bags Tag

This one popped up on the radar in Murray Street - and it was completely unexpected - the online catalogue for the main Barbershop site did not list it at all. It was only when I looked at the images provided by or Australian wholesaler - C.R. Kennedy - that I was able to get details for this case. Well, this is magnificent. It is known and the " Heritage " and it surpasses even the " Quiff " as a period piece. Because make no mistake about it - this has gone well past the point of being a little handbag to haul to the shops - this is full-blown period travel luggage. The only other place you see things as wonderful as this are strapped to the rear of vintage cars. The term " Carry On "  on the Kennedy site suggests that it is suitable for in-cabin packing on domestic flights. These specify either 105 or 115 cm as a linear total of length, width and height. The " Heritage " comes to 106.5...

As you'll no doubt pick up before the end of the week - the Barbershop bag company like to name their products after hairstyles or things to do with facial hair. It's a harmless fantasy, and one that I find charming. I note that when you get to their camera straps they use " Sideburns ", " Moustache " and " Full Beard " as names  plus a wrist strap that is called the " Razor ". At present they do not seem to offer what is rather inelegantly termed a " bum bag ", but if they ever do, I am hanging out waiting for the name. I could suggest a few, but I'll bet they would ignore me...

This week I get to show you a line of products that have captured my imagination - the Barbershop range of camera and photographic bags. There are new stocks of these in Murray Street and Stirling Street  - and you'll be well advised to visit each shop as there are different models in each one. The Murray Street shop was my first stop but I wasn't able to take any of the bags for illustration - I had ridden the train into town rather than the car and couldn't carry any of them back home with me. So I posed them in the shop and hoped that the colour temperatures of the various light sources would not clash too much. I mention this because people seeing the pictures might get a false impression of the colours of the canvas and leather used in the bags. Yet another reason for coming down and actually hefting the goods in-store and seeing them in their true hues. The basic display of the smaller bags is shown in the heading image. Barbershop make models ranging from compact shoulder...

I do love a good boxing match - and look at how well the boxes that house the new Fujifilm X-T2 and X-T20 match! They have been smart enough to put them in a similar outer pack ( with the contents clearly marked so that the sales staff can find them in the dim recesses of the store-room , thank goodness, are you taking notice, Wetzlar? ) for brand unity, but imaginative enough to box the more expensive one in the black and the less expensive one in the white. Both packs are pierced to show the X logo of the marque.   Both packs feature an internal tray for the body and a separate case for all the accessories. They are easy to unpack and easy to pack up again...

Very few of us are prepared to take $ 600 in cash and throw it into a bonfire. Even if it is someone else's money, and there is a bag of marshmallows handy, there is a natural human tendency to grasp those bills tightly. But we'll spend that much money - and more - on PocketWizard radio triggers for our flash systems...

The history of military uniforms and accoutrements has seen a lot of design variation - for instance the humble cartridge box. By the time paper cartridges had come into use in the 18th century, there were any number of ways in which a soldier could carry them into battle. Some used bags slung over their shoulders, some used wooden blocks in leather cases in a similar position, and some - the Jägers and light infantry - were just as likely to have their ammunition in a wooden block/leather case strapped to their waists and worn in the front. This may have been the inspiration for the Lowepro Streetline waist pack, though it is likely that it came from many of the same style that the company has made over a period of time. Now we are in the mirror-less era, the waist pack is coming into its own. The reason for the Jägers' adoption of the design was the fact that they had to be agile and fast, prowling around the edges of a battlefield. Big cartridge pouches flapping on their flanks...