tourism Tag

Or you may prefer to deal with the Chip Paper Design Bureau. Or the Back-Of-An-Envelope Studio. All fine organisations who take modern concepts and wring them out like dishcloths. Careful they don't drip on you. Last post we speculated on Nikon's possible retro-styled APS-C mirrorless camera. Interested parties can google off to the Nikon Rumors site and read the details. Beware, however, as the digital images presented may have been done with more hope than science. Yellow Pad has taken the retro idea and applied it to a mythical camera - one made by the Flapoflex company. It starts with the basic Flapoflex 35mm camera they sold in the old days; the Falpoflex Beulah . This was an almost-Yashica design with semi-Petri overtones and the occasional outbreak of Ihagee-ism. It cranked through 35mm film behind a fixed 45mm lens and was cheap enough to be sold  everywhere from Abe's of Maine to Steamer Point in Aden. Innumerable Australian tourists sat with Flapoflex instruction books on their knees on cruise ships or package flights and tried to understand how to load film. The...

We are accustomed to seeing television coverage of the Tour de France - at least in normal years. Also Grand Tours of Europe undertaken to gain culture rather than sore legs - also in normal times. Even lesser locations have conducted excursions - the Tour de Manangatang comes to mind - and people stream out of the pub to either see or be seen. We need to institute a Tour de Photo event to boost our art - or at least to whip up a little trade. Several ideas have been mooted: a. Hold a long distance car rally/travelling gourmet/photo opportunity event on a set course round either the south west, the wheatfields, or out past Meekatharra. Set stages, timed runs, required photos, and local cuisine. As you get to each stage you download your photos of the last stop to be judged. 5 days on the road should see the average photographer shot out, crapulous, and with a number of traffic fines. b. Do exactly the same for the wedding enthusiasts. Imagine the delight of a bride upon seeing 28 strange photographers...

Upon the few occasions when I manage to chew through the straps and escape, I generally take a camera to record sights of interest. In some cases this results in a thousand images on a memory card. It used to be ten rolls of 35 mm Kodachrome or two pro-packs of Portra 160 but times have changed. I have exchanged worrying about X radiation on the film to worrying about running out of battery charge. Don't worry - the hit rate for good shots is still 10%...

The daughter has just returned from a trip to Japan. It was a short visit, but as she speaks a little of the language, an enjoyable one for her. As it was a quick decision affair, I grabbed one of the spare cameras to send her off with - a dear old Fujifilm X10 that has been serving since 2012. You've seen weblog pictures taken with it years ago here on your screen. My first worry as I sent her off with it was the battery supply - the camera batteries were small in those days and these have aged. But the Fujifilm charger could be configured for the Japanese 117V system and I figured out of five of them, at least two should work. As it happened, they all did, and there was never a time when electricity wasn't available. The second concern was the settings that the camera would shoot with. I dialled up RAW and jpeg initially and then saw that it would eat up a great deal of memory. So I opted for large fine jpeg and then...