Sony Tag

Like the nose you need not pick, the fight you need not pick is a dark place, best avoided. This can be difficult for photographers when the manufacturers of cameras would like you to become passionate about something. In most cases, the passion they would like to foster in you is the desire to spend money. Of course you understand that this refers to the recent introduction of 24 x 36mm sensors into mirrorless cameras...

Well, the proof of the pudding is in the eating. The proof of the lighting is in the shooting. And whether or not the new Sony HVL-F60RM looks like it is too big for the Sony Alpha 6300 and the 30mm f:3.5 lens or not, that's the rig that goes to the museum today. The Air World museum is a new venture. It's been erected just west of the Wet Dog Regional Airport in central Alberta - the old RCAF Wet Dog station. The Canadian Deprtment of Transport runs it now and they leased the vacant land to a private operator. It's still being completed, but a few of the exhibits are being moved in - they dismantled the old RCAF control tower and re-erected it as a display along with the vehicles they had left over. The museum halls will ultimately house a collection of Canadian aircraft - civieian and military - and hold air shows in the summer months as a tourist attraction. At least out in the prairies they won't have a parking problem. Hotel and motel accommodation in...

The Sony HVL-F60RM made this whole week. It was the product that leapt off the shelf into my hands as soon as I saw it - because big fancy flashes are the sort of thing that I want to see in every manufacturer's range of products. Sneer if you like, but I have always regarded a flash as an essential tool for photography  - inside and out. Whether it's the fixed flashes of emplacement in the studio or the battery-powered field guns, I want to see bursts of light I can depend upon to go where I want to see something. And I want my camera to work with that flash in the easiest possible fashion. Before you assume that's just advertising bumf, consider: a. You need to be able to fire a flash on the camera full-bore straight out. Sounds simple but sometimes you need that deer-in-the-headlights look. Then you need to run. b. Sometimes you don't need full-bore - the TTL mechanism lets the camera and flash decide what to do when you don't know or don't have time to do mental...

The Alpha 6300 camera is not a new camera in Sony's terms. New in Sony's terms is whatever is behind the green door and is going to be released at the next trade show. They have a wonderful variety of new, and if you are a fan of it, you can always anticipate something. But this is a tried product. It's an APS-C-sensor camera that is designed to do pretty much everything you want in a small sensor travelling machine. It is ergonomically nearly perfect - with a north-west viewfinder, tilting LCD screen, good RHS grip, and all the wheels you need to steer it all under the right thumb. It's E-mount, with onboard extending flash, and a dedicated Sony hot shoe. Built like a brick, and sort of square like one as well, it could ride in any traveller's bag  with whatever lens they though best suited them. Note that Sony use the wheel around the D pad as the second adjuster when you are in Manual mode. There's enough custom buttons to suit most sensible users. You can shoot 4K...

The Orange End Of The Shop is sometimes a little bit of foreign territory to me - many of the boxes are sealed and I do not get a chance to dive into them for the treasures. But occasionally the seals are opened for business and I get to see what's inside. This week I have taken out three diverse products to see if they are: Any good. Any good together. Any good for me. From the conclusions I may be able extrapolate to see if they would be any good for you. I have a long respect for Sony, though in my case it was hifi and radio gear that sold me on them - the early 70's were a burgeoning time for Sony and I got to use their amplifiers, tuner, and Trinitron colour television sets for several years. At the time, they had some of the best value for money audio gear avaiable here in Perth. The televison tube burned itself out in a few years - it was operating on a pretty high pressure - but while it worked,...

A recent post regarding the Fujifilm X-100F camera drew critical response from a reader - as much for my style of writing, I suspect, as for the content of the column. Well, to paraphrase President Lincoln, you can please some of the people all the time and all of the people some of the time, but...

How many times do we forget that pictures are all about us? What can we do to jog our memories? I was recently the guest of Mike and Jo at the Hope Farm guesthouse in York - courtesy of The York Society Inc. when I judged their annual photographic awards - and had time to consider this very thought. Thankfully, they were able to jog my photo senses back to life. Hope Farm is a somewhat historic building - many structures in York are - A doctor's farm that has become a well-appointed guest house and function centre. I had the unique experience of being the only guest in on the night and was very impressed with the standard and comfort of the accomodation. The morning brought a rather good breakfast: And I might have just sat there and  lapsed into a post-coffee coma if I hadn't seen the label on the table...

The phrase " f:8 and be there " was one often quoted to me as the formula for success in event photography. I think it was good advice in many situations where a preset camera and a lively eye were the only chance to get an image - the occasions where you couldn't predict when the action was going to happen nor where it was going to. These were days when you were going to have to get the job done in 12, 24, or 36 shots. Of course it was also the days of a glass flash bulb in a circular reflector and a focus locked at 12 feet, so the formula was easy to remember - it was goosing the film later in the darkroom that took the finesse. Well, now we can goose the ISO beforehand, let the automatic focus decide what we are doing, and reconstruct reality pixel by pixel with a Wacom tablet...