studio photography Tag

And well I do. Large. Heavy. Complex. Precise. The do-all camera for advertising studio work and art copying in the film era.We're talking about a Mamiya RB67 here - a big single lens reflex set up with a close-up bellows, synchronised lenses, instant film back and roll-film holders - as well as sheet film holders with dark slides. All in pristine condition - legacy of a quasi-government agency that quasi-didn't use it. So all the juicy goodness is still fresh inside.Mamiya's have good lenses and are not too hard to use. Not as intuitive as a Hasselblad, but still do-able. And the internal bellows extension makes it - makes it the camera system for close-ups. As long as you do not see yourself scaling Bluff Knoll with it slung over your  sagging shoulders, you should be fine.Come see it and think up a good use for it....

Over the last few years the swinging LCD screen has become popular. Like other forms of swinging it has its hazards - my wife discovered this with a video camera that featured a screen that swivelled out to the side. When she rounded a corner suddenly with the camera and the screen hit the wall...

Either you are or you aren't. You'll know for certain and the people around you will have a pretty fair suspicion, but either way you'll need to come in and see us here at the shop to spend money.Well, that's what we are here for, isn't it.In this case you are either going to be a person who stands outside in the rain with a camera or a person who stands inside out of the rain with a camera.For the former, we recommend that you get yourself a packet of Op/Tec Rainsleeves for your camera and lens before you go out. You can get drenched as much as you like but have a little pity on the expensive electronics. For $ 9.95 you get two sleeves and you can cope with the wet.For the latter, we recommend a Datacolor SpyderCheckr 24 card and a set of LEDGO LED lights. Armed with the card you can balance out whatever light exists inside the home with the soft light of the LEDGO panels and do wonderful portraits and tabletop shots inside in...

I've just been asked whether it is better to buy things from the shop or make them yourself.  At the risk of giving the management asthma attacks, I have to say yes and no.Yes, it is better to buy your lenses and camera bodies from the shop rather than make your own out of wood. Artistry and skill only go so far when the material is white pine and the end result is a DSLR. We have seen a rather wonderful little wooden camera made by Leica but it is a toy rather than an working instrument.Likewise, knitting your own memory cards is fun but the failure rate is high - better to buy San Disk or Hoodman at the outset and save the needles for socks and gloves.The question gets a little closer when you consider accessories for a studio. A commercial light tent is still a good buy if you need to have a portable environment for product photography. You could make one yourself but you'd end up with a big monster that would not pack away when...

There are a dozen camera quick-release mounting plates in use today - but fortunately the main manufacturers and their industrial copycats have settled upon a few as standards.One notable one is the Manrotto rectangular PL200 plate - most bigger Manfrotto consumer tripods use this as the connection and it is a very good one. Another form is the Arca-Swiss plate used by that company, 3LT, Cullmann, and any number of other copyists. Unfortunately the Manfrotto rarely goes to Arca-Swiss.Until now. This black casting with the bubble levels and large locking knob is the Manfrotto MSQ6 - it goes onto a Manfrotto ball head in place of the standard PL200 mount and allows you to use all the Arca-Swiss mounts. There is a safety pin to prevent untoward movement of the plate and you can twist it tight onto the receiver. It will hold immense weights....

We recently added a range of " L's " to our shop. Users of some Sony, Canon, and Nikon cameras will benefit - particularly if he want to do landscape or studio shots. Or both together*.The "l's " are cast metal brackets that fit onto specific camera models to allow them to have an Arca-Swiss mont on the bottom. and the unique feature of these is that you can have the same mount out to the side.We've seen somewhat similar things from some on-line merchants - but they are generally solid castings without the adjustable features of these.The ProMediaGear bracket you see here is cast for the Nikon D7100 camera. The twin steel rails allow the side mount to be placed further from the side of the camera - in case you wish a higher viewpoint for the portrait orientation. This also allows those people who use the side mount as a way of slinging large flash units to move them away from the lens axis. Once you find out where you want to go, you tighten up the screws.Note...

Those of you who do landscape photography know the value of a good big tripod - you buy sturdy Manfrotto and Cullman outfits and valiantly haul them about the place looking for the view that no-one else has seen. You know it's out there because you've seen it in their photos...

Footlights at the theatre contribute a lot to the lighting - see the recent posting re. the Mozart opera. Now you can do the same as the big guys in your own home studio.Look at these humble AC flashes - they've been around for ages in the trade - I remember seeing advertisements for the in Fred Spira's day. They draw power from 240vAC and ca]n be fired from a standard PC cord or from their own internal slave cell.There is a power-on light to show when you are connected and a ready-light to show when the charge is sufficient. They fire out at about a GN of 45.Put them into outdoor floodlight sockets  ( See Mr. Bunnings for these. ) and they will synch along with your studio strobes for the authentic stage effect. Put tiny gels in under the plastic dome cover and you can make magic.Also useful for el-cheapo copying stand and macro work and can be rigged up for an extremely basic studio portrait setup. You're only limited by your imagination and paying the Synergy bill....

Did goe to the opera house last night and was greatley entertained. The subversive opera " Marriage Of Figaro " by some Austrian individual was sung and played by a number of local artists - to the entire satisfaction of the audience.A note about the audience - as with many music things that you go to, I noticed that they were all on drugs. Of course, given that this was a Mozart opera sung in Italian, the drugs were chiefly Mogadon, Lasix, and Metamucil...