Leica Tag

If you are a keen amateur photographer you must have a thrill of jealousy when you see the professionals given the task of testing out new photographic equipment. The thought of them driving their vans up to the factory gate and loading new bodies and lenses in with a grain shovel must be maddening. Well, don't get too green-eyed - there are pitfalls to the thing as well. I know - I got to play with a wonderful camera and lenses a couple of months ago and I discovered that it was a nervous experience. To start with, the wholesale representatives are business-like and thorough. They check out everything that takes off and make sure that it lands again. In one piece, too. You sign for each test item. And then you have the problem of keeping that gear pristine while squeezing it through the professional wringer. I left with a box full of camera and lenses that was worth more than the car that bore it away. You have to think about how you can do the thing - about what sort...

I cannot conceal this from you - I adore silver lenses. Whether the finish is chrome, paint, anodised aluminium, or solid sterling silver, I think these optics are absolutely superb. It is prejudice - I acquired a Leica Elmar 2.8 lens with a chrome M2 in 1970 and the experience influenced me ever after. There were some horrible silvers - the collapsible Elmar of the 1950's had a chromed barrel but painted focusing ring and this soon looked sad. There were plain aluminium lenses from East Germany like the Meyer ones from Görlitz that quickly became tawdry. But there were also the Planar and Distagon lenses that fronted the 500-series Hasselblads and they looked magnificent. In my own chosen brand they are also supplying some of their small primes in a chrome finish - 23mm, 35mm, and 50mm so far. I have even seen on-line examples of the Fujifilm 27mm f:2.8 in silver, though whenever it is listed it is sold out. I'll bet it was an exclusively Japanese product. Leica have never given up on the aesthetics of the silver lens. You...

I realise that "triad" is a word with different evocations in different societies. In this blog post I am linking it more to military policy than to secret societies. Not that military organisations aren't secret - but what they do can be deliberately made very public. The triad that the US employs for strategic defence depends upon three things - the USAF bombers, the ICBM's, and the US Navy's submarine-launched missiles. Heaven forbid that they will ever be used, but the fact that there are three delivery agencies means that enemies know that they cannot get away with it. Unfortunately the policy means that three times as much money and effort must be spent in research, development, acquisition, training, deployment, maintenance, etc. Three times as much national effort. No-one does this sort of thing successfully unless they are major organisations. Leica is one of those organisations. Not in defence, but in photographic optics. They operate a triad system as well: a. The M-mount for cameras. Pioneered in the 1950's this must be one of the most recognised pieces of camera engineering there is...

No, not that Party. The Leica party. The launch night for the newest member of the Leica family here in Perth. The Flour Factory restaurant and bistro was the venue - it is a good display choice as it has such a large and open second floor. The ceiling takes a bit of getting used to, but that is the way of modern design when it uses older structures. At least the Flour Factory does not have burnt wooden beams and abandoned fireplaces jutting from the walls like some venues - the designers here had some restraint. I need to clear something up at the start. It has been bruited about that the only reason I go to these launch parties is for the beer. This is cruelly inaccurate - there is also the sausage and cheese...

I do love a good boxing match - and look at how well the boxes that house the new Fujifilm X-T2 and X-T20 match! They have been smart enough to put them in a similar outer pack ( with the contents clearly marked so that the sales staff can find them in the dim recesses of the store-room , thank goodness, are you taking notice, Wetzlar? ) for brand unity, but imaginative enough to box the more expensive one in the black and the less expensive one in the white. Both packs are pierced to show the X logo of the marque.   Both packs feature an internal tray for the body and a separate case for all the accessories. They are easy to unpack and easy to pack up again...

We primed you with a post last Friday mentioning 15% off the price of Zeiss lenses at our Murray Street store but we cleverly did not tell you the actual prices - leaving you to search out the figures on our Camera Electronic store website or turn up at Murray Street and ask the staff. Either way will eventually show you that the 15% is a substantial saving...

If you are going to be a professional press photographer covering the political and business scene you are going to have to have the ability to think on your feet, and think fast. You'll also have to have an eye for a situation as it develops - the rich and powerful rarely pause in their tracks to suit you - or if they do it is for extremely brief periods of time. The quick shot gets the page. This much was evident in the talk given at Shoot Photography last night by Attila Csaszar - a staff photographer for Business News in Western Australia. That's him posing with a copy of the magazine bannered with a portrait he took of the WA Premier. Not a surprise, that, for a business paper, but big news for the Leica enthusiasts at Shoot - because it was taken with a wide-angle lens on a Leica Q camera. The Leica Q is all wide angle and all Leica. You can't remove the lens but you can dial in three focal length outputs from it - with...