Nissin Tag

Ever see a Speed Graphic or Crown Graphic press camera - or any of the other US or British cameras of the 40's and 50's? Note that every one of them seems to have two things in common - a big silver handle flash on one side of the camera and Jimmy Olsen behind it. Golly Superman! The big silver handle contained as many " D " cells as they could cram in as a way of providing enough electricity to fire the big press flash bulbs. It could also provide synchronising ports for cables and a button to trigger a solenoid on the shutter. Whatever you were doing with the other hand - focusing the camera, pulling a dark slide, or fighting crime, the handle gave you a massive grip on the massive camera. The users decided which side they wanted to hang on to about evenly - the handles could be slung either left or right. Even when the smaller Leica-style rangefinders moved in for some press work, there were big handle flashes to let you keep it all in...

I am amused these days when every product or service I see is preceded by the letter "i " in lower case. It is put there to suggest that the object is considered to be intelligent. I'm prepared to believe this, but would like to point out to the manufacturers that this does no good at all when the purchaser 's name starts with " D " for dumb. My first name is Dick...

We are not going to suggest that the clients of Camera Electronic should come in to buy stuff in a sozzled condition - far from it. It has been done, mind, but it was not a pretty sight to see. And it is hard enough getting the sales staff down off the top of the cabinets with a hockey stick at the best of times.But there is something to be said for the concept of the cocktail hour consultation. Pull up a shaker and I'll explain.Cocktails are made from a mixture of things - liquors, essences, fruits, mixers, etc. They can be very complex or very simple - provided the ingredients are good, they nearly always succeed. Okay, the pickled herring martini was a general failure but we still sold some in Holland...

Dang. Someone invented the better lighting mousetrap - and now presumably are having to resurface the pathway up to their door in anticipation of increased traffic.Mag Mod have finally made a set of speed light modifiers that are worth using. The secret of their appeal is no secret - they have unique shapes and they attach to the speed light flash guns easily.Note: easily. Also firmly. Firmly, as in use them in the rough and tumble of professional shooting and not have them fall off. And no more velcro bands or sticky tape panels.The basic unit is a rubber adapter housing that stretches over the head of your speedlight. I used a Fujifilm EF-42 but I daresay the ban would go on any Canon, Nikon, Sigma, Olympus, Leica, or Nissan flashes just as easily. It's a darned sight tighter than any velcro band ever was.On the outer edges of this band are imbedded small but powerful magnets. All the accessories that stick to the front of the adapter do so by means of their own magnets - so the things...

Users of older Leica cameras will remember the complicated procedures required for flash usage in the film era. There were quite a few of the screw-mount Leica bodies that started life with no synchronisation and had it added later with marvellous attachments that clamped onto shutter speed dials and then closed contacts with spring levers and rotating arms. Users could dial in all sorts of delay times and I'll bet nearly every one was wrong...

Progress for the Strobist - power for the Pro.Nissin has just supplied a very good idea that will please Sony, Nikon, and Canon shooters:Their new Di700A flash is packaged with a dedicated Air 1 wireless transmitter that does TTL as well as full manual control.For dedicated speed-light users the two turning points are the TTL and the radio transmission mode. These make it possible to have a truly portable studio flash system that is not in a studio...

All Hail The Mighty Fong!This universal diffuser claps onto the font of any speed light flash to diffuse the light and fill it into the shadows of your picture.No more Panda Eyes on your bridal portraits and no more couples caught like rabbits in the headlights at parties. Soft fill in that goes out to the edges of an interior - but doesn't burn out the main subject.The new universal velcro strap secures it to any flash - I know because I just got up from the laptop right now to try it on a new Nissin i40 - and you have a far better fill than could be obtained with the little box diffusers.We've got a stack of them in store right now....

Well, it works.I have just given the new Nissin i40 flash a run with the little Fujifilm X-10 that takes the editorial photos for our shop - and i am impressed. Impressed enough to fork out some of my own money for one.It slotted onto the hot shoe and went into TTL mode flawlessly - no big surprises there. Tilt, auto zoom, all the bells and whistles we expect from modern flashes.Then I turned it to Manual and shot the sequence of flashes you see in the photos. 1/128, 1/16. and 1/1. But you see how it worked? - no cord connection - the flash operates as a slave from the X-10's little weeny on-board flash.So, you can hold it in your hand, shoot your main from the end of your arm, and have the little on-board peeper as a fill. Or put it on the shoe, dial it up to 1/1 and do fill flash out in full sunlight. With the X-10, 20, 30 or X-100 series cameras you can synch up to at least 1?100 - I tried...