macro lens Tag

The next chapter of the Shut-Away Saga involves finances. If yours are dire you might think of skipping the week, but bear with us. There is light and loose change at the end of the tunnel. How much is this going to cost? Well, reading this column costs you nothing - and boy, do you get value for money. But if you are going to look at the digitising business it will cost something. You'll have to look at the cost of scanners, cameras, lenses, and ancillary supplies. or consider Plan C. Ancillaries first - FVE fluid is about $25 a bottle - surgical spirits or IPA about the same, I should say. Swisspers are about $ 5 for a big pack.The slide files are under a dollar apiece if you get a pack of 100. We'll assume you have a laptop or desktop, and some hard drive storage already, so you've already paid out for that. If you opt for Plan A - the scanner - you'll be confronted with a cost of about $ 999 for the Epson V 800. More if...

If you are currently cooped up for any reason short of embezzlement, you may be able to put your time to use digitising your slides and prints. There are lots of ways of doing this - the Epson scanners were mentioned in previous posts. If you have a V-700,800, or 900, settle down seriously and use it. If you don't have one, come see us at Camera Electronic and we'll supply one. But if you don't want to go down the scanning route - Plan A - because of costs or noise or time required, there is a Plan B. It's more trouble to set up but might prove just as do-able for you. And you may own a number of the components for it right now. The Rube Goldberg device you see in these pictures is a simple frame made of scrap MDF board that allows you to accurately position a 35mm transparency in the 2 x 2 mount every time. It suspends a standard mirrorless camera - in this case my travelling Fujifilm X-t10 camera - and a macro lens...

Especially when they are armed with a mirror-less camera and a macro lens. The ability of a close-focusing optic like the Fujinon XF60mm  f 1:2.4 R Macro to show flaws and errors that otherwise slide by the human eye is one of its most disconcerting and endearing qualities. If you are going to be humbled, this the sort of lens that will do it. I found this out when I tried out a new home studio setup here in my old darkroom. There was a bench top free with nearby electric power and enough space on the floor beside it to put up a small Cullmann tripod. I am currently illustrating scale model building for one of my other weblog columns ( note at the bottom if you are interested...

Well I don’t know if Fujifilm X-series enthusiasts will be happy with the results from the Lawrence Liverwurst laboratories or not. For some it will mean that they need to buy a new lens and for some others it will mean that they need NOT buy a new one. To be frank, I LIKE buying new lenses and I recommend the practice to everyone I meet. Nevertheless, science is a hard mistress… Okay. The test with the modelling light on. The green rectangle is where the AF point rests. All three lenses were started up from infinity and fired when they finally found focus. The trials were repeated three times to give each lens a chance to do its best. a. The 18-135mm zoom. This is a general purpose lens that can do many things well, though it necessarily has a limited maximum aperture. When it was triggered it ran in and out for two cycles in one second and then fired. That's the feature image above. b. The 60mm f:2.4 lens is a sort of nearly-macro lens that is designed to do...

Now I get to have my fun - I’ve got a Tamron macro lens and I’m not afraid to use it! I’ve also got a new model car and a fresh pot of coffee. The people who seek macro lenses for their Nikon and Canon bodies are well served by their respective  manufacturers. There is no denying that in each case there is a range of macro lenses and one standout lens that the shooter can purchase to go to for superb results. The standout macro lenses have focal lengths that hover around the 90-105mm mark - and for a good reason. You can get good distortion correction there and a useful stand-off distance from the subject - even when you are cranking the lens to a true 1:1 ratio. The performances and weights of these premium lenses are reflected in the prices, which are also weighty. There has always been another alternative - the Tamron 90mm macro lens. It has in the past had a much lighter mount but an extremely good optical performance. Many people who didn't want to pay the major...