bags Tag

Very few of us are prepared to take $ 600 in cash and throw it into a bonfire. Even if it is someone else's money, and there is a bag of marshmallows handy, there is a natural human tendency to grasp those bills tightly. But we'll spend that much money - and more - on PocketWizard radio triggers for our flash systems...

The history of military uniforms and accoutrements has seen a lot of design variation - for instance the humble cartridge box. By the time paper cartridges had come into use in the 18th century, there were any number of ways in which a soldier could carry them into battle. Some used bags slung over their shoulders, some used wooden blocks in leather cases in a similar position, and some - the Jägers and light infantry - were just as likely to have their ammunition in a wooden block/leather case strapped to their waists and worn in the front. This may have been the inspiration for the Lowepro Streetline waist pack, though it is likely that it came from many of the same style that the company has made over a period of time. Now we are in the mirror-less era, the waist pack is coming into its own. The reason for the Jägers' adoption of the design was the fact that they had to be agile and fast, prowling around the edges of a battlefield. Big cartridge pouches flapping on their flanks...

A little while ago I reported on a stylish messenger bag from Peak Design that featured industrial-strength closures combined with an unusual fabric colour. It was stylish to the max but imminently practical - a good example of industrial design finally intertwining with fashion. Well, if you need to carry more camera gear and want to carry it on a different portion of your body, have a look at the Peak Design Everyday 20L backpack. It looks as though you finally have something that need not be seen halfway up a mountain to look right - this one you can take round town. As an aside, I wonder who would need a backpack in town? Editorial shooters with lots of gear and a fair way to hike in the urban canyons? Wedding shooters who do not want to look out of place but still need to pack spare cameras, lenses, and tranquillizer darts? Food shooters who need to do their work in restaurant kitchens and might at any moment be chased by a chef with a knife? I tremble. Well anyway, the fabric and...

I am going to risk it. I know the ice is thin, and the nerves even thinner, but here goes: another review of a Sony product. Or rather, a product that can be used with a Sony camera… I have reported on Peak Design equipment before, and from the original mention some years back until now, my opinion of the brand has improved. I think it is because their design department have had better ideas and their manufacturing division has been able to translate these into good products. The Original peak Design product we saw in Camera Electronic was a belt holder for cameras - a quick release clamp that enabled you to put a camera on your shoulder strap or belt and then secure it with a click of a button. The CE staff at the time all got samples to go away and try - I demurred  - the idea seemed uncomfortable. Whenever I tried it I envisaged disaster if I was not careful how I mounted the camera. Remember I’m the man who dropped a Leica M3 with a...

Choosing a back pack for exploring the less developed corners of the empire is a delicate task. One must accurately assess the opportunities that will be presented as well as the risks that will be run. This is why our featured article - the Think Tank Trifecta 8 -  will be on the short-list of many adventurers. The basic idea of the Trifecta 8 is to take enough equipment onto the wild to enable you to capture images of the savages whilst not weighing you down in case you need to make a run for it. Modern thinking has provided us with mirror-less cameras and lenses of reduced size and weight and this is all to the good. Now we have a way to carry them about the person. Just as Kipling’s cavalryman spent the winter preparing his spring campaign - paring an ounce of weight where he could to extend the range of his mount - so we can reduce the amount of gear we carry. But it still needs to be accessible at short notice when we come across a...

Whenever I write an article that says the day of the giant camera outfit  - and equally giant camera bag - is dead, someone writes in to complain and tell me that they have 5 DSLR bodies, 16 lenses, 8 flashes, and a lucky key ring…and they want them all to go into a bag that will fit into the overhead locker on the next Virgin flight. I welcome feedback like this from my readers, and advise them to change airlines. The RAAF runs C-130 Hercules flights to lots of places and they should be able to get that camera bag in the back door of the aircraft on a pallet. They may elect to unload it with a low-altitude pass and a parachute, but that is the chance you have to take. They have better snacks than a lot of commercial flights*. Having prepared you, let me introduce a better idea - the Think Tank Turnstyle 5 sling bag. Never mind the pun in the name - I’ve done worse here and you’ve read it. The interesting thing about this sling...

Well I promised you the up-market Peak Design messenger bag and here it is: the Everyday Messenger 13. There is enough style in this one to satisfy any boutique bag buyer.The choice of fabric from which it is constructed might be thought modest enough - a medium-brown denim - but then you need to look into some of the more up-market clothing shops to see what they do with ( and charge for ) denim. This is not a pair of jeans.The basic messenger form with top flap is simple enough to think of but there are a number of design quirks in it. With the top flap down and locked, you still get a weatherproof zipper on top to allow access to the gear compartment. These used to be referred to as "stealth" opening by some makers, but anything that has a big zipper is not all that stealthy.The sides of the case are open to small compartments - one of which has a Peak Design strap peeking from it. I've no idea what they expect you to suspend...

Red is such a cheerful colour  - no wonder it is the chosen hue of The Grenadier Guards, Leica, and the people who make the stop signs.It is also a feature of an extremely well-made camera bag from ONA that is designed to catch the eye and wallet of the Leica enthusiast. Of course it could be used for many other camera systems, but the distinctive red dot that is featured on one of the bags buckle straps does rather label it as Leica oriented.If that were not enough the interior has been lined with a plush red cloth that will not scratch your best lenses and bodies. You can protect the investment whilst showing off to other people...