I remember reading somewhere that the blink of an eye is around 1/40th of a second.Pretty small beans when we look at shutters in DSLR and mirror-less cameras that can fire at 1/4000 or 1/8000 of a second. I mean, Crikey - at 1/8000 you could record the time interval between when your tax refund arrives and when it goes out again in utility bills...

One of the current buzz phrases is " Elephant in the room ". When we are accused of ignoring something that is glaringly obvious, the implication is that we are remiss in this. Far from it; wilful ignorance is one of the most useful social and diplomatic tools we have - it allows us to navigate difficult situations. I use it all the time at family birthday parties. Even the elephants are grateful sometimes. Take the question of the size and weight of full-frame DSLR cameras vs that of APS-C. Further, the supposed discrepancy between the DSLR system and the mirror-less cameras. Well, I've got two elephants right here on the shooting table, and we can poke their wrinkled grey hides...

There. That states it succinctly. A week devoted to one of the flagship cameras of one of the flagship photographic manufacturers. A full-frame DSLR that embodies most of what Nikon knows about digital shooting. More sophisticated than I am used to, but a rewarding challenge. Those who have one may read to see if I bolster their pride of ownership and those who are wondering if they should buy one can see what it does in the hands of an amateurishly professional enthusiast casual user...

I often go on about the convenience and portability of the cameras and lenses that are sold by Camera Electronic and sometimes get pulled up on it. People have asked whether it is at all important. After all - everything on Earth has a weight of some sort. We drive motor cars that weight far more than digital cameras ( Although you do have to remember the Bronica S2...

See?  I happened upon a Fujinon XC 50-230mm f 1:4.5-6.7 OIS II lens in the storeroom and leaped on it with a glad cry. I have several small Fujifilm X-series bodies to hand and two airports within reasonable proximity. What better chance to try the light-duty medium zoom from Fujifilm. The Fujifilm shooters who only buy the heaviest of their lenses...

At airfield, with onions. I was out at Jandakot aerodrome testing the Fujinon XC50-230mm 1:4.5-6.7 OIS II lens for this column and turned around and there he was - our friend Mark - consummate wedding and aerial photographer of Mark Wagenaar Photography ( go look up his website and admire the pictures...

Packed in the rather small package that contains the Ryze Tello drone are two interesting cards - folded advice slips from model aircraft associations in Australia and New Zealand  - the Australian one is yellow and the Kiwi one is orange. They're succinct little warning notices about some of the more pertinent regulations regarding radio-controlled flight here in the antipodes. They're not comprehensive, but they will serve to let the purchasers of the drone know that there is actually a real framework of rules that governs the interest. They are also not precisely identical in what they say, but a wise flyer will obey both of them at the same time. Note: there seems to be a bit of discrepancy about the distance that one needs to be away from an airfield or aerodrome - the Australian one says 5.5km and the NZ one specifies 4 km. I would also add that going over Commonwealth land  - particularly military or naval installations - will attract magisterial, departmental, and other sanctions. One of the best lines on the NZ sheet is the one that says to...

There's a special on this Tello drone this week at Camera Electronic - if you go over to the website catalog or the specials you'll see it. I had a notification shoot through my email - oddly enough after I had taken one home to report on it. Please note: I did not fly it round the Little Studio - While I quite like R/C model aircraft, cars, and boats, I do not have any of the necessary apps on my mobile phone to control this drone. I suspect that my eyesight these days is more of a close-range facility and this little drone could move out of my controlled airspace very quickly. Doesn't stop me from observing several things about it, though...

We're lucky here in Australia - we can use the word " cheap " to mean " inexpensive " or " frugal ". Charley Carters, the grocery chain, knew that and we could go to a shop that had oiled wooden floorboards and paper bags and not feel bad about it. This was back when there was Elvis and dinosaurs, but we are still allowed to use a perfectly good English word. In North America it has become a pejorative  - " cheap " means stingy or shoddy or small. That's the problem with languages - they can get away from you if you take your eye off them. Well, semantics aside, when we want to be cheap photographers there are still a few dodges and decisions we can tke advantage of: a. Printing paper is cheap enough at the normal rates but watch out for EOFY clearances when box prices can come down. If you don't open a box of the stuff or leave it in a damp place, you can print on it for years with no worries. Beware, however, when...

Don't keep hunting for the pickled herring - this is a post about inkjet printing papers. The title is because there are so many papers available - it can be like a photographic smorgasbord. To be certain you have got the right one for your needs you need to try them all. And I do mean all. Even if you don't really know what sort of paper you need - after all, you never know whether you like something at the smorgasbord until you taste it. You need to follow certain rules: a. Get good images to print. Learn to shoot and process a good wide-ranging image in whichever editing program you use. Even if your normal run of pictures are contrastless misty swirls or black cats in coal holes, make up a set of standard ones as well. You never can tell when your style will change and you'll want people to actually see what it is you have photographed. You can standardise on X-Rite colour panels or a test chart if you wish but be wary of becoming the photographer with the...