Manfrotto Tag

I went through the shop floor just now looking for items to delight and assist you. Little things that i have found helpful in general shooting. Actually I was swanning around avoiding hard work but nevertheless you will like these bits:1. Stroboframe Press T. Best bracket for the pro on the move with a DSLR. Drops your flash shadow behind the subject and avoids red-eye on long shots.2. New Promaster 16 Gb CF card. Check out the free waterproof memory card case you get with it. How cool is that!3. JJC lens hoods. These are bolt-on knock-off copies of Canon, Nikon, and Fuji lenshoods - and there might be other brands possible, for all I know. I use one on the Fuji X-10 and it works fine. Don't be proud!4. Manfrotto little folding feet that bolt to the bottom of your bridge camera and let you take selfies. Really does work!5. Cullman small ball head and small quick-release plate to bolt onto the bottom of a mirrorless system camera. No need to have a QR plate that is larger than...

I was nearly going to get myself into hot water when to came to titling this blog. The words "head" and "video" sat in front of me - in the end sanity prevailed. So read on.We sell a lot of tripods to stills photographers. Particularly the ones who want to remain still - after all that is the general purpose of a tripod...

I think we can all agree with Ms. Jane - see heading image - at some stage of the day. I favour the mid-morning service, myself.But on our sales floor we have many altars - some are sent to us by equipment manufacturers with clever television sets attached to the top and captive video programs that show the wonders of whatever is stacked on the racks below. This is a definite advantage for some customers as it provides the visual stimulus to mental activity...

I came from a province in Canada where the sun only shines two times a year - and one of those times is in the middle of the night so if you get up late you miss it. It was so gloomy the grizzly bears were fitted with fog lights so they could find the campers in the dark.Imagine my pleasure to find Western Australian weather. No more troubles with gloomy skies at weddings. All sunshine and bluebirds. Yeah - all sunshine until 1: The clouds sock in, 2: Those bluebirds are nesting magpies, and 3: The bridal couple want to be fashion stars. Not gas giants or dead dwarf stars either...

My fellow Australians, we have just received photographs and information that have alerted us to the fact that there is more stock on the Camera Electronic shelves than strictly required. This equipment must go. To this end we have considered two courses of action: a naval blockade or a ten-day sale. As most of us get seasick, we will pursue the second choice.To this end, email messages have gone out to the subscribers of Camera Electronic's newsletter informing them of severe price reductions on items noted in the labels of this posting - Canon, Nikon, Manfrotto,Datacolor, Elinchrom, etc.etc. These will continue in force until the end of trading on the 31st of October, 2012.Our terms are not negotiable. Stock must be in-store. Payment in full - cash or card. First come-first served. No online sales of these special items.We will  maintain visual surveillance of the camera sites until the stock is gone. Until that is done, units of  SAC ( the Shop Assistants Command ) will orbit at predetermined stations ready for a sudden swoop upon designated customers. This is...

I used to look at some of the Manfrotto equipment from the 1980's and wonder if they were drinking at lunchtime. It was sturdy, well-built, angular, black, and heavy. Some things really caught your eye, like sharp edges and protruding handles. Some of the ball heads were massive enough to generate their own gravity.Things have changed somewhat - new Manfrotto designs are smooth and stylish and elegant. Still well-built and heavy castings, but nowadays there is a lot of thinking in the design - thinking that has obviously been stimulated by contact with working photographers.Case in point are the new ( to me...

Human nature is a funny thing. You can command people to do things and they will refuse outright. You can plead with them to do things and they will take great pleasure in ignoring you. But provide them with the means to make fools of themselves and they will claw through each other to do it.I found this out when I set up a self-photo rig at a party earlier in the year. It was a simple thing - a camera on a tripod with the on-board flash raised up. A green screen backdrop. A radio-link trigger for the subject to hold and away they went. Later I stripped in a backdrop to replace the green screen and it was a lot of fun. None of my friends issued writs, so they must have been pleased.Last Saturday saw the Mk II photo booth. Gone was the green screen - it tended to intrude too far into the outline of the subject and the computer program associated with it then left very ragged edges. Photoshop and Photoshop Elements did a far...

I learned two things over the weekend shooting - three if you count my continuing experiments in the studio.First thing - People are frightened of flash. No, not just the persons who have been struck by lightning - novice photographers who go out to see stage events and hope to capture the colour and action with their DSLRs. They shoot away, look at the screen, puzzle at the dark images, boost the ISO, and shoot again. When they get the images back home they are still puzzled at the dark shadows but now they have an accompanying pattern of coloured dots in them. At this point some might become discouraged...