travel Tag

Old advertising principle: you don't show a product you can't sell. Getting the crowd het up is the basis of a lot of advertising. Loosening wallets is a complex activity - there is an entire industry trying to analyse how to do it - but it's no good getting them ready to spend if there is nothing to spend on. When they are finally ready for the snake oil, have the bottles handy. This is a problem with some of the semi-advertising I do in this column. I see an item in CE, feature it a week later, and then find that it has sold out in the interim - leaving any readers who have gone into the shop on my say-so rather put out. I apologise for this, though I'm not sure why. Likewise, I have been dying to tell people to buy some things , but until the shop stocks them, I need to keep mum. At least the featured product today was there when I photographed it, and is a darned good idea. Similar products like it from other makers are also darned...

We normally don't promote a manufacturer's range of products with a picture of someone else's goods in the same advertisement - it certainly wasn't done in the golden age of Madison Avenue. They might have hinted about " Brand X" and " Brand Y " and made fake motor-car tyres out of plaster and wood to pretend that one was superior ( and they did...

Well, you know me by now. Close-up pictures galore and somewhat of a Fujifilm fanboy, but there are still a lot of things I don't know about the subject or the equipment - and I am driven as much by idle curiosity as by scientific zeal. The good thing about idle curiosity is that you can do it when you're idle...

You used to take the kids or Grannie on holiday at the seaside. Now you leave them home and take the phone, tablet, and camera and give them an outing. Which is fair enough, because most photo enthusiasts think more of their equipment than they do of their family anyway. Get your priorities right...

The daughter has just returned from a trip to Japan. It was a short visit, but as she speaks a little of the language, an enjoyable one for her. As it was a quick decision affair, I grabbed one of the spare cameras to send her off with - a dear old Fujifilm X10 that has been serving since 2012. You've seen weblog pictures taken with it years ago here on your screen. My first worry as I sent her off with it was the battery supply - the camera batteries were small in those days and these have aged. But the Fujifilm charger could be configured for the Japanese 117V system and I figured out of five of them, at least two should work. As it happened, they all did, and there was never a time when electricity wasn't available. The second concern was the settings that the camera would shoot with. I dialled up RAW and jpeg initially and then saw that it would eat up a great deal of memory. So I opted for large fine jpeg and then...

I say clambake, because that is essentially what these little gems are - mollusc shells for your photographic gear. You get to keep your pearls safe. The Hardside CS 60 was the one I first picked up and I was immediately impressed with the rigidity of the nylon shell - not stiff and crackable but not floppy either. No idea what it's made of but it looks like it would provide a great deal of shock resistance. The inside would be perfect for the Fujifilm X-100F that is their current premium compact camera - the back-to-front dimension of this camera's 23mm pancake lens lets it lie in there with plenty of room. The new Fujifilm X-100V coming out next year is rumoured to be getting a new lens, so we'll have to see whether or not it will fit. Privately, I think Fujifilm would be very wise to update the close-focusing capability of the lens on this iconic camera, but I really hope they don't change the focal length or the external dimension. If they do fiddle with the focal length let's...

I love the Joby people for thinking up the brand name " Gorilla Pod " all those years ago. Also the guys at Maine Wood Products who named their polyurethane adhesive " Gorilla Glue ". In both cases the products work very well and they are a gift to a column writer; there are just so many puns that you can make with the word and idea of " gorilla ". So lets got started and stop monkeying around...

I have to be careful with that title - I tried typing in Olympus Superzoom to the net to see what help it could be and it routed me off to old eBay sellers who have 35mm cameras for sale. Eek. I wanted to see if there was a comparable model from them that matched other major makers - something that had a small sensor but an enormous lens out the front. The sort of thing that cruise and safari tourists take overseas. It looks as though they might have had something like that some while ago, but are concentrating now on the things that can be done with their Micro 4/3 line of mirrorless cameras - and that they have just come out with a new lens to do it. The lens Carlos showed me is the Zuiko 12-200mm f:3.5-6.3 - possibly the longest zoom range lens for any mirrorless camera. It's the 35mm film equivalent of 24mm to 400mm. And we never thought of that in the day...