Olympus Tag

The camera is an excuse to get out the toy cars and the toy cars are an excuse to get out the camera. It is probably the same with you - substituting landscapes or sports or wildflowers for toy cars. You might even be the family photographer who is always circulating at the parties. If you are, take heart - they may growl at you now when you make them look at the camera, but after a couple of decades those images will become precious. Just make sure you save the files in a number of places. If family members have been particularly un-cooperative at the holiday parties or weddings you can get your revenge later by Facebooking the worst of them and then demanding a ransom to hide them. You're the photographer and you get to be ruthless. The main feature that stands out in the new Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark III besides a model designation  that is far too long, is the improved user control system. Oh, they've added a bit more grip and a few more internal features with...

You can do produce any size camera if you try. Whatever the designer draws, if a maker can enlist a crew of eight people and a recovery vehicle just over the horizon, they can send it out of the factory door. If they are wise they will wedge the door tight so that nobody can bring it back in again. It's different if a manufacturer wants to make something that is going to be successful - because part of that success will involve real people operating it in real time. And the simpler the interface, the better chance that it will work. That is the principle around some of the changes on the new Olympus E-M10 MkIII. Look at the front - the new hand grip is much more comfortable and much more secure - it is paired with a larger and more effective thumb grip at the back.         Also note the clever engineering of the three adjustment wheels on the right hand side. They are somewhat similar in shape but have been differentiated in height to allow your thumb and fingers,...

What sort of photographer are you? There's a question that people answer in the shop in oh-so-many different ways. Some say good or bad. Some say they are an adherent of Brand A or Brand B. Some identify themselves by the subjects they like to shoot. Some say amateur or professional, and frequently they are right. Hardly anyone ever says that they are modest. Or moderate. Or minimalist. It is almost as if they are afraid that the sales staff, other photographers, or the camera makers will look down on them . " There, there, little fellow...

Boy, am I ever glad I decided to take the Olympus E-PL8 up to King's Park one Monday rather than the following Tuesday. Like the Wicked Witch in The Wizard Of Oz, I melt in the rain and there would have been nothing left of me but red shoes. [caption id="attachment_34612" align="aligncenter" width="600"] OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA[/caption] I was pleasantly surprised to find that I did not have to pay for parking, though I was a little nonplussed at the sign - back in the 60's the parking problem was more a case of immorality than illegality. But no-one got towed - or carried - away on Monday. [caption id="attachment_34608" align="aligncenter" width="600"] OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA[/caption] The Botanical Garden gate was new to me, and I was pleased to see the possibilities for the tourists. For those who might not feel it respectful to take selfies in front of war memorials, it provided a good backdrop - certainly large groups were posing and exchanging cameras all the the time I was there. Many were mobile telephones, of course, but that is the way of the world. [caption...

People ask me what makes my mind up about a product to feature here in the column - seeing as I am tasked with banging out a piece a day all week. Of course there are the promotional briefs from major manufacturers and the announcements of product launch days. These are all necessary to satisfy the urge for novelty on the part of the clients and the urge for money on the part of the management. I understand both urges, and am sympathetic. I go to all the launches I can manage as there is bound to be something to see and hopefully something to eat and drink. That satisfies my urges. But as far as the goods that just sit on the shelf without any especial occasion attached to them, it is really a case of sudden inspiration. As it is a photo safari into the wild warehouse, I suppose you could say the choice is just a whim away...

I mentioned the strange little symbol on the control dial of the new Olympus TG 5 yesterday. The one under the blue arrow: At first I though it was something in Klingon, but after I rotated it to the index mark to start the function I discovered that it is the macro function command...

That's a pretty bold statement. Not the what you see bit - the why you need it part. We don't set out to be dictatorial very often because it generally doesn't work. Photographers have their own ideas and will insist on thinking them. But read on - This is the new Olympus  Tough TG-5 that has just popped onto the display shelf in the Stirling Street shop. And it is a camera that I am delighted to have for a test run. Like all the waterproof and rugged Olympus cameras, it has a one-hand configuration - they realise that if you are going to be swimming or rock climbing you are only going to be giving one flipper to photography - you will be using the other one to save your life. Same as a sailor on a sailing ship or a man bathing a cat. Note the big strap attachement bar - and the fact that both the name plate and the box illustration show the camera in a vertical mode. Olympus are not trying to make you into portrait photographers...