mirror-less Tag

Today starts a week of investigation into a camera system that has flashed upon the world for what is a relatively short period of time - the Fujifilm GFX 50S. Those of you who read this column regularly and know that I am a Fujifilm user may have been wondering why it has taken this long to appear. The answer's simple; there have been numerous other reports of the camera and lenses already in the technical, fan-boy, and forum-fighter press. People can get accurate information, biased information, and outright bad manners from other sources - frequently better written than here - and there was no point in just re-transmitting it. I needed to wait until I could investigate the devices myself in my own facilities. The opportunity for this was provided by the Fujifilm people this last week...

In Melbourne you can get a cocktail at a moderately fancy bar. If you look moderately fancy as well, you might not even have to pay for it. If you look like the writer of this column you have to pay for it. If you go into Camera Electronic in Perth you can pick up a Joby Micro Hybrid Tripod. It's the same amount of money but it contains far better value - there is no water in it...

You can do produce any size camera if you try. Whatever the designer draws, if a maker can enlist a crew of eight people and a recovery vehicle just over the horizon, they can send it out of the factory door. If they are wise they will wedge the door tight so that nobody can bring it back in again. It's different if a manufacturer wants to make something that is going to be successful - because part of that success will involve real people operating it in real time. And the simpler the interface, the better chance that it will work. That is the principle around some of the changes on the new Olympus E-M10 MkIII. Look at the front - the new hand grip is much more comfortable and much more secure - it is paired with a larger and more effective thumb grip at the back.         Also note the clever engineering of the three adjustment wheels on the right hand side. They are somewhat similar in shape but have been differentiated in height to allow your thumb and fingers,...

Do you take your photography to the streets? Do you work with modern equipment? Do you want to be reasonably stylish whilst out there? Then take a look at the Lowepro Streetline range of camera bags in Camera Electronic. Right away I can hear people who have seen me on the street laughing as they read that word " stylish ". My general appearance vacillates between that of a Miami tourist in 1953 and Red Green. It could be worse - I have seen some street shooters that look like Worzel Gummidge. Many of us could stand a bit of a makeover, if only for the sake of the other people out there. We may not get it - there's a lot of old clothing in our wardrobes that needs wearing out first - but at least we can sport good camera gear. If you are working with the lighter forms of mirror-less camera, the Streetline series are designed for you. They combine a sophisticated appearance with discretion - no flashy colours and minimal leather showing. This one has a very good...

That's a play on words, with the basis being the Think Tank bags you see here. They are referred to as " Mirrorless Movers ". They move quite well, thank you, and for a good reason - they are one of the most sensible camera cases for modern use. Camera bag design and branding are one of those topics - like camera brand loyalty - that occupy a lot of  spare space in forums and group meetings. It might sound trite or pedestrian, but there are times when pedestrians would do well to think the matter out clearly. Walking around with camera equipment is a lot of fun if you are visiting interesting places and getting great shots. Walking around with an entire armamentarium of DSLR lenses in case the great shot presents itself is also fun, but most of the enjoyment occurs when you see a bench and can sit down. Thus one of the sales features of the mirror-less cameras systems - lighter weight and smaller gear. Those of you with professional-quality full-frame mirror-less cameras and the entire armamentarium of...

At any one time, our choices in photography can be surprisingly limited. Limited by artistic convention, fashion, and commerce. Often we do not notice it until some exception to the rule comes to hand - then we feel it all the more. This is the case with today's offering - the Think Tank Retrospective Leather 5 Sandstone. Colour is not exactly new to Think Tank - They have experimented with sandstone, olive drab, and RAF blue for years, and have made some wonderful large bags. Their DSLR bags are a standard of the industry. Now in the smaller mirror-less, they have combined that distinctive cloth with 50's leather style. Of course it is far more business-featured than anything we bought back then - The iPad mini pocket on the back gives that away. Also the myriad of internal pockets and slots for pens, cards, phones, business papers, passports, etc. It would not be too much to say that this could be a complete mini-studio for the travelling pro. That impression is re-inforced in the equipment compartment. Besides the main mirror-less cradle, there are...

I have been asked to apologise for making terrible puns in this column. I'm more than happy to do so as long as it does not prevent me from doing it again and again. But today's temptation is really difficult. It's not a surprise to anyone - even to me. It's the black workaday version of the graphite-silver Fujifilm X-Pro 2 we saw earlier in the year. Same beast - darker coat. Every technical thing I said last time still goes  - so nip back in the column and look at the glorious grey version as well. The difference for me is that this one gets a run with a card in it and some colourful subjects out the front. And this time I have the ability to decode the RAW file information and to tweak the files a little. I have been re-reading my book by Pfirstinger on mastering the X-Pro 1 to get a few ideas on how to deal with RAW via Lightroom CC and have implemented a number of his suggestions. In the case of the X-Pro1 and...

It is cold these evenings, and it takes a deal of energy to bestir yourself to go out and do something after dark. I kept this in mind as I watched the Northbridge Hotel function room fill up last night with Perth pro and enthusiast photographers. They were there to see the Sony A9 show and to find out what the new camera could do. It turned out that it could do a great deal for a specialist clientele - the people who need to shoot fast - moving subjects in poor light...