Well don't touch that dial, Folks. The wireless just got a lot more fun! This is the message for our eastern states listeners who will be tuning into John Stanley on the Macquarie radio network fortnightly from October 9th this year. If they are listening on Wednesday nights from 9:05 PM AEST to 9:20 PM AEST they'll hear our heros talking about all things photographic. Now Saul and Howard already do speak on air here in Perth on Fridays  - again a fortnightly show with Simon Beaumont on Afternoons - it airs from 1:30 to 1:50PM and it is a lot of fun to listen to. Despite what they might think, they really do sound like themselves on-air as they talk about all things photographic. I sit here at home trying to pick holes in their performance but so far they have done very well - they are rarely stumped for a good sensible answer. The topics that the eastern states listeners will hear are much the same as we get here - cameras, drones, repairs, exhibitions, photographers, and the occasional memory of...

An earlier column mentioned Tamron as a brand name and poked a little gentle fun at the Adaptall system that this company used in the film era. Readers may have gotten the impression that we thought little of the lenses - such is not the case. Camera Electronic and probably tens of thousands of Australians have a keen appreciation of the worth of the Tamron brand and products. It has developed over many items and many decades. Here's an example of what Tamron could do in the analog days  - do for themselves and do for you. It's a 17mm f:3.5 lens with a Nikon AI mount affixed to the back. A similar lens would have been available for most of the major mounts in those days. If its design reminds you a little of Nikon or Tokina remember that the Japanese companies did see people and ideas flow from one to another. Its mount is all metal, as things were in those days, and is sturdy and precise. The lens grind is excellent and the coating does a good job. And...

I am going to have to be careful with this post - I wish to make a comparison to a mega giant of industry. I am well aware that they have lawyers and I don't. So it will be no names and no pack drill. I bought a computer - which is recording this column right now. It is the fourth major product from a well-known manufacturer, and it is doing the job pretty well. So did two of the other major products from this same firm...

I have to be careful with that title - I tried typing in Olympus Superzoom to the net to see what help it could be and it routed me off to old eBay sellers who have 35mm cameras for sale. Eek. I wanted to see if there was a comparable model from them that matched other major makers - something that had a small sensor but an enormous lens out the front. The sort of thing that cruise and safari tourists take overseas. It looks as though they might have had something like that some while ago, but are concentrating now on the things that can be done with their Micro 4/3 line of mirrorless cameras - and that they have just come out with a new lens to do it. The lens Carlos showed me is the Zuiko 12-200mm f:3.5-6.3 - possibly the longest zoom range lens for any mirrorless camera. It's the 35mm film equivalent of 24mm to 400mm. And we never thought of that in the day...

Attitude indication is performed differently in many situations - teenagers do it by pouting and shouting, nations do it by taking political hostages, and airplanes have instruments on their dashboards to measure it. Here's a selection of different types in diagrammatic form - as seen on the internet. BTW I'm grateful to whoever took that superb picture of the Hurricane cockpit...

I approach the Leica Boutique cabinets with care - the goods within them are top-quality and deserve more than just a casual glance. If you have the price, they are generally very well-made and backed up by an extremely reputable manufacturer. You just have to be prepared for a little more brand-culture than some others. This is also the case for the companies that provide accessories for Leica - they have to provide the same standards that the main company puts out - so that if you see a bag or strap from Artist and Artisan in Japan or a Leica cameras that bears a lens made in Japan, you can be assured that it will give you sterling service. I was mega-intrigued by the brown leather pouch in the island cabinet: the Artist and Artisan ACAM-78. It looked like a tiny doctor's bag, and I couldn't imagine what Leica thought they could fit inside it. It turns out they intend it for small mirrorless bodies but they show pictures on the net of it swallowing an M-series camera plus short lens. There...

Carlos and Sam at the Stirling Street Store are real life savers. When I'm casting about for a topic to include in the week's reports here on the weblog column, they always have something new - or newish - to show me. This time it was Carlos and a new little accessory from Manfrotto. Note: I am a fan of Manfrotto, as my studio will show. Nearly everything that has to stand up or hang down does so on something from either Manfrotto or Bunnings ( and if Camera Electronic did sheets of MDF board and sausages in a bun I could cut out Bunnings...

You've seen those war movies of the aircraft carriers in the Pacific or Korea. There's an officer standing at on the port side aft with a flying helmet on and two big cloth paddles in his hands. As an airplane comes in to land on the deck he'll raise the paddles up or lower them down and dip from side to side to let the pilot know what he needs to do to get in safely. The pilot must obey the flags if he can and he is under disciplinary orders to strictly obey two of them; the cut and the wave-off. The first drops him onto the deck in time to catch the arrester wire and the second makes him climb and veer off - hopefully for a better try next time. Both are mandatory. Oh, that it could be the same in the photo trade. The idea of the flying helmet and the paddles is very attractive but a little impractical in the shop during lunch hour - someone would get bopped in the crowd. But the cut or...