Nikon Tag

You may be forgiven for thinking that the Nikon F camera with Photomic T finder and Nikkor-S 58mm f:1.4 lens shown at the top of the page has been dropped into a gravel crusher. Possible, but it's likely that it got that way from harder use - newspaper work with the local photo-journalists. Duncan Dodd acquired it to add to his collection and brought it along for studio illustration - and we got to test it out against a modern digital lens. Well, the Nikon F was a battleship of a camera - hard body and sharp edges, and design decisions carried over from the rangefinder Nikons of the 50's. They look crude now, but they are still working now...

I've kept my promise to the WA Nikon Sales Manager. I have not rung him up every hour asking for secret details about new Nikon products without mirrors. I have not burgled his office nor gone through his emails. I have not sat in the bushes opposite his house and glared at him through the leaves. Not that I haven't been tempted, mind. But I've realised that the best way to find out what is coming out is to wait until an official launch. That, and haunting the rumour sites and YouTube clips. You can do a great deal of good, and even a greater degree of bad, with internet speculation. But it doesn't help to frazzle the rep. The photographic world changes constantly - I did not realise how much until I entered the trade again in 2008. Quite apart from the catch-up needed to go from sheet film to second-generation digital, there was an almost weekly addition of new equipment and rising specification in the major brands. The designation of " major brand " also shifted perceptively while I watched,...

We've just seen the closure of the 100 years website that the Nikon corporation drew up to celebrate their anniversary year. It was worthwhile looking at as the corporation had the best stocks of information about their products over that time - and, of course, an immense number of a landmark productions in the time. But what was their biggest landmark for you - what was it for me? Did we have the same experience of the company over that time? I first encountered the brand in 1966 - when I took up amateur photography in high school. It was far beyond my reach financially, but I had no idea why...

Recently at the Camera Electronic Photo Live 2018 Friday night special event - the boxing spectacular - someone used their imagination in a rather dramatic fashion. Of course they had access to some of the most imaginative equipment in the business, as well, but let's remember that the buttons and the lenses only do what someone tells them to do. You've probably all seen historic boxing photos that have been taken from a vantage point up above the ring. In the old film days they would suspend a motorised 35mm camera with a wide-angle lens up there fixing its focus on the canvas. They might have been able to rig a flash on the camera or at least wire-synch it to other strobe lights up in the gantry that hangs over the ring. It was a complex rigging job and somewhat uncertain...

I was delighted with the Tamron Tap-in Console when I opened the box in the studio. I don't own a DSLR or a Tamron SP lens, but the look of this accessory is reward enough - it's like having an electronic hockey puck with a USB interface, eh? For the people who use the higher end Nikon or Canon DSLR bodies and want to pair them with compatible Tamron lenses, this "hockey puck" acts as an interface to do a number of things: Put in firmware updates that may be issued by Tamron. Put in correction factors for individual lenses in regard to auto focusing at three separate distances. You have to determine the best correction numbers by separate test but once achieved you can lock them in via Tamron website commands. Put in auto-focus limiting modifications if you want to change the range of this. Decide whether you'll need MF and optimise the focus ring operation. Optimise how the stabilisation system of the lens acts according to your own needs. These are valuable things to control - but you'll have to...

And about. It was no good sitting in a studio shooting P-38's with this camera and lens. It'd do a perfect job insofar as the depth of field at 50mm will allow. Better to take it out into the wider world and see what a standard lens on a sensor of this quality could find. Before I went out, however, here is the Dirty Blue Bird. ETO P-38 PRU in artificial haze and turbo supercharger discharge. Never mind expensive kits - $ 19.95 and a week's work. The venue selected was nearby - the RAAF Museum in Bull Creek.  It has semi-darkness, as befits a museum, back lighting from windows high up in the hangars, and a variety of colour intensities and surface reflectances - all the way from service matte to museum gloss. Plus colour temperature swings on a semi-cloudy day.                   What better way to test a camera that has extremely good ISO performance, large sensor, and a matrix meter. Plus there's an f 1:1.4 lens on the front. If you're a nervous flyer you can wait at the souvenir counter...