planning Tag

A very good question indeed, and one that needs answering before you press the button rather than after: a. How many pictures do you need to document the event? If it is a human-wave infantry attack and everyone wants to have a souvenir to send home you could be there for a week. Ditto a school or big corporate dinner. Be prepared with enough batteries, enough chargers, more batteries, a mains lead, and another battery. Be prepared with enough memory and think whether you would be wise to commit it to a multiple of cards. Not only to back up the images, but to separate them out into easily-processed batches. At the very least decide what system of numbering you'll use for the shoot; start afresh, break it into batches, or just carry on with whatever the camera is doing at the time. This latter choice can be fraught. I did just this on an interstate hot rod shoot and the camera in use clocked up to the end of its numbering sequence and decided to quit. I had no idea how to...

Proof of concept is a very useful idea when you're a photographer - particularly when you want to come down to the shop and spend money - but can't think of what to spend it on. You are floating in a limbo and you need a lifeline. Every new photo idea needs to be thought out well, but after you've done all you can with coffee and scribbled diagrams you need to start making it real. I'm sorry to say that you generally can't design it 100% on a screen or a yellow pad - you need to block it out with pinewood strips, cornflakes packets, and expensive camera equipment. We don't sell wood or cornflakes but we may be able to help with the camera gear. You have a studio idea. It need a backdrop - we sell 'em. It needs a stand to hold the backdrop - we sell those, too. Lights? Yes. Camera? Yes. You provide the action. And you'll only know if it works when you give it a go. Be prepared to fail. With a bit of luck...

Go to your car. Start it up. Drive somewhere. Do your business, and drive back home again. Park it and go into the house. Note: This is not intended to encourage folly. Keep 1.5 metres away from the bumpers of concrete trucks at all times and wipe the dip-stick with hand sanitiser, even if he protests. And no driving past Rottnest without a permit. But consider what you do when you set off on a normal journey - you get into your regular car, do the normal things with the controls, and for part of the journey out and back are on very familiar ground. You do not get into the car and then decide what sort of petrol you need in the tank, what size of tyres to mount, what pressure to inflate them. You may consult a GPS monitor for some of the journey, but not when you're near home. If you are sensible you do not spend the journey envying or triumphing over other drivers in other cars - based upon whether your vehicle is the newest of the new....

In my daily routine of YouTube I try to include a session devoted to photography as well as one with scale model building. I daresay you are the same with your hobbies and interests. It makes a nice change from Facebook and the endless Trump and kitten videos. The host of the scale model show has a company in the UK that sells tools and supplies for model building - some of which are made in China. He's been concerned that the factory making a popular range of sanding blocks is closed now, and he's going to miss another window of production time for his stock. The situation is also repeated in Europe where a supplier of pigments is also closed. He says his biz is now on furlough until Christmas. Now you might say that the hobbyists just need to go down to their local Bunnings and get a few sheets of wet and dry and glue them to coffee stirrers...

Imagine that all the other photographers in Western Australia have disappeared. Vanished, never to return. Gone painlessly, to leave only you. You, the only person with a camera and a computer and an editing program. You with the only printer and stash of paper.  No more shops, no more seminars, no more camera clubs or conferences or product launches. No more art directors or TAFE courses or juried print judging live on the internet. No more photo walks. Just. You. Now...