mirror-less Tag

A little while ago we showed the Canon twin-flash for macro workers. A TTL solution for illuminating the tiniest of worlds. Well today here is a suitable lens for it - the new 35mm Macro IS STM for the RF system. A very tempting piece of glass. The 35mm focal length is somewhat ideal for both small and full-frame cameras - a normal field of view for the former and not too wide for the latter. Of course there is some debate as to what a normal field of view might be when you move to 1:1 macro - but you can decide for yourself by raising your spectacles and peering closely at something a couple of inches away from your nose. Get to the point where your focusing ability just about runs out and before you lose the ability to set the stereo images together in your head. That's how wide you can see, so that's the standard for you. Those of you who have markedly different abilities in either eye - one working better than the other at certain distances...

The next two weeks are going to be a pleasant ones for Nikon users - there is a drop in Nikon prices going on right now and there's even special bonuses to do with new products that you can pre-order. The main price reductions involve DSLR and mirrorless Nikon bodies  but there are a couple three instances where a lens is also involved. Here's the DSLR body only section: Nikon D750 - Was $ 2449 - Now $ 2099 - Save $ 350 Nikon D850 - Was $ 4799 - Now $ 4349 - Save $ 450 Nikon D7500 - Was $ 1748 - Now $ 1398 - Save $ 350   If you're looking for a lens with that D7500 to start you out - and to start you out well, consider adding the Nikkor AF-S DX 18-140mm f:3.5-5.6G ED VR to the purchase Nikon D7500 + 18-140mm kit  - Was $ 2048 - Now $ 1748 - Save $ 300   Okay, that's the full-frame and APS-C DSLRs tidied up - now for the new Nikon Z7 mirrorless camera and the lens and FTZ accessory adapter: Nikon Z7...

The preparation of the new Nikon Z-series mirror-less camera systems must have been a time of furious activity in the Nikon organisation. Leaving aside the marketing questions and the business strategies - forced or otherwise - the idea of a new Nikon lens mount as well as a new type of Nikon camera would have had all departments designing like madmen. How much paper, how many pencils, and how much midnight ( whale ) oil must have been expended is anyone's guess. The chance to start afresh with something  like this would have been relished by the lens designers. A new mount - bigger and less complex than the previous F-mount - would have relieved them of a lot of the pressure that they were under in their earlier digital age. The fact that they are now firing their light rays into a larger sensor means exit paths need to spread - but all the years of the 24 x 36 film capture will have been good experience. Ah, but now there is no mirror box or mirror to stay clear of,...

My first fiddle with a Nikon Z6 mirrorless camera and Nikkor S zoom lens today. Not a shooting fiddle*, but a chance to handle and picture it. And mighty impressed. Forgive yourself for not being able to see at first glance that this is the Z6 rather than the Z7 - they look so alike. There are internal differences, of course, to do with image resolution and size, shooting speed, and focus points, and the targeting of a less-demanding market with the 6 than the 7. But they look and act very similarly. The standard zoom fitted is 24mm to 70mm in the new Z mount - a Nikkor S lens. Note the stowed position, deployed position, and maximum zoom position. The rotation of the zoom collar into the stowed position will trigger a warning in both the LCD and EVF screen to the effect that you'll need to unlock the lens. The office is as neat as Nikon can make it while still preserving the D-pad as well as the joystick. No surprises there though I do commend the designers for...

The heading image is not manipulated, apart from increasing contrast and dropping tones to give a silhouette. It shows the newest of the Olympus micro 4/3 mirror-less cameras alongside a workshop example of my first digital camera - a Nikon D1x. They are continents apart in digital performance and capability but look how close they are in physical size...