mirror-less Tag

Sometimes I go into Camera Electronic and ask what's new - and sometimes they tell me. So far it has not taught me a lesson, because I keep on asking. New is not necessarily good or bad - it is just new. A fresh page in the big book of photography - a book that we get to write ourselves. In some cases I end up wishing the pages had been stuck together. Like today. I discussed a question of professional responsibility with one of the staff members - a person who is very responsible indeed. I was sympathetic because I remember being in a responsible position for forty years myself, and it frequently was a pain. Not on account of what I could or would do, but on what other parties wanted to stick onto me. I had a statutory board and a coroner at the top of the professional mountain, looking down at me, and it was no fun. A bit different in business, as there was generally only the final line of money to deal with - money desired, lost,...

I opened the box of the Fujifilm X-A5 camera expecting something of a Po' Boy camera - an entry-level device that had been cut down to the bone to capture the cheaper Asian market. I could not have been more mistaken in my life.   The camera body is smallish - in keeping with the form of the other X-A series cameras. The lens is compact - again looking to keep the overall package small. There is no eye-level viewfinder. And after that it is all luxury goods and a fabulous technology - made all the more so for me as it is a camera that is well suited for studio shooting. The top plate feels like metal.   Here's the basic form of it. Tilting CD screen, standard RHS controls, in-built flash head, and as many modern eye-catchers like 4K and WiFi as you would want. Fujifilm have thankfully kept the pop-up flash tube but also included the full suite of TTL features in the hot shoe mount. A lot of the controls have been stacked onto the touch screen, but...

Anyone who has a spouse, children, pets, employees, or subjects will know the frustration inherent in the situation. No matter what you may think of them, they sometimes insist on thinking for themselves. Orders may be formulated and transmitted, but that doesn't guarantee that they will be understood. Even if they are, there is a good chance they will not be obeyed. If this sort of mutiny occurs in the military you can throw people in the stockade or brig - if it occurs with employees you can fire them or lock them in the storeroom. If children are disobedient you can send them to their room without dinner - and if you are a bad cook you can send them with extra portions. If your pet disobeys you can just sit down and burst into tears. But what do you do when your camera - a borrowed one - refuses a lawful command? This was the case when I tried to make the Panasonic DC-G9 with the 25mm f:1.7 lens take pictures of the RCAF Wet Dog set. I was banking...

I first encountered this new Panasonic mirror-less camera at a recent blue blood moon shoot down in Rockingham. Sam Perejuan from our shop had one with a long Panasonic lens on it ready for the rising of the moon over the fertiliser works. He took shots through the heat haze and we were both amazed at the detail of the wobbles in the moon's outline as it rose. Sam wasn't using a tripod, but the extremely effective anti-shake system of the camera meant that the whole thing was sharp. I was seriously impressed. Keeping that in mind, I checked out a camera body and a Panasonic 25mm f:1.7 lens for the studio - I knew that the micro 4/3 sensor size would regard the 25mm as a standard focal length for the camera - just as the 35mm Tokina lens did on the Nikon D7500. The idea of a " standard " lens is important for my tabletops, as it simulates what might have been done with the 35mm camera for full-sized subjects. My choice, and sometimes I do use shorter...

Thank you, Mr. or Mrs. Canon. Thank you for thinking like I do, and more often, too. Thank you for doing the things on the Canon EOS M6 that I think are a good idea. I say this pointedly, as I have sometimes taken gear out of the box to test at the studio and regretted it. Not that the cameras were bad, but they sometimes had such arcane menus, simplistic controls, or trendy features as to baffle the mind - or at least the mind that had to get them back to the shop in under a week. I can truthfully say that I did not have one bad experience with the EOS M6 when I pointed it at the new model airfield. I turned the LCD exposure visualisation off so that the screen did not become dark during focusing, I turned the shutter to 1/250 second, and the aperture to anywhere between f:16 to f:25. I am led to believe, looking at the specs on a Canon website, that it may well go to f:38...

This column will come to you far enough into the new year that we won't have to go over the old chestnut of New Year's Resolutions - and let's face it - we get enough resolution out of our lenses as it is. If the NYE party left you with a bit of residual chromatic aberration you'll know to take more water with it next time. In the vacuum of time between the major celebrations I checked a Canon mirror-less camera out of the shop stocks and had a close look at what this manufacturer has done to catch up to Olympus, Sony, and Fujifilm. I use the phrase advisedly, as I realise that company prestige is involved, but Canon Australia need not get angry at me - I have a number of good things to say about their product. The example I grabbed is the Canon EOS M6 kit with a silver body and a 15-45mm lens. It has stablemates in the mirror-less lineup - the M3 and the M5 with different characteristics. I chose this one because it has a...

Some photographers are luckier than others - they get more bites at the cherry. Whether this means they break their teeth on the stone in the middle is another matter, but every good thing has a bad side. The shooters who do not get that second, third, or fourth bite are the ones in the sports, news, and wedding trades. What they see, whether it is at a car-race track, a political riot, or a church aisle is seen once, and needs to be captured at once. They can sometimes increase their chances of getting it by using a camera that will shoot quick bursts of continuous shots - they sort it out later on an editing desk, looking for the peak action moment. But even given this technical help, nearly all the successful ones will admit that there is a great deal of skill in the timing of what they do. Note: The equipment they use plays a vital role in whether or not they can actually get the one-off shot. It must be capable of fast multiple shots, as we said,...

I jumped ship some years ago from the Nikon DSLR system to the Fujifilm X system. The reasons I presented to myself were partly practical and partly fanciful - it was the sort of thing that many enthusiasts do without any really serious thinking. I thought that I was going to get a system that would give me the same images as before, but with smaller and lighter equipment. I convinced myself that it would be a good thing. The opportunity arose - I was working in the main shop at the time and Fujifilm prices were pitched at a deliberately low level to capture new business. Did I change over completely? Yes - selling out all the Nikon gear over a period of a couple of years. I invested the money obtained into new Fujifilm bodies and lenses. Did I lose some good equipment? Yes - the two D-300 camera bodies were real workhorses and the two SB 700 flashes were state-of-the-art devices that I had learned to control very well. Even the SB 600 was pretty darned sophisticated. I was getting...