medium format Tag

What, you may ask yourself, could possibly cause normally sensible people to start fighting in the middle of the shop floor - biting, kicking, and scratching as they rolled through the tripods...

Thank you for coming along to the Little Studio and being such a good photographic model. And thank you to all the people at Fujifilm Australia for letting me have time to try out the new GFX50s camera and lenses in the studio environment. It is my preferred milieu because it has controlled lighting and a coffee pot. And once I let the new medium format camera have its head - doing the thing that it does best - it proved to me how good it can be. The tabletop trial was not the thing - this camera needs more space between itself and the subject. It needs to be photographing fabulous detail in faces. And you need to be careful when you let it go - the detail it captures can be marvellous and terrifying at the same time. Dare I say too detailed for some occasions? If your purpose is to flatter your portrait sitters, and you are addicted to f:16 and smaller apertures, be prepared to be surprised. Also be prepared to have the sitters mad at you. You see,...

Not quite so fast, Biggles. There are still a few things to grasp - the first being the right-hand grip. All kudos to the Fujifilm design team for a perfect hold. There is enough bulk on the front and a very large thumb plate on the back...

Today starts a week of investigation into a camera system that has flashed upon the world for what is a relatively short period of time - the Fujifilm GFX 50S. Those of you who read this column regularly and know that I am a Fujifilm user may have been wondering why it has taken this long to appear. The answer's simple; there have been numerous other reports of the camera and lenses already in the technical, fan-boy, and forum-fighter press. People can get accurate information, biased information, and outright bad manners from other sources - frequently better written than here - and there was no point in just re-transmitting it. I needed to wait until I could investigate the devices myself in my own facilities. The opportunity for this was provided by the Fujifilm people this last week...

Well, if you need to do a heavy job and you need to do a lot of it, you need a bomber. And a ground crew. It need not be a light machine, it need not be dazzlingly fast, and it need not be fashionable-looking. It does not even need to work in pitch-black conditions. But it does need to carry a heavy load, and to do it reliably for a long time. And it does need to be able to hit the target accurately every time. Likewise with the cameras. This is the field of the portrait studio, the product shoot, the fashion coverage. The camera might very well live on a tripod or studio stand for much of the time. It will be working with studio lights, and may be able to hover down about the native ISO of the sensor...

It's no secret that there is a rivalry developing in the medium format digital world these days. The older players have been joined by Fujifilm with their GFX 50S camera and its range of lenses. It stopped the show at last year's Photokina and is doing the same here in the shop. The good news for Perth photographers is that it is available readily - no need to wait until production builds up - and you can make a careful assessment of it by trying out the rental kit we have. It's got a big sensor - 43.8mm x 32.9 mm and it will throw 51.4 megapixels into your SD cards. You will need more memory to operate something like this, and more computer power, time, and storage to deal with the files. The shutters in the camera allow a range of anywhere from 4 seconds to 1/16,000 of a second - you can synch at 1/125th. It would make an awesome studio camera. Not a fast shooter, though - max of 3 fps. You can choose between 100-12,800 ISO in the standard...

Suppose you make one of the best professional cameras in the world - and have done so for the last 69 years. Suppose you decide to head out on a new quest for a professional camera system that breaks your own mould - that gives people increased art capability at a lower price than your other products. Suppose you make it easy to use and extremely stylish. Then suppose that you show it to people and invite them to order the cameras and the new lenses - to pre-order them, as it were. And they do. Here's where the atmosphere grows humid. Suppose they order them in such numbers and your production is held up by business concerns...