mirror-less Tag

" Push The Button, Max! " There was never a better villain than Jack Lemmon in " The Great Race ". Nor a better henchman than Peter Falk. I think they would have made fine camera reviewers. Before you power up your new Canon EOS R camera you need to fill the battery. Thankfully, Canon have not charged off into the wilderness with a new battery size for this new system - the LP-6, battery charger block, and figure 8 cord are totally familiar to Canon DSLR users - and if they already have a collection of LP-6's they are set for life. I have always admired the way the Canon blocks report how far the charge has proceeded as they are working. Once loaded - and a card inserted in the slot...

This week I finally come to grips with the new Canon EOS R camera system - or at least with one example of it. Enough stock has arrived to allow me to take one back to the Little Studio and give it my own workout. The camera is packed well. Don't laugh at me for praising the box - there have been other things in other boxes in the past that have caused serious grief. This one sets out the goods in three trays on three levels and adds additional packing for the most delicate parts. The most interesting bits are often the smallest. Note the computer harness block. The Canon EOS R will be capable of tethering to computers - and note that Camera Electronic has a full range of Tether Tools cables to assist with this. It is a measure of the determination that Canon is showing to make their new mirror-less system a fully professional one. It's a sleek and handsome camera, reminiscent of the shape of the DSLR but without the depth of the mirror box. The...

Like the nose you need not pick, the fight you need not pick is a dark place, best avoided. This can be difficult for photographers when the manufacturers of cameras would like you to become passionate about something. In most cases, the passion they would like to foster in you is the desire to spend money. Of course you understand that this refers to the recent introduction of 24 x 36mm sensors into mirrorless cameras...

You've got the bully beef or the mutton stew. And cans of plum and apple jam too. There's a tablet of salt and a biscuit of wood And you end up feeling fed-up good. Or you can go to Margaret River and have a different sort of MRE Experience. Here's a few bits of the local flora that I found on a recent weekend trip. I was fortunate in being able to poke around a bush track that abutted a forest. Every district has someone who is interested in it - a long-time resident or a zealous newcomer - and who is generally shyly bursting to tell you all about it. The thing is to find them and to give them a chance to do it. It may involve a little money, but the expertise you get in your exploration will make the expenditure well worthwhile. Any day you learn something is a good day. Expect to get dirty in some places, and tired in many more. You'll generally have to walk it some part of the way but if you pick the right season to...

Natural skeptics like myself generally hold that something is real only if you can touch it. This holds for most things - you can confirm stuff for yourself with a few sensible exceptions; nuclear warhead cores, rabid dogs, and the Canadian prime minister. We don't want to carry skepticism too far...

I have just been watching some of the live streaming video from the Nikon company regarding their newest camera system - the Z -mount mirrorless cameras. The presenter is quite precise in his speech if a little general in his words - this is to be expected on a professional level. Ever since the inception of the mirror-less concept - making a digital camera with a decent-sized sensor and interchangeable lens system - there have been increases in specification by other makers. You might liken it to the campaigns of the mid forties in the Pacific. First small gains, then major advances, then a stranglehold on the photo market. Then someone drops something big - full-frame big - on the market and eventually the heads of formerly-imminent photographic companies have to admit that the commercial war has not necessarily gone to their advantage...