portraiture Tag

No, We're not talking about another footballer's romance or a North Korean threat - it's the Lastolite Ezybox Micro - possibly the lightest of the large diffusers for speed lights. Certainly one of the easiest to put on and off. Speed light diffusers have a long history - all the way from those rigid plastic panels that you clipped above the Metz 45-series hammerhead flashes in the 1970's through to the strobist craze five years ago. There were innumerable things that attached to your speed light with rubber bands and velcro straps. Nearly all of them worked and nearly all of them were a pain. The ones that went on easily, came off easily - usually when you moved your camera from horizontal to vertical. The ones that stuck tight needed a welder's degree to attach and an oxy torch to take off. And the matter of needing a diffuser in the middle of an event shoot meant that both of these possibilities could occur at the same time. The heavy ones strained the joints of the speedlights - you would have...

Thank you for coming along to the Little Studio and being such a good photographic model. And thank you to all the people at Fujifilm Australia for letting me have time to try out the new GFX50s camera and lenses in the studio environment. It is my preferred milieu because it has controlled lighting and a coffee pot. And once I let the new medium format camera have its head - doing the thing that it does best - it proved to me how good it can be. The tabletop trial was not the thing - this camera needs more space between itself and the subject. It needs to be photographing fabulous detail in faces. And you need to be careful when you let it go - the detail it captures can be marvellous and terrifying at the same time. Dare I say too detailed for some occasions? If your purpose is to flatter your portrait sitters, and you are addicted to f:16 and smaller apertures, be prepared to be surprised. Also be prepared to have the sitters mad at you. You see,...

As a review of the new Fujifilm 50mm f:2 R WR lens I thought I would take it out of the model car studio for a change. Oh, I am sure it would do a fine job there, but the very nature of the focal length means that it would have less depth of field than the lenses already in use - and would not be the first choice. Instead, I took it to the local bird sanctuary and shot pictures from the observation platform. The first images were of the Variegated RFDS's taking off. These were snap shots - as soon as I arrived I could hear the noise begin and I had no time at all to turn the camera on, swivel, and capture the birds just taking flight. Interesting to note the speed with which the lens snapped into focus, and that with the AF point set to the lowest size. At this distance it is easy to know where to place the green AF rectangle on the Fujifilm X-Pro1 as there is little parallax to contend with.   The...

If you are going to be a professional press photographer covering the political and business scene you are going to have to have the ability to think on your feet, and think fast. You'll also have to have an eye for a situation as it develops - the rich and powerful rarely pause in their tracks to suit you - or if they do it is for extremely brief periods of time. The quick shot gets the page. This much was evident in the talk given at Shoot Photography last night by Attila Csaszar - a staff photographer for Business News in Western Australia. That's him posing with a copy of the magazine bannered with a portrait he took of the WA Premier. Not a surprise, that, for a business paper, but big news for the Leica enthusiasts at Shoot - because it was taken with a wide-angle lens on a Leica Q camera. The Leica Q is all wide angle and all Leica. You can't remove the lens but you can dial in three focal length outputs from it - with...

Get busy. The window of opportunity is about to shoot up and let you climb into a good thing. The Fremantle International Portrait Prize. Every two years the FIPP organises an on-line competition for portraiture. They receive entries, accompanied by a small fee, from all over the world and consider them in the light of several categories of work. Professional and careful judging, I might add - Judges who are prominent in the profession and knew what they are seeing. There is a long list of possible winners published to keep interest up...

Well I don’t know if Fujifilm X-series enthusiasts will be happy with the results from the Lawrence Liverwurst laboratories or not. For some it will mean that they need to buy a new lens and for some others it will mean that they need NOT buy a new one. To be frank, I LIKE buying new lenses and I recommend the practice to everyone I meet. Nevertheless, science is a hard mistress… Okay. The test with the modelling light on. The green rectangle is where the AF point rests. All three lenses were started up from infinity and fired when they finally found focus. The trials were repeated three times to give each lens a chance to do its best. a. The 18-135mm zoom. This is a general purpose lens that can do many things well, though it necessarily has a limited maximum aperture. When it was triggered it ran in and out for two cycles in one second and then fired. That's the feature image above. b. The 60mm f:2.4 lens is a sort of nearly-macro lens that is designed to do...

Way back in the 1960's I bought a book in a secondhand bookstore in Spokane, Washington, that was made up of Kodak pamphlets. These were loose-leaf style instructional treatises that explained how to use the Kodak materials of the day to do professional work. I thought they were the official word from on high. They were actually the official word from Rochester, New York. They made a million of them dealing with any and all aspects of photography. Some were arcane and dry and some were very entertaining.Later in the 1980's and 1990's I rejected all the principles that they taught - sure that I knew better. Besides, they spoke of films and processes that had been superceded - so how could they have any relevence? I foolishly gave the looseleaf binder full of pamphlets away...