security Tag

If you have a need or desire to spy on people or animals, come on down. We've got just the things for you. The trail camera concept is a one that a lot of people can share. Hunters, farmers, wildlife researchers, and security-minded individuals who may have valuable crops growing in inaccessible portions of state forests spring to mind. In all these cases the photographer cannot be on-site all day, every day - nor can they afford to keep the cameras rolling 100% of the time in hopes of seeing Big Foot, Yowies, or Judge Crater pass by the lens. A selective sentry is needed. This is where the Minox trail cameras come in. Minox has long been famed for tiny cameras and excellent binoculars. Now they have unattended photo stations that you can place in bushland and forests to monitor and record activities for you. The reason they work is better battery performance these days, micro recording media, and circuitry that can monitor activity over a specified area and start recording when movement is detected. A number of these cameras have black-LED...

Have you bought a fancy bit of photo gear any time in the past five years or so? If not, now is the time. The accountant made me say that. What I really was going to write was about the packaging - and what it tells us about the goods we buy. I was prompted to think about this by a recent trip to the hifi shop to get my old radio fixed. If I was young I'd have gone to Wanderlust in Murray Street and bought something cool and sleek - but I'm not and I just wanted the old razzinator repaired. The hifi shop was not sanguine about it - there is a dearth of both parts and servicemen at present. And the cost of the repair would have been more than replacement of the radio - even at hifi shop prices. I bit the wallet and bought a new radio - same as the old one but with Bluetooth, whatever that is. Then the fun. The salesman had taken it out of the box to show and had to put...

Let's face it - Christmas time is when people loose their heads a lot. Some do it by overspending or drinking too much or footling about at holiday parties. Some do it by surfing onto the rocks.  And some do it when taking photos. We've all bought a camera before - and in most cases it has come with a camera strap of some sort. The dear old Kodaks had woven cotton string loops and the even dearer old Leicas had very carefully-dressed leather ones. The SLR's had faux-leather bands and the DSLR's had faux-cotton tape ones. But they all had one thing in common: Eventually they sawed your neck in half and your head fell off. How many times have you came back from a photo safari just to sit there in the hospital waiting room with your head in your lap and the other patients giving you weird looks...

Some venues make a great fuss about cameras - rock concerts and Russian air bases for instance. This is because they do things in these places that they don't want you to photograph. Perhaps they would be more lenient if the bands or bombs were less harmful or more attractive looking, but that's just speculation. Accept that fact that your Kodak will get you into trouble. Note, Kodak also don't welcome cameras, but that's because they already have enough...

It is interesting to see the advertising that accompanies modern photo and audio gear and how much emphasis is put upon the portability, light weight, and small size of the goods. This is all good, when you are person who has to do the porting - it becomes bad when someone else elects to step in. I went to an event at a venue last Saturday and shared a deserted balcony overlooking the stage with someone else's equipment that was to be working unattended. Nothing sophisticated - a small video camera, tripod, and battery pack. I duly turned it on and off for the owner when the show started and stopped - and went on with my dance shooting in the meantime. It was a pleasant novelty to work a shoot separate from hoi polloi - up there in the semi-darkness. I was supplied with a drink and plate of Spanish rice and could not be happier. My files turned out well, and the stage lighting was surprisingly good - one of the few occasions when I haven't flashed anything at all....

I get to look at the dashboard for this weblog column and stare horrified at how many posts I've written. I'm surprised that I've had time to eat, sleep, or cement model airplanes together in the years that the column has been written. I took the opportunity to ask the mechanism to show me all the osts with " Tether Tools " in them.It turns out I've written about the products from this company ten times already. Well here comes number eleven. Note: I so admired the idea of their Tether Tools computer tray for keeping a laptop near you while you shot your DSLR in the studio that I pinched their design and made one for myself out of plywood several years ago. Nowhere near as elegant as the real thing, but it worked and proved that they were making a useful item. They have added no end of even better things since. These are two of them: a. Tether Tools Air Direct Arca Clamp If you're firing into an Air Direct wireless transmitter that will connect to your computer or tablet but...

And we do the rest. Even better than Kodak - you don't even have to press the button. Camera Electronic's shop in Murray Street is the home of the new Shoebox Service. Courtesy of some very clever machinery and programming , the staff at Murray Street can now turn your shoebox laibility into a digital asset. The deal is this - you take in your shoebox or envelope of paper prints - and they must be between 5 cm x 5 cm and 20 cm x 30 cm - and must be unmounted with no backing paper - and the staff carefully scan them for you. It may be the work of minutes or hours but the important points to remember is that they are not your minutes and hours and you are not going to be asked to pay for the time taken. You just deliver and then collect later. The prints coming in cannot be on big album pages - the staff will not unmount them. Nor can they be in those big cardboard studio frames. You'll have to remove them from...

They can be real abilities  - bolstered by practical hardware. And you can afford to buy it from Camera Electronic. Well, you can afford to buy Nextbase dash and rear-view cameras. They are most often fitted to cars or trucks to record who hits you from the front or the rear of your vehicle. Be aware that the cameras and recording circuits inside them are not human - they are not judgemental and they cannot be your friends. If you are the person who runs into other vehicles - front or rear - they will record that fact just as surely. They gather evidence and can probably be compelled to disclose it if need be. The best way to ensure that this is not harmful to you is to not run into or over other people. The advertising information on the back of the packaging is straight-forward enough - the cameras see widely before and behind and can run for extended periods of time. They can be voice-controlled by Alexa mechanisms for various functions while you keep your hands on the wheel. They...

I have permission to tell you this tale - from the principal in the story. A noted international photographer who lives in Perth worked hard all day - indeed he works hard every day because he is good at what he does and the people who buy photography buy it from him. Anyway, he went home in his car and unloaded it. But due to the hard-working day and the need to continue that hard work with the post-processing, he had a little lapse of memory - he left a bag of Profoto portable studio strobes in his car. Don't judge him - we all forget sometimes. He was awoken the next morning by the neighbour telling him that his car had been damaged. Indeed - a back window stove in by some random thief and that bag of Profotos gone...