Sony Tag

A recent post regarding the Fujifilm X-100F camera drew critical response from a reader - as much for my style of writing, I suspect, as for the content of the column. Well, to paraphrase President Lincoln, you can please some of the people all the time and all of the people some of the time, but...

How many times do we forget that pictures are all about us? What can we do to jog our memories? I was recently the guest of Mike and Jo at the Hope Farm guesthouse in York - courtesy of The York Society Inc. when I judged their annual photographic awards - and had time to consider this very thought. Thankfully, they were able to jog my photo senses back to life. Hope Farm is a somewhat historic building - many structures in York are - A doctor's farm that has become a well-appointed guest house and function centre. I had the unique experience of being the only guest in on the night and was very impressed with the standard and comfort of the accomodation. The morning brought a rather good breakfast: And I might have just sat there and  lapsed into a post-coffee coma if I hadn't seen the label on the table...

The phrase " f:8 and be there " was one often quoted to me as the formula for success in event photography. I think it was good advice in many situations where a preset camera and a lively eye were the only chance to get an image - the occasions where you couldn't predict when the action was going to happen nor where it was going to. These were days when you were going to have to get the job done in 12, 24, or 36 shots. Of course it was also the days of a glass flash bulb in a circular reflector and a focus locked at 12 feet, so the formula was easy to remember - it was goosing the film later in the darkroom that took the finesse. Well, now we can goose the ISO beforehand, let the automatic focus decide what we are doing, and reconstruct reality pixel by pixel with a Wacom tablet...

I'll confess to a degree of longing to be an artist*. The heading image pleases me in a sort of impressionistic fashion, even though it was crafted with one press of a the shutter button on the Sony DSC-HX400V. The fact that I was at the top of the Wireless Hill observation tower and the camera was on full tele and stabiliser mode is  beside the point - it looks good. indeed the fact that it is as defined as it is speaks volumes. It looks as though the Zeiss plate on the side of the lens housing and the vaunted stabiliser system might be more than just advertising - look at the detail on the bird shot in the other direction. 500 yards if it was an inch, and no tripod. I do admit to rifleman's breath control, but the rest of it is down to the Sony circuits and the Zeiss glass. Birdtographers, please note. Architecture shooters, as well. The LCD screen was a godsend to shoot upwards like this. Tip 'o the week for LCD screens outdoors is to...

I have not done as much in the past with Sony cameras as with some of the other brands. It hasn't been prejudice - just opportunity. You see, Sony in many cases seal the boxes of their goods with a metal tape, and it was not done to slit that tape to extract a camera for testing. I had to wait until one of the demo units was put back into the storeroom to get a chance. This came the day before Valentine's Day. The camera I grabbed was the Sony Cybershot DSC HX400V - a super-zoom designed for the tourist market that combines an all-in-one design with a long telephoto and an active stabiliser system. It's the sort of thing that you get when you are going to Africa or Alaska - or want to take long-distance sporting shots but cannot carry the big DSLR cameras into a venue. ( WACA ) As with most of my tests, it was done OOTB ( out of the box ) with minimal resetting and fiddling - to replicate the sort of experience a...

I have been accused of being too narrow in my focus upon photographic equipment - basing my coverage upon my own prejudices. This is hurtful. The Flapoflex digital wet-plate camera is, and has always been, the pinnacle of engineering achievement, and I will continue to force it upon you. But I am not a mean man - I can recognise good design in the work of other manufacturers and it would be unfair not to point them out when they are discovered. Thus today's focus upon the Sony A7R. I think it's the A7r...

Don't be sad, Kamahl. You may be lonesome but doesn't mean to say that you have to have distorted music. I discovered these headphones in the video cabinet at Stirling Street while reviewing rigs for adding monitors and lights onto DSLR cameras. As most modern cameras take decent video, and some take extremely decent stuff, there is more and more interest in the sound component of the show. Most cameras will have a basic microphone somewhere and the better ones have provisions for not only better microphones to be feeding sound in, but for some form of monitoring of that sound as it is going in there - or at least as it is being replayed. That's the function of this pair of Sony MDR 7506 sound monitors. They are extremely accurate as well as being extremely comfortable. I realise that anyone who has worn cans in the Western Australian summer might doubt this, but insofar as you can put up with the hot ear syndrome, at least you will not have to feel like your ears are being crushed. That padding is soft....