mirrorless Tag

A recent column that dealt with stolen cameras seems to have garnered a great deal of interest - so I've decided to add some thoughts on the matter of further security for photography.The original column mentioned stolen cameras and suggested increased security measures for equipment inside cars. Now it is the turn for the same security inside the home.A. Equipment safety. You may have anywhere from $ 400 to $ 40,000 invested in cameras and lenses. If you put them into camera bags and cases and then put those cases inside the wardrobe your security level is that of the MDF board on that wardrobe. About 3mm of pressed wood pulp. Perfectly adequate to protect your 1980 safari suit against moths but no help if a burglar with a habit breaks in and looks for saleable items.Look up locksmiths and safes. If you have space in your home for the wardrobe, you have room in the wardrobe for a safe or storage cabinet. It doesn't need to be Fort Knox - it just needs to deter the casual criminal. I've...

C.R. Kennedy recently equipped Bob Lichfield with a new Pentax K-1 camera and several lenses so that he could make a professional's assessment of it. He was itching to buy one so the choice of tester could not have been better.He took the camera out to Whiteman Park to capture the low morning light and the kangaroos. The results, as shown at the Camera Electronic launch night on last Thursday week, were nothing short of spectacular. Extremely sharp and well-coloured with minimal noise. Heck, I couldn't see any noise at all. not surprising with a full-frame sensor like that and a new processing engine.*But he pointed out that there is a great deal more inside that camera than he was able to elicit in the weekend he had it. He did nature shots, landscapes, architecture, stitched panoramas, and one astro shot with it but had to confess that the only way to succeed with that was to read the manual and pester the State manager of C.R. Kennedy.Did pretty good for a weekend - but then he has the advantage...

Digital shooters can be be spoiled by the wonderful developments that the major manufacturers have made with camera sensors and electronic circuitry. As time has gone on the cameras have been given the ability to make pictures under darker and darker conditions with cleaner and cleaner results. In many cases digital shooters have never thought to turn on any additional artificial light. And many have eschewed it as being somehow "impure"...

If thou hast a Sony E-mount camera and wouldst see in the dark, hie thee hence and look at the Mitacon f:0.95 lens that has just arrived.It be called the 50mm f:0.95 Speedmaster and presenteth itself in what may well be the most imaginative case we have yet seen. Even the Japanese - normally the masters of packaging - have not done something as artistic as this. Definitely not a cardboard box that you toss in the bin...

Those of you who follow the Fujifilm bandwagon will be delighted to hear the news - a new camera is announced today!The shape of the new Fujifilm X-T10 may remind you of the Fujifilm X-T1. No surprise that - it has been developed as a complement to that fine camera. The viewfinder window is in the middle and many of the camera controls on the X-T-10 will be i similar places to the X-T1. But what will be new?To start with, a new AF system - in addition to the normal 49 single points for focussing there are Zone and Wide.Tracking modes that use 77 focus points. This means that there can be groups of focusing elements on the sensor that can track and predict the movement of a subject and cope well with it - whether it is moving from side to side or to and fro.You can boost ISO setting to a very high level - 51200 - and still ge strong blacks and low noise.You can get a very fast view of the world that you are...

I am frequently asked about the law as it applies to photography - both the privacy laws and the copyright laws. As far as I can see if you are under 30 there are no rules - and if you are under 30, wear a fluoro Hi-Vis vest, and drive an old Mitsubishi Magna, you are excused road rules as well. Get out there and go mad...

Dear Camera Designers,Thank you for the new features on my camera. I appreciate the Automatic setting, the Intelligent Automatic setting, and the Disturbingly Prescient setting. Last night my camera got out of its bag, went down the street, and took a picture of the showers at the Nurse's Quarters all by itself. Tonight I am deadlocking the door.Thank you also for the smile recognition feature, though I must admit that mine seems to have died - I turned it on at it to the last family picnic and the camera refused to fire.The little pictogram in the special settings menu is my favourite - the one that has the cocktail glass. I look at it fondly every afternoon about 5:00. I feel you have come to understand me.Now that we have these ideas realised, I would like to suggest a further improvement in your design - the provision of a small and effective wireless flash trigger in the accessory battery grips of your DSLR and mirrorless cameras.Already one manufacturer has pursued this in red-and-white terms for one model of their...

All Hail The Mighty Fong!This universal diffuser claps onto the font of any speed light flash to diffuse the light and fill it into the shadows of your picture.No more Panda Eyes on your bridal portraits and no more couples caught like rabbits in the headlights at parties. Soft fill in that goes out to the edges of an interior - but doesn't burn out the main subject.The new universal velcro strap secures it to any flash - I know because I just got up from the laptop right now to try it on a new Nissin i40 - and you have a far better fill than could be obtained with the little box diffusers.We've got a stack of them in store right now....