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What have we here? Exactly the camera I have been waiting to test! And no-one told me it was lurking in the Fujifilm cabinet.  Luckily I peer everywhere in the Camera Electronic shops and always have done. I would recommend it to all the readers. You can discover more in Stirling and Murray Street than you can wading through a steamy jungle. The new Fujifilm X-100V is here in silver with the black version set to arrive in a few months. You can decide yourself which looks best to you, but I must say the silver is elegant. If you are an Adobe user you'll be restricted at present to the jpeg settings - ACR on lightroom doesn't open its RAW files yet. I daresay this is coming soon. No matter- the Fujifilm jpegs are excellent and the camera seems to cope very will with exposures under varying lighting conditions.   The two front views of the camera show it to be very similar to the basic outline of the previous X-100 series cameras. You'll be hard pressed to see the subtle casing differences...

If you go to the right places and keep your eyes open you learn something. Tuesday night last at Camera Electronic was one of those places when Michael Philips and Daniel Carson presented the new Nikon D780 body to the audience. I was sorry for Michael because I think the thunderstorm that hit Perth just before dusk kept a lot of potential viewers away. I was sorry for me when I tried to drive in Vic Park just after the thing went through...

This week I got to satisfy my curiosity about the light-titanium coloured Fujifilm X-Pro3 - there was one ready in the sales cabinet in Stirling Street. I popped it out and attached an XF 50mm f:2 R WR lens - one of the silver-finish models. I wanted to see how close the two light colours are. Well, not that close. The phenomenon of a silver-finish body having a different appearance from the lenses that are made to go on it is not just a Fujifilm thing. You can see it with Olympus and other cameras. My dear old Leica M2's chrome finish didn't exactly match the barrel on the 50mm collapsible Elmar back in the day either. The closest I ever saw were actually Kodak Retina Reflex cameras and some Contarex models. If you are afflicted with OCD - Obsessional Chromatic Disorder - you can always opt for plain black for both body and lens. Like Coco Chanel, you'll never be out of fashion. You decide whether the appearance is for you. Be aware that the toughened Duratect finishes are very tough indeed...

Let's face it. With Olympus there is always going to be something new coming out. As with many other manufacturers, the have rolling program of new and updated equipment that takes advantage of new sensors, new circuitry, and new operational features. They spread these over several levels of sophistication in their products and try to have something for everyone to buy. And that's the operative term: buy. They make, you buy, they have enough money to make more. In this case you are buying a new version of Olympus's OM-D E-M5 camera...

Okay, that's a predictable headline given that we were at the Western Star Mercedes showroom in Osborne Park last night and that we were clustered around  a grasshopper green Mercedes AMG 4.0 V8 BiTurbo sports saloon. No-one who came into the showroom missed seeing the car.  It would be an enormous hit wherever it went - Subiaco, Dalkeith, Applecross, Winthrop. Parking it might be easy but the anxiety involved in leaving it to the tender mercies of the other shoppers would be killing. All those doors opening...

My first fiddle with a Nikon Z6 mirrorless camera and Nikkor S zoom lens today. Not a shooting fiddle*, but a chance to handle and picture it. And mighty impressed. Forgive yourself for not being able to see at first glance that this is the Z6 rather than the Z7 - they look so alike. There are internal differences, of course, to do with image resolution and size, shooting speed, and focus points, and the targeting of a less-demanding market with the 6 than the 7. But they look and act very similarly. The standard zoom fitted is 24mm to 70mm in the new Z mount - a Nikkor S lens. Note the stowed position, deployed position, and maximum zoom position. The rotation of the zoom collar into the stowed position will trigger a warning in both the LCD and EVF screen to the effect that you'll need to unlock the lens. The office is as neat as Nikon can make it while still preserving the D-pad as well as the joystick. No surprises there though I do commend the designers for...

The heading image is not manipulated, apart from increasing contrast and dropping tones to give a silhouette. It shows the newest of the Olympus micro 4/3 mirror-less cameras alongside a workshop example of my first digital camera - a Nikon D1x. They are continents apart in digital performance and capability but look how close they are in physical size...