mirror-less Tag

Nothing like a tortured pun to start the morning, eh? Well, read on - it gets worse. The Peak Design people have always had innovative ideas about slinging cameras. We saw them first in the era of the quick-draw holster camera rig - this was about five years ago - when the flavour of the month was finding some way to suspend a heavy camera from your belt or backpack strap instead of hanging it round your neck. Their offering was a two-part metal plate that sandwiched the belt and then accepted a dedicated plate attached to the camera. It actually worked, but like many such rigs, it was fiddly to set up and required a good degree of faith to hang expensive gear on while you clambered over rocks and bodies. And it didn't quite have the kewl factor of some of the other contenders. ( My favourite was the Mississippi Traffic Cop rig that one English firm put out. You got a Sam Browne Belt made with enough bulk to suspend a hawg laig pistol...

I always like to go to the Fujifilm equipment shows when Warrewyk Williams is in town. He's the national training manager for Fujifilm Australia and every single time he's presented a new product he's had something surprising to say about the cameras. He fills in the gaps in knowledge that even Fuji Rumours leaves open. Of course some information is not released too far ahead of time - and for good reason. There are stumbling blocks to any manufacturing and marketing exercise and making much of something that never eventuates is damaging to a firm's reputation. No names, no pack drill...

One of the current buzz phrases is " Elephant in the room ". When we are accused of ignoring something that is glaringly obvious, the implication is that we are remiss in this. Far from it; wilful ignorance is one of the most useful social and diplomatic tools we have - it allows us to navigate difficult situations. I use it all the time at family birthday parties. Even the elephants are grateful sometimes. Take the question of the size and weight of full-frame DSLR cameras vs that of APS-C. Further, the supposed discrepancy between the DSLR system and the mirror-less cameras. Well, I've got two elephants right here on the shooting table, and we can poke their wrinkled grey hides...

Before this starts to sound like Goldilocks, I must hasten to add that I am writing about a Lowepro product  - a bag designed for mirror-less camera systems  and the averae tourist user. Whether you use it for bear-hunting or porridge-stealing is your own affair. The Lowepro m-Trekker SH 150 is a shoulder bag designed for a mirror-less body plus one or two of the smaller lenses and a few of the smaller accessoties that one would use on a day's travel.   Note the silencer tabs for the velcro and the little card pouch concealed under them. Also note the slim but strong padding in the compartment  - your camera and optics are safe in a crowd. If this all sounds like a little deal...

Sometimes I go into Camera Electronic and ask what's new - and sometimes they tell me. So far it has not taught me a lesson, because I keep on asking. New is not necessarily good or bad - it is just new. A fresh page in the big book of photography - a book that we get to write ourselves. In some cases I end up wishing the pages had been stuck together. Like today. I discussed a question of professional responsibility with one of the staff members - a person who is very responsible indeed. I was sympathetic because I remember being in a responsible position for forty years myself, and it frequently was a pain. Not on account of what I could or would do, but on what other parties wanted to stick onto me. I had a statutory board and a coroner at the top of the professional mountain, looking down at me, and it was no fun. A bit different in business, as there was generally only the final line of money to deal with - money desired, lost,...

I opened the box of the Fujifilm X-A5 camera expecting something of a Po' Boy camera - an entry-level device that had been cut down to the bone to capture the cheaper Asian market. I could not have been more mistaken in my life.   The camera body is smallish - in keeping with the form of the other X-A series cameras. The lens is compact - again looking to keep the overall package small. There is no eye-level viewfinder. And after that it is all luxury goods and a fabulous technology - made all the more so for me as it is a camera that is well suited for studio shooting. The top plate feels like metal.   Here's the basic form of it. Tilting CD screen, standard RHS controls, in-built flash head, and as many modern eye-catchers like 4K and WiFi as you would want. Fujifilm have thankfully kept the pop-up flash tube but also included the full suite of TTL features in the hot shoe mount. A lot of the controls have been stacked onto the touch screen, but...

Anyone who has a spouse, children, pets, employees, or subjects will know the frustration inherent in the situation. No matter what you may think of them, they sometimes insist on thinking for themselves. Orders may be formulated and transmitted, but that doesn't guarantee that they will be understood. Even if they are, there is a good chance they will not be obeyed. If this sort of mutiny occurs in the military you can throw people in the stockade or brig - if it occurs with employees you can fire them or lock them in the storeroom. If children are disobedient you can send them to their room without dinner - and if you are a bad cook you can send them with extra portions. If your pet disobeys you can just sit down and burst into tears. But what do you do when your camera - a borrowed one - refuses a lawful command? This was the case when I tried to make the Panasonic DC-G9 with the 25mm f:1.7 lens take pictures of the RCAF Wet Dog set. I was banking...

I first encountered this new Panasonic mirror-less camera at a recent blue blood moon shoot down in Rockingham. Sam Perejuan from our shop had one with a long Panasonic lens on it ready for the rising of the moon over the fertiliser works. He took shots through the heat haze and we were both amazed at the detail of the wobbles in the moon's outline as it rose. Sam wasn't using a tripod, but the extremely effective anti-shake system of the camera meant that the whole thing was sharp. I was seriously impressed. Keeping that in mind, I checked out a camera body and a Panasonic 25mm f:1.7 lens for the studio - I knew that the micro 4/3 sensor size would regard the 25mm as a standard focal length for the camera - just as the 35mm Tokina lens did on the Nikon D7500. The idea of a " standard " lens is important for my tabletops, as it simulates what might have been done with the 35mm camera for full-sized subjects. My choice, and sometimes I do use shorter...