Profoto Tag

Say what? Oh, no, we're not going to roast that old chestnut again. Climb the barricades, wave the HCB banner, and throw Leica rangefinders at the police. Would throwing Argus C-3's be more appropriate? They've got sharper corners. The age old debate about artificial versus natural light probably started when the first photographer put his cigar out in a pot of magnesium powder. It would have continued unabated through the tungsten and fluorescent tube era on to flashes - trays, sheets, bulbs, tubes etc. Purity, authenticity, sanctity, and artistry would have been invoked by one side to deny the chance for others to see in the dark and equally so by those who wanted to illuminate the world. In the last decade the fight has been taken out of the ring by the development of powerful amplifying circuits and noise-rinsers that let the nominative sensitivity of a sensor rise to fantastic heights. Starting with the Nikon D3 and continuing with their products - and those of other major makers  - the ability to photograph in places too dim to see in has become...

One of the iconic symbols of Hollywood - besides the sign on the hill - is the Klieg lamp with the barn doors. The Kliegs were an arc system and murder on the actors and actresses who had to bake under them - apparently the high UV could cause eye damage. " Klieg Eye "was a real thing. The lights had to be directed, even if the players did not. So there were swivel stands and control wheels and moveable shields to cut off part of the light pattern. The most efficient way to do this was with large movable flats but if you only needed shade a smaller area, the " barn door " could be swung into place. Whether they were effective or not depended upon their surface area. This form of light modifier then made it into the studios of still photographers when the studio flash systems were perfected. I've got two sets that clip onto my ancient Elinchroms and they are sometimes moderately effective. I found a better set on the back wall of CE in the Profoto...

" And he's using a new Profoto hand-held mobile C1 flash. " Actually he may be using the Profoto C1 or the C1 Plus, depending on how much flash he wants and whether he wants to add colours and accessories. The advent of the mobile phone as a viable camera option has left some people looking for a way to do the shooting in a more professional manner. The basic phone is fine for hold-it-up-and fumble-for-the-button stuff. Perfect for selfies and recording plates of food. But sadly lacking when it comes to portrait or product lighting. It's just hard to get decent lighting that is as portable as the mobile smartphone itself - hard until now.   The Profoto C1 and C1Plus are simple cylinders approximately 74 and 79mm in diameter respectively. They weight either 120 g. or 176 g. - not wrist breakers or rocks in your pocket. The simple one puts out 1600 Lumens and the C1 Plus emits 4300 Lumen. You can vary the colour temperature between 3000ºK and 65 They'll both do approx. 2000 full-dust flashes on a charge and recharge...

I'm going to write a column for you, not for me. Normally I just write on the stuff I want and you get to read over my shoulder, but in this case it's for you. In the Stirling Street shop mooching about for a topic, and the new Profoto B10 Plus was suggested. Thats the unit you see next to the B 10 in the heading image - the longer of the two. I knew a little about the B10 from a launch that CE did of it a while ago - and then brushed up on the basic specs from the Profoto site. Note: if ever you wanted to know about studio and field strobe photography, the main Profoto web site and modifiers catalogue will tell you. Be prepared to spend time, if not money, on reading the advertisement part of it, but concentrate on their careful explanation of what their reflectors, softboxes, grids and fresnels do. It is one of the best and most logical illustrated guides I've ever read - and has busted a few of the misconceptions about...

I have permission to tell you this tale - from the principal in the story. A noted international photographer who lives in Perth worked hard all day - indeed he works hard every day because he is good at what he does and the people who buy photography buy it from him. Anyway, he went home in his car and unloaded it. But due to the hard working day and the need to continue that hard work with the post - processing, he had a little lapse of memory - he left a bag of Profoto portable studio strobes in his car. Don't judge him - we all forget sometimes. He was awoken next morning by the neighbour telling him that his car had been damaged. Indeed - a back window stove in by some random thief and that bag of Profotos gone...

I asked myself this question as I shot a few reportage pictures for the recent Boxing Special at the Photo Live 2018. There were plenty of photographers around the ring with plenty of cameras but few of them besides me seemed to have flash guns in operation. As I am a relic, I wondered if the flash had become a relic too. It all started when the Nikon D3 cameras came into the shop in the 2008-2009 period. it seemed that you could boost the speed of the sensor to impossible heights and that no—one ever need use a flash any more. A couple of staff members and customers with the cameras were taking them into dimly-lit night clubs and returning with fabulously bright pictures. My cameras could not do these high ISOs without terrible colour noise so I settled for lower speed and speedlight flash. And worked my way through various combinations of good old flash, bad old flash, good new flash, and bad new flash. I'm about evenly balanced between the light and dark right now, but I have no...

Okay, let's cut to the punchline straight away. I want one of these. If you are a photographer who shoots weddings, shows, portraits, fashion, or editorial, you want one - or two - as well. Stefan Gosatti does all these things and he's just had a chance to test out the new Profoto B10 over the last few days. He's rapt with them, his pictures prove that they work like a locomotive, and he's spending some of his own money to buy some. He showed us how it all works last night at the Northbridge Hotel - courtesy of Camera Electronic and CR Kennedy. The unit has the classic Profoto mount and controls in a body the size of a large soup can. The style has the sort of Scandinavian slickness that we used to see with B&O and Sonab.  There's a classic Profoto glass diffuser on the front and the large illuminated LCD panel at the back. The lump on the side's the lithium-ion battery. The light stand mount on the bottom is detachable - there is provision to swing any of...

I am a little restricted this week in my typing, being reduced to the right hand and two fingers of the left one - there has been a slight accident in the Little Workshop* and it will be several weeks before the bandages come off. There may be some typographical errors in the meantime. I shall therefore use the facilities of Science and Industry and the spare time of convalescence to answer some questions that have arisen recently. To start with - how good are the portable LED light banks that have been flooding the market? How much light do they actually put out in comparison to other sources? What is the colour temperature of it? What is the spread of the light? Are they a viable alternative to flash? To determine the answers I have brought four different product off the shelf and tried them against a standard studio monolight and a speed light flash. The trials were done at night in the same studio environment that normally sees dancers or toy airplanes - in this case it is the slightly more...