Promaster Tag

A few nights ago one of our photographers was using a very good little flash to assist his nighttime shots. He got great results but I could tell he was frustrated with the time required to recharge the flash between shots. I wasn't surprised - the flash only operates on AAA batteries. It is s great little unit but it is asking a lot of small cells when you flog them through a series of shots.I find something of the same with my main portable flash - the Nikon SB 700. It fortunately uses AA batteries and I can put lithium cells in it, but even here there is a real problem of the cells getting hot as they discharge and somewhat slowing down. In the middle of a dance show I have to eject one set and let it cool on the floor while a fresh cold set go it. Granted you can get 600+ flashes from a set of batteries but you have to juggle things.I was struck by a thought about the design of the guns and...

Our Video Lady, Melissa, has popped this on the blog desk with the note that it is a very good idea for videographers who are using DSLR cameras and want to mount a separate monitor screen or microphone. A still photographer might fancy mounting a flash unit at an odd angle to fire down on a macro subject. You could slip a doughnut over it in case you get hungry during the shoot.The arm is 7" overall but you can also get them out to 11". The knob clamping the movement is smooth and positive - no creeping of the arm in operation. If you just need a particularly sturdy column up from the hot shoe, the articulated portion unscrews.Best of all is the reasonable price:  $49.95.Magic arm. Melissa-approved....

Have you ever seen those cans of dulling spray that studio photographers use to control reflections in silver or glass surfaces? It's sort of a thin waxy stuff that you can spray on then wipe off later. I forgot to take my can of it when I went to photograph the Jaguar XKS 120 at the car show. The alternative - a high screed of cloud - was inconvenient to arrange as I have not paid my account with the Meteorological Bureau. I still owe them for a rain storm in July and they won't give me any more credit...

Landscape photographers have a good deal in common with wedding photographers; they have to hike great distances hauling heavy equipment, their subjects that have impossible dynamic range, and they are never quite at peace with the weather.The first problem can be addressed by simply employing native bearers or wives. They carry the tripod, gadget bag, 14 different lenses, and water bottles on their heads and you simply stride through the dripping jungle or the local council gardens with them in a long line behind you. A solar topee is not absolutely necessary but it makes a nice touch. It is wise to determine if the natives or the wives are friendly before you put the topee on...

No, I'm not talking about the staff here at Camera Electronic nor am I aiming a dart at any of the customers. We all value leisure, but not enough of it will kill you dead and too much of it will kill you dead poor.What we are on about is the business of setting your camera to do its own thing and then tootling off to leave it to the job. Time delay for one shot is available on nearly all cameras - you select the delay and press the go button and then scurry around to be in the thing. I do it all the time in the studio  - not just for selfies, but to allow a camera time to settle onto a tripod and yield steady results. Nothing new here.Interval shooting is another thing altogether. We have all seen wonderful animations of flowers opening, clouds scudding across a sky, or investors besieging a ponzi financier's office. These are done by allowing the camera to take successive shots at spaced intervals. In the case of the flowers it...