wide angle Tag

There I was, first day into Camera Electronic to do some illustration for this column and the old menace turned up. A former camera salesman, he called my attention to the Fujifilm 16mm f:2.8 WR prime lens and then started pestering me to buy it. Try as I might to concentrate on the new Fujifilm X-T4 he just wouldn’t let me alone. Kept suggesting that with the short focal length and minimum aperture it would be perfect for the toy airplane shots I love to do. And that it could be placed closer to the surface that the camera rests on to make it seem a more realistic point of view. When he started in on the landscape possibilities I cut him off - I don’t do landscapes unless they are indoors and anyway we are not allowed to go to where they keep the wild ones - at least not yet. But it was no good because he kept urging me to take a test picture on the tabletop and imagine what it would be like at home in the studio....

If you are determined, we can't stop you. Indeed, the best thing that can be done is to reach into the Sigma cabinet and pull out the 14mm f:1.8 DG HSM Art lens and let you put it on your Nikon or Canon. Then you can head out for your architecture, landscape, or astro photography and we can feel that we've done our best for you. You will not go away lightly - you'll be adding 1120 g to your burden, and if this is out bush to get the landscape or the star view, that's a significant weight. No wonder- the barrel is fully professional and there are 16 elements - three of them aspherical - inside it. You 'll be operating the aperture electro-mechanically with either mount and you'll also have a option to add a rear filter if you're using the Canon version. Quite what you can do with a filter arrangement up the front is beyond me - this is a very wide view of the universe for a full-frame camera - and the adaptation you'll need for...

Some years ago I opted for the Fujifilm mirror-less X system cameras and sold off my other equipment. In the move - on I gave up a lens that was absolutely magnificent - a Sigma 8-16mm zoom. I cannot speak highly enough of it as a part of the system I used then. It scooped in big wedding parties, coped with dim, pokey little churches, and was an absolute hoot with the tabletop scenes I create. Hats off to Sigma. Unfortunately Sigma cannot get the go-ahead codes to make lenses for Fujifilm - and few other makers can either, though I note a few Chinese factories turn out X-mount lenses by the score. But that wasn't the issue. The issue was where was I going to get a lens that would do what the Sigma did - if not a zoom, then at least a decent compromise focal length. The model tabletop scenes could be made to order but the dim, pokey little churches would stay the same...

The preparation of the new Nikon Z-series mirror-less camera systems must have been a time of furious activity in the Nikon organisation. Leaving aside the marketing questions and the business strategies - forced or otherwise - the idea of a new Nikon lens mount as well as a new type of Nikon camera would have had all departments designing like madmen. How much paper, how many pencils, and how much midnight ( whale ) oil must have been expended is anyone's guess. The chance to start afresh with something  like this would have been relished by the lens designers. A new mount - bigger and less complex than the previous F-mount - would have relieved them of a lot of the pressure that they were under in their earlier digital age. The fact that they are now firing their light rays into a larger sensor means exit paths need to spread - but all the years of the 24 x 36 film capture will have been good experience. Ah, but now there is no mirror box or mirror to stay clear of,...

Do you get up before dawn and drive around the suburbs looking for houses? Do you carry an entire studio in the back of your Hyundai TinyBoy? Do you deal with surly customers at 3:30 in the morning? Are you an unpaid maid who cleans up an entire house in a half hour? Do you take pictures that are demanded faster than Jesse James can say " Stick 'em up "? And do they have to be perfect - or you go to redo the entire sequence at your own expense? At dusk, this time...

Well it was a good time, had by me. I can readily recommend the Fremantle Maritime Museum to anyone with a camera and happy hours to spend. I can also recommend the two lenses that were tested out as very good ideas for this sort of shooting. Nearly all indoor events - and certainly most urban indoor museums - are close-coupled things, and you'll rarely find yourself reaching for the telephoto lens. The ability to get it all in without stepping backwards into the open drainage pit is invaluable. Particularly if you are driving home in your own car and have velour seats...

The delight I took in the first part of the day with the prime lens - the Laowa 9mm f:2.8 - was matched in the latter half of the morning when I switched to the Fujinon XF 10-24mm F4 R OIS lens. The turnover point was when the container ship slid by and I wanted to get a closer shot. Admittedly, close with 24mm on APS-C is a relative term. The colour through the blue glass needed Lightroom correction, but this was a one-click affair. With the lens changed over, I had more freedom to pick and choose framing inside. There was still a need for leveling, but not with some exhibits...

When you were a kid, did you look forward to school outings? Or family holidays when you could go see things you'd never seen before? Did those outings include the occasional museum? Well if they did, and if you loved them as much as I did, you'll know why I take such pleasure in the ones I see now. Whether it is here or in the eastern states - or in Singapore, Great Britain, or the continent - whenever there is a " Museum " sign out on the footpath, I'm in the door. And I'm in there with a camera. I am always saddened when a gallery or museum will not permit photos. Some do it for preservation reasons...

Yesterday's column introduced a lens for the Fujifilm X mount that was positively tiny. Today brings one that is positively not. They illustrate two different mindsets when it comes to wide-angle photography - you must see with which you find yourself in agreement. The Fujinon XF 10-24mmF4 R OIS lens has been the widest of their offerings for some time, but is going to joined by an even wider 8-16mm lens shortly. It'll be an f;2.8 job and you can expect it to be physically bigger and heavier than this one - but we'll be playing with this one for the time being. The packaging is straightforward Fujifilm - internal egg carton and separate lens and lens hood. The build quality is exactly like every other Fujifilm XF lens and the design style is identical to their other zooms. The lens features standard auto and manual aperture control and an optical image stabiliser system. This is somewhat of a surprise in a lens of such short focal length, but no-one who uses it will be disappointed with the steadiness. Thankfully, the lens does...