DSLR Tag

The next two weeks are going to be a pleasant ones for Nikon users - there is a drop in Nikon prices going on right now and there's even special bonuses to do with new products that you can pre-order. The main price reductions involve DSLR and mirrorless Nikon bodies  but there are a couple three instances where a lens is also involved. Here's the DSLR body only section: Nikon D750 - Was $ 2449 - Now $ 2099 - Save $ 350 Nikon D850 - Was $ 4799 - Now $ 4349 - Save $ 450 Nikon D7500 - Was $ 1748 - Now $ 1398 - Save $ 350   If you're looking for a lens with that D7500 to start you out - and to start you out well, consider adding the Nikkor AF-S DX 18-140mm f:3.5-5.6G ED VR to the purchase Nikon D7500 + 18-140mm kit  - Was $ 2048 - Now $ 1748 - Save $ 300   Okay, that's the full-frame and APS-C DSLRs tidied up - now for the new Nikon Z7 mirrorless camera and the lens and FTZ accessory adapter: Nikon Z7...

I am puzzled at the position in the Fujifilm family that might be occupied by the Fujiflm X-H1 camera. Is it a little brother, a middle brother, or a big brother? Is it a cousin? The basics of the camera have been known since its introduction; a well-built metal body, slightly bigger than the X-T1 or 2 with a heftier hand grip. Many of the features of the X-T2 plus a few extras...

Nobody ever shot at me with live rounds. Blanks, yes, but no lead. I never returned the compliment either, but had I been in the position to do so, I think I would have chosen a Nikon camera to do it with. Starting with the Nikon rangefinder cameras and lenses ( which were drawing on a number of influences from the Zeiss cameras ) in the early 1950's photojournalists had a rugged 35mm camera that could be used in Korea, Indochina, and any number of war zones. The camera bodies were improved in a direct line until the idea of the SLR took root in the late 50's. Then the Nikon F soldiered on all during its production life. The battle camera needs several things: a. To be as rugged as possible. Metal body. Metal lens barrels. b. To be as small as possible. Light is better, if you are hauling it and 80 lbs of other gear into and out of ditches. c. To be as simple as possible. Big controls for tired fingers. Locking controls if possible. None of the occasions where it will...

One of the current buzz phrases is " Elephant in the room ". When we are accused of ignoring something that is glaringly obvious, the implication is that we are remiss in this. Far from it; wilful ignorance is one of the most useful social and diplomatic tools we have - it allows us to navigate difficult situations. I use it all the time at family birthday parties. Even the elephants are grateful sometimes. Take the question of the size and weight of full-frame DSLR cameras vs that of APS-C. Further, the supposed discrepancy between the DSLR system and the mirror-less cameras. Well, I've got two elephants right here on the shooting table, and we can poke their wrinkled grey hides...

Some photographers are luckier than others - they get more bites at the cherry. Whether this means they break their teeth on the stone in the middle is another matter, but every good thing has a bad side. The shooters who do not get that second, third, or fourth bite are the ones in the sports, news, and wedding trades. What they see, whether it is at a car-race track, a political riot, or a church aisle is seen once, and needs to be captured at once. They can sometimes increase their chances of getting it by using a camera that will shoot quick bursts of continuous shots - they sort it out later on an editing desk, looking for the peak action moment. But even given this technical help, nearly all the successful ones will admit that there is a great deal of skill in the timing of what they do. Note: The equipment they use plays a vital role in whether or not they can actually get the one-off shot. It must be capable of fast multiple shots, as we said,...

I jumped ship some years ago from the Nikon DSLR system to the Fujifilm X system. The reasons I presented to myself were partly practical and partly fanciful - it was the sort of thing that many enthusiasts do without any really serious thinking. I thought that I was going to get a system that would give me the same images as before, but with smaller and lighter equipment. I convinced myself that it would be a good thing. The opportunity arose - I was working in the main shop at the time and Fujifilm prices were pitched at a deliberately low level to capture new business. Did I change over completely? Yes - selling out all the Nikon gear over a period of a couple of years. I invested the money obtained into new Fujifilm bodies and lenses. Did I lose some good equipment? Yes - the two D-300 camera bodies were real workhorses and the two SB 700 flashes were state-of-the-art devices that I had learned to control very well. Even the SB 600 was pretty darned sophisticated. I was getting...