Peak Design Tag

We normally don't promote a manufacturer's range of products with a picture of someone else's goods in the same advertisement - it certainly wasn't done in the golden age of Madison Avenue. They might have hinted about " Brand X" and " Brand Y " and made fake motor-car tyres out of plaster and wood to pretend that one was superior ( and they did...

Let the readers decide for themselves. My jury is still out on this one, and they went out about 7 years ago. The foreman just keeps asking for coffee and pizza. The judge is getting impatient. Way Back When the first of the Peak Design camera clips were introduced the distributors generously came round and gave each one of the staff a sample to take home. It was a lighter and cruder version of the product they sell now but it worked very much on the same principle - you clamped the receiver onto your belt, screwed the foot onto the underside of the camera, and coupled the two together. A small button controlled a safety catch that kept the camera locked in until you reached for it. Some of the staff members thought it was great, and still use theirs. I tried it for a while but found that having the camera at my waist made it difficult to bend sideways. I was never nervous about it becoming detached, as the engineering of the system was good, but the location didn't...

No, we didn't hire Mr. Metzinger to paint our heading image - his " Oiseau Bleu " is from 1913 and that's a bit before CE 's time. But we do have some cubes of our own at the Stirling Street shop: The Wandrd Camera Cube. This is listed as a bag insert container for their backpacks - but I suspect it could form a pretty good general carry case for round the town use or grab-and-go storage in the car. Peak Design also make a case they call a Camera Cube. This has thicker walls and more space inside for storage. I suspect you could pack an entire assignment's mirrorless body, lenses, and flash in there. Temptingly small for air travel...

I suspect that Peak Design made this bag before they decided what it was going to be used for. That's alright - many of the models I make and the images I take are halfway done before I know what they are going to do. Some sit on the shelf or in the hard drive for years before inspirations strikes...

You are not really a keen enthusiast photographer until you have done three things; stood at a seashore for 3 hours waiting for the sun to come up or go down to take an image that looks like a postcard - sneaked a box full of new equipment into the house unseen - and dropped a lens onto a concrete surface while changing it. Those of you who would like to see the exact spot on North Wharf where I dropped an F:4 collapsible Elmar in 1973 are welcome to attend the annual commemoration service. Expect weeping and wailing. We all do it - we all juggle two lenses and a camera body while on the move. We try to quickly replace one with the other on the camera ( and aren't we grateful that all modern digital lenses are on bayonet mounts...

That's the best kind of carnival trick - selling an empty bag and then running away before you discover there's nothing in it. Except in our case we need not run - the whole idea is the emptyness. I address myself to the Camera Electronic customers who travel - who take their cameras to holiday destinations on a regular basis - who pack more than they should while vowing to pack less than they need. And who then do it again next month. The inside of a suitcase can be a chaotic thing. It may start out well-organised on your bed at home but halfway round the world and halfway through the trip it looks like a bear's nest. Short of throwing everything out of the hotel window and emptying the mini-bar into the case, travellers need a solution to too much that is too dirty. The Peak Design Packing Cube is just such a solution. It's a deliberate pouch/bag system that will carry an amazing amount of material - either out on holiday or home to be washed. It's not padded -...

Nothing like a tortured pun to start the morning, eh? Well, read on - it gets worse. The Peak Design people have always had innovative ideas about slinging cameras. We saw them first in the era of the quick-draw holster camera rig - this was about five years ago - when the flavour of the month was finding some way to suspend a heavy camera from your belt or backpack strap instead of hanging it round your neck. Their offering was a two-part metal plate that sandwiched the belt and then accepted a dedicated plate attached to the camera. It actually worked, but like many such rigs, it was fiddly to set up and required a good degree of faith to hang expensive gear on while you clambered over rocks and bodies. And it didn't quite have the kewl factor of some of the other contenders. ( My favourite was the Mississippi Traffic Cop rig that one English firm put out. You got a Sam Browne Belt made with enough bulk to suspend a hawg laig pistol...