Olympus Tag

People ask me what makes my mind up about a product to feature here in the column - seeing as I am tasked with banging out a piece a day all week. Of course there are the promotional briefs from major manufacturers and the announcements of product launch days. These are all necessary to satisfy the urge for novelty on the part of the clients and the urge for money on the part of the management. I understand both urges, and am sympathetic. I go to all the launches I can manage as there is bound to be something to see and hopefully something to eat and drink. That satisfies my urges. But as far as the goods that just sit on the shelf without any especial occasion attached to them, it is really a case of sudden inspiration. As it is a photo safari into the wild warehouse, I suppose you could say the choice is just a whim away...

I mentioned the strange little symbol on the control dial of the new Olympus TG 5 yesterday. The one under the blue arrow: At first I though it was something in Klingon, but after I rotated it to the index mark to start the function I discovered that it is the macro function command...

That's a pretty bold statement. Not the what you see bit - the why you need it part. We don't set out to be dictatorial very often because it generally doesn't work. Photographers have their own ideas and will insist on thinking them. But read on - This is the new Olympus  Tough TG-5 that has just popped onto the display shelf in the Stirling Street shop. And it is a camera that I am delighted to have for a test run. Like all the waterproof and rugged Olympus cameras, it has a one-hand configuration - they realise that if you are going to be swimming or rock climbing you are only going to be giving one flipper to photography - you will be using the other one to save your life. Same as a sailor on a sailing ship or a man bathing a cat. Note the big strap attachment bar - and the fact that both the nameplate and the box illustration show the camera in a vertical mode. Olympus are not trying to make you into portrait photographers with...

Do you enjoy coffee? Do you enjoy mirror-less photography? Do you like to talk to Burke Flynn? Well you can combine all three in upcoming Coffee On Olympus events this year. These have proved popular in the past as Burke explains the operation of the new Olympus cameras like the Pen F and the OM-D  E-M1 MkII. There are more possibilities encased in these new bodies than you would think - all the way from increased image stabilisation and dedicated focus stacking and shifting to extensive image customisation. It can be too much for some of us to absorb just from an instruction manual, so the Olympus company has made Mr. Flynn available to help. He has the happy knack of converting a complex series of procedures to a simple workflow - and this makes it easier for the growth of the Olympus system. Fortunately for Perth photographers, Olympus is also firmly based here in the state with medical imaging and treatment systems - they have a large headquarters and a ready attitude to help people. You can bank on them getting back to...

Anyone who has eaten at a Perth pub has noticed that there are generally three things on the menu: a dish that is so expensive that it makes the rest of the stuff look affordable…a dish that is so cheap that you know it is going to taste bad…and everything else in between. If you are wise enough not to order fish surprise on Monday or vegan-free gluten salad at any other time you should be able to get along pretty well. If the price of a pint is the same price as filling your car’s fuel tank, drink petrol. Same goes with cameras and lenses. You can glance over the wildly foolish shelves to start with and marvel at the temerity of the manufacturer. Then you can look at the goods that are so down-market as to be subterranean. Then you can shift to the sensibly-priced section and actually get down to business. We all do this and the business gets down...

Flower enthusiasts and botanists - and fungus people - are all experts in their fields. No, really they are. They know what looks good and right and how to grow it or find it. As a result their photos can be wonderful art - provided they can do the technical steps necessary to capture what they can see onto the digital memory. I approach the thing from the other end - I know how to make the picture look good but have no way of getting the garden to support me in the endeavour.  I have succeeded in killing artificial plants… All this said, here are a few test shots taken in our front-yard flower cemetery and back-yard weed factory. The items were selected with an eye to test out the Olympus OM-D E-M10 hand-held as if the user was a complete fool in the garden. As if… Note that the camera and lens are perfectly balanced for hand-held macro shots. You support the lens with the left hand and poke the shutter button with the right thumb. Your third and fourth arms...

In space no-one can hear you scream. The same applies to your own photographic studio if you pad the walls thickly enough. It’s not the screaming that the neighbours mind - it’s the language. I try not to make the Little Studio into an F*** stop… But occasionally the cries can be those of delight - particularly if the planned shoot goes well. This week’s investigation of the reconditioned Olympus OM-D E-M10 was one of those times. The two models chosen: the 90’s-style chopped ’39 Chevrolet and the Toyota Toyo-ace tray-top. The former is a 1:18 scale model with the peculiar characteristic of throwing light everywhere and the latter is a 1:64 Tomy model from Japan. The idea was to see how the 12-50mm f:3.5-6.3 EZ lens would cope with the depth of field problem and also to see if the vaunted Olympus image stabilisation system actually works.   [caption id="attachment_33448" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA[/caption] Forgive me, Burke, for the word “ actually “. It makes it sound like I doubt the claims that Olympus make. But I am from Missouri when it comes...