Promaster Tag

I don't wish to alarm you, but many of the cameras in use today contain electricity. Not a great deal, in some cases, but enough to cause concern in certain quarters.The American Collection Of Concerned Physicians has called for the banning of all electricity - not only in photographic equipment, but in all aspects of life. They cite the troubles in Fukushima and point out that if the Japanese had been content to light their houses with rush lanterns they wouldn't be in the mess they are today. Of course, it is a little mean to scold people who have been caught up in a natural disaster, but the Collection has only their best interests at heart. And physicians scold good.For the photographic-minded, the electronic camera is the norm today - very few of the mobile phones that people use to snap pictures have enough space for a roll of film. The amount of electricity needed varies as the size of the camera and the features increase. The compact battery is a small wafer that will shoot 200 shots -...

I like table tops. You can take pictures on them, you can eat your dinner off them, and you can sleep on them after 18 bottles of beer. Actually, these days I can get there in 6, which means I can afford a pillow for the tabletop...

We reported the arrival of the new Promaster inkjet printing paper last week. When the place settled down on Friday we cranked two sheets of the Ultra Premium Metallic paper through the shop Epson 3880 to see what it was like.Metallic paper is a bit of a fooler - you look at the surface straight out of the packet and it looks sort of dull - the silvery sheen can seem  a little grey in normal light. it is an illusion - turn the part to the light source and it flashes back.So - the image size had to be adjusted in the printing program as these papers are the US Letter size - 8 1/2 by 11 inches. No real problem with Epson as there is a menu section that has all these sizes in a list - pick one and it will know what you want. As an aside, I was amazed that there should be such a variety of sizes all around a general theme...

Puff. Puff. Pant. Gasp.Just stocked the shelves with the new Promaster inkjet and darkroom papers. There are a LOT of new papers there - and a new size as well.Lett's start with the darkroom paper for analog users. Promaster make packets of Glossy and Luster  paper in 8" x 10" size - there are 25 sheets of paper in each packet. The packets are marked for a new wider range emulsion. The paper is shipped out of Connecticut so it may be Kodak ( but probably isn't ) or Oriental. The packets have been kept plain so be sure you read the label on the bottom - the two types look very similar.In the inkjet papers there has also been a commendable plainness in packaging but they have put colour coding on the boxes to let you differentiate between fine-art surfaces or materials and plainer photographic paper. The following types are in stock:1. Glossy2. Pearl3. Bright White Cotton4. Soft Gloss Dual-sided5. Glossy canvas6. MetallicThe intriguing thing about these new papers - apart from them being new - is that their...

The modern speedlight flash is a marvel. Gone are the days of a complex guide-number chart on the back or a dial that has four different circles in four different colours. The new flash may have nothing more than an on-off switch. It is nevertheless capable of full TTL operation with the computer in your camera and the resulting exposure can be balanced far better than ever we did when we were pacing off the distance between ourselves and the subjects.The trick is the dedicated contacts in the hot shoe - 3 for Nikon and 4 for Canon. They pass the coded signals back and forth at the speed of light. It is perfectly feasible to take flash pictures all day and not touch any of the controls. Yay.But when you need the direction of the flash to be different than stuck on the top of the camera you need to get that same control at a distance. Here is where Promaster comes in. They make double-ended TTL cords for both the Canon and Nikon systems - you can get...

The advance of digital photography has seen some remarkable trends - none more so than the photograph that slows a waterfall to a mist - or levels a moving sea. Or removes all the people from a busy city street. We mean the interposition of a very dark neutral density filter into the light path which permits a very slow shutter speed.The name that is on everyone's lips is Big Stopper - it is the catchy tag for the Lee company's 100mm x 100mm resin filter. It fits into their standard holders and drops 10 stops of light. I wish I had invented the name Big Stopper - it is the sort of thing that you can bandy about at a camera club meeting and sound really cool.Oh, would that you could go into a shop and buy one. Like into our shop, for instance. Because of their great popularity and the drought that has been affecting the English filter fields...

You'd think that the business of taking a portrait photograph would be easy, wouldn't you.Pull out your $ 3500 camera with the $ 2200 lens and turn on the $ 3000 studio lights and press the button. Then feed the file into the $ 2500 computer and the $ 2000 printer and add a $ 2 sheet of paper.$ 13,202 later and there you are - a lovely A4 picture to frame.But wait - you have forgotten that your portrait sitter has nothing to sit on. It is discourteous to tell them to sit on the floor or an old apple crate - you need to provide some better way of supporting them. Enter the posing stool from Promaster - adjustable up and down and 5-legged so that they do not tip over if you ask them to lean to the side. Black so tat it does not intrude visually into the composition - padded so that it does not intrude anatomically into the customer.A justifiable expense for the studio and a valuable piece of furniture. And chicken feed compared...

Now that the new legislation has gone through and photographers in Australia are legally able to take star trail pictures, waterfalls, and other long exposure subjects - with the appropriate license of course - more people will be heading out with their tripods and cameras.The problem of triggering the thing off without shaking it will still exist, however. The day of the old cable release has largely died - only the Fuji and the Leica enthusiasts will need the old mechanical type - but some form of electrical release is still needed by everyone else.You can do it with a simple switch - Hahnel make perfectly good wired releases, as do Nikon and Canon. The advantage of these is certainty of action and freedom from battery power. The downside is that some people tug on them or forget where they are in the dark...

Landscape photographers are romantics. They must be - they go a thousand kilometres to camp overnight in freezing bush so that they can get up at 3:30AM and hike through bush to a beachfront. Then they haul 500 Kg of equipments over wet rocks and stand there shivering while they are waiting for he sun to rise. They have $ 8200 sitting on a tripod in front of them on the slippery rocks and are waiting only an incautious moment to tip it into the sea.Then they drive a thousand kilometres back home and spend week of nights in a dark room trying the HDR the result. This seems clear evidence of either romance or madness.One of the symptoms of this madn...