wide angle Tag

Well it was a good time, had by me. I can readily recommend the Fremantle Maritime Museum to anyone with a camera and happy hours to spend. I can also recommend the two lenses that were tested out as very good ideas for this sort of shooting. Nearly all indoor events - and certainly most urban indoor museums - are close-coupled things, and you'll rarely find yourself reaching for the telephoto lens. The ability to get it all in without stepping backwards into the open drainage pit is invaluable. Particularly if you are driving home in your own car and have velour seats...

The delight I took in the first part of the day with the prime lens - the Laowa 9mm f:2.8 - was matched in the latter half of the morning when I switched to the Fujinon XF 10-24mm F4 R OIS lens. The turnover point was when the container ship slid by and I wanted to get a closer shot. Admittedly, close with 24mm on APS-C is a relative term. The colour through the blue glass needed Lightroom correction, but this was a one-click affair. With the lens changed over, I had more freedom to pick and choose framing inside. There was still a need for leveling, but not with some exhibits...

When you were a kid, did you look forward to school outings? Or family holidays when you could go see things you'd never seen before? Did those outings include the occasional museum? Well if they did, and if you loved them as much as I did, you'll know why I take such pleasure in the ones I see now. Whether it is here or in the eastern states - or in Singapore, Great Britain, or the continent - whenever there is a " Museum " sign out on the footpath, I'm in the door. And I'm in there with a camera. I am always saddened when a gallery or museum will not permit photos. Some do it for preservation reasons...

Yesterday's column introduced a lens for the Fujifilm X mount that was positively tiny. Today brings one that is positively not. They illustrate two different mindsets when it comes to wide-angle photography - you must see with which you find yourself in agreement. The Fujinon XF 10-24mmF4 R OIS lens has been the widest of their offerings for some time, but is going to joined by an even wider 8-16mm lens shortly. It'll be an f;2.8 job and you can expect it to be physically bigger and heavier than this one - but we'll be playing with this one for the time being. The packaging is straightforward Fujifilm - internal egg carton and separate lens and lens hood. The build quality is exactly like every other Fujifilm XF lens and the design style is identical to their other zooms. The lens features standard auto and manual aperture control and an optical image stabiliser system. This is somewhat of a surprise in a lens of such short focal length, but no-one who uses it will be disappointed with the steadiness. Thankfully, the lens does...

As photographers, we're never satisfied with small and neat when big and fancy comes along. This is not an admission of guilt - it is just a fact of life. A fact that the camera and lens makers well recognise - very few of them stop at giving us just one simple black thing and then never changing it. Henry Ford does not make digital camera lenses...

Climb up with me We're going to go up the Fujifilm 23mm focal length ladder this week and you can see how difficult it is to climb. Don't be afraid of a nose bleed - 23mm isn't all that high. This enquiry was sparked by the realisation that 23mm may well be the go-to focal length for the APS-C sensor when the average shooter takes a camera out. And that there are a number of ways of getting to that number. Users of other camera systems may like to look within their own catalogues or camera bags to find similar lenses - the micro 4/3 people will need to look at about 17-18mm focal length as their  nearest equivalent while the full - frame shooters will need to use 35mm lenses as their point of comparison. The thing we are achieving with a lens of this sort is very moderate wide-angle - capable of environmental portraiture as well as general coverage and landscape work. A lens that may prove to be a worker inside or outside, and it will have the advantage of...

If you are a dedicated landscape shooter - or and architectural fan - you don't even need encouragement to place a wide-angle lens on your camera and leave it sealed there for a year. You probably do this anyway. But play along with me and then you can tell other people of the advantages of the idea: a. The lenses may be smaller than the other choices - but not necessarily. Some professional wide-angles with fast apertures are substantial tubs of expensive glass. They need care with carrying and deployment as their front surfaces can bulge alarmingly. b. The lenses will make sharper - looking pictures, on the average, than their longer counterparts due to the smaller image placed on the sensor. Oh, you can still shake them into failures, but it is harder to do. You'll be able to get away with hand-holding at slower shutter speeds and lower ISO's. c. The lenses may be surprisingly inexpensive for the smaller sensor lines. But beware: a. The lenses may also be surprisingly expensive for the larger sensor lines. This is known as " the rule...

Okay - our last column praised the aesthetics of the new Fujifilm X-Pro2 in the graphite finish. The lens only got a passing mention, but as many of the readers have discovered, many cameras function better with lenses mounted on them...