light box Tag

If you are currently cooped up for any reason short of embezzlement, you may be able to put your time to use digitising your slides and prints. There are lots of ways of doing this - the Epson scanners were mentioned in previous posts. If you have a V-700,800, or 900, settle down seriously and use it. If you don't have one, come see us at Camera Electronic and we'll supply one. But if you don't want to go down the scanning route - Plan A - because of costs or noise or time required, there is a Plan B. It's more trouble to set up but might prove just as do-able for you. And you may own a number of the components for it right now. The Rube Goldberg device you see in these pictures is a simple frame made of scrap MDF board that allows you to accurately position a 35mm transparency in the 2 x 2 mount every time. It suspends a standard mirrorless camera - in this case my travelling Fujifilm X-t10 camera - and a macro lens...

There are very few occasions when you see light coming up from under a subject in real life; some discotheques in the 80's had light panel floors, you can see it in the classical footlights at the burlesque theatre, and when you open the hatch of hell there is a sort of a lurid glow that comes up. The effect can be quite unsettling.It is stock in trade for Disney artists and illustrators of fantasy and science fiction when they want to make a subject look evil.But it is also a very valid technique when you are trying to illustrate products for advertisements. In many cases the art director wants the viewer to see all parts of the subject evenly lit for either sales appeal or technical illustration. In some instances this is difficult to achieve with the classic hard/soft light or even with a light tent. No matter where you place the lights, the thing always has a shadow around the bottom bits.Enter the light table. A support for the subject that is sturdy enough to bear the weight,...

At the recent AIPP conference in the Hunter Valley, one of Australia's most famous wildlife photographers - Steve Parish - presented a two-hour talk with a lot of his iconic images. The most glorious underwater pictures you could want.These days the old Carousel projector has long since been replaced with the laptop computer feeding into a video projector. Professional ones seem to be every bit as good as the old slide projectors, and the whole thing can be extremely slick with segues to video clips and music - you can be a real showman with the material.But of course, some of the material may have started out in the film era and has had to be translated to a digital file. Steve's best work is in the digital domain now but he showed us a really disturbing thing - his core base of colour slide material was caught in the Brisbane floods last year and a substantial part of it was ruined. The flood waters that lapped around his storage warehouse came up into the lower drawers of his files...