF Museum in Bull Creek.  It has semi-darkness, as befits a museum, back lighting from windows high up in the hangars, and a variety of colour intensities and surface reflectances - all the way from service matte to museum gloss. Plus colour temperature swings on a semi-cloudy day.                   What better way to test a camera that has extremely good ISO performance, large sensor, and a matrix meter. Plus there's an f 1:1.4 lens on the front. If you're a nervous flier you can wait at the souvenir counter...

There. That states it succinctly. A week devoted to one of the flagship cameras of one of the flagship photographic manufacturers. A full-frame DSLR that embodies most of what Nikon knows about digital shooting. More sophisticated than I am used to, but a rewarding challenge. Those who have one may read to see if I bolster their pride of ownership and those who are wondering if they should buy one can see what it does in the hands of an amateurishly professional enthusiast casual user...

The early days of aviation, automobiles, and railways all had several things in common; the look of the first airplanes, cars, and steam engines was unusual. Unusual in that the devices had not been seen before, and unusual in that they do not resemble anything that we see now. They were cutting-edge technologies for their times and claimed the right to be that new sight in the land. No-one knew what the standard shape should be - as a result, there were some odd-bods...

" My client wishes to plead guilty to the charge of using camera equipment to do things that it was never intended for, M'Lud. He tenders  images taken with the Nikon 1 camera in evidence. He wishes to have it noted that he is well aware that most of the customers of the shop probably make just as many inappropriate experiments as he does and would like to see what their results look like...