Peak Design Tag

Nothing like a tortured pun to start the morning, eh? Well, read on - it gets worse. The Peak Design people have always had innovative ideas about slinging cameras. We saw them first in the era of the quick-draw holster camera rig - this was about five years ago - when the flavour of the month was finding some way to suspend a heavy camera from your belt or backpack strap instead of hanging it round your neck. Their offering was a two-part metal plate that sandwiched the belt and then accepted a dedicated plate attached to the camera. It actually worked, but like many such rigs, it was fiddly to set up and required a good degree of faith to hang expensive gear on while you clambered over rocks and bodies. And it didn't quite have the kewl factor of some of the other contenders. ( My favourite was the Mississippi Traffic Cop rig that one English firm put out. You got a Sam Browne Belt made with enough bulk to suspend a hawg laig pistol...

A little while ago I reported on a stylish messenger bag from Peak Design that featured industrial-strength closures combined with an unusual fabric colour. It was stylish to the max but imminently practical - a good example of industrial design finally intertwining with fashion. Well, if you need to carry more camera gear and want to carry it on a different portion of your body, have a look at the Peak Design Everyday 20L backpack. It looks as though you finally have something that need not be seen halfway up a mountain to look right - this one you can take round town. As an aside, I wonder who would need a backpack in town? Editorial shooters with lots of gear and a fair way to hike in the urban canyons? Wedding shooters who do not want to look out of place but still need to pack spare cameras, lenses, and tranquillizer darts? Food shooters who need to do their work in restaurant kitchens and might at any moment be chased by a chef with a knife? I tremble. Well anyway, the fabric and...

I am going to risk it. I know the ice is thin, and the nerves even thinner, but here goes: another review of a Sony product. Or rather, a product that can be used with a Sony camera… I have reported on Peak Design equipment before, and from the original mention some years back until now, my opinion of the brand has improved. I think it is because their design department have had better ideas and their manufacturing division has been able to translate these into good products. The Original peak Design product we saw in Camera Electronic was a belt holder for cameras - a quick release clamp that enabled you to put a camera on your shoulder strap or belt and then secure it with a click of a button. The CE staff at the time all got samples to go away and try - I demurred  - the idea seemed uncomfortable. Whenever I tried it I envisaged disaster if I was not careful how I mounted the camera. Remember I’m the man who dropped a Leica M3 with a...

Well I promised you the up-market Peak Design messenger bag and here it is: the Everyday Messenger 13. There is enough style in this one to satisfy any boutique bag buyer.The choice of fabric from which it is constructed might be thought modest enough - a medium-brown denim - but then you need to look into some of the more up-market clothing shops to see what they do with ( and charge for ) denim. This is not a pair of jeans.The basic messenger form with top flap is simple enough to think of but there are a number of design quirks in it. With the top flap down and locked, you still get a weatherproof zipper on top to allow access to the gear compartment. These used to be referred to as "stealth" opening by some makers, but anything that has a big zipper is not all that stealthy.The sides of the case are open to small compartments - one of which has a Peak Design strap peeking from it. I've no idea what they expect you to suspend...

Mirror-less cameras are becoming a way of art for a lot of us. Some choose them because they want a lighter package to carry - some choose them for the quick handling - some for their unobtrusiveness. I love mine for the vibrant jpeg images that shoot straight onto the web page.Every manufacturer of a camera gives the buyer a camera strap in the package. But many buyers shy away from these and look for aftermarket ones with special features - thus the Peak Design" Leash ".Is this a good one for you to take your mirror-less camera for a walk? Well look at the details:The snap-on camera connector that can be detached from the main strap for packing or studio use. Those Kevlar cords are internally coded so that if you ever do wear the tough little things out they give you a yellow and then a red signal for replacement.The strap is slick premium-quality webbing with an adjustable buckle in the middle.The camera can be attached by its integral lugs as per the regular maker's strap or you...

Sounds like a valet service at a fancy restaurant, doesn't it? Well, you have to do the hard work with this one, but it will be worth it.Carrying a heavy camera on a neck strap is fine, if you look like He-Man or The Incredible Hulk. They have the necks for DSLRs with battery packs and long zoom lenses. In fact carrying these all day is what turns the Hulk green...

In another of my weblog columns* I vowed to go out to every camera shop in Australia to look for a better strap than the one I got with my camera. I have sawed my neck half off with a heavy zoom lens and need something soothing while the glue dries on the vertebrae.This may be a candidate. The Peak Design people started out a few years ago with innovative camera holders that let you park you equipment on a belt instead of a strap - though you could sometimes combine the two ideas by latching the things onto backpack straps. They still make these sorts of camera docks but have also branched out into more conventional straps. Or are they all that conventional...

Manufacturers are always coming up with new and unusual ways to sling, attach, and deploy our camera equipment. Here in the shop we have at least 4 different independent firms who produce straps and clips, as well as those provided by the camera makers themselves.Is there a point to it all?Well, after buying one of darn near everything over the years...