Large Format Tag

Because it's mine. It  wasn't yesterday morning when I went into the Stirling Street shop to take illustration images for the weblog. I propped up my portable product set on an unused counter top and went round gathering whatever was new. I noted that the Sony shelves were being stocked with fresh lenses and bodies - and it is darned nice to see the new display cabinetry moving toward completion in the front of the shop. Dangerous, though. The sight of new equipment, well-displayed, penetrates deep into the soul of a lot of us. There are jokes about Gear Acquisition Syndrome and how much photographers like to buy things - and there is more than a grain of truth in the humour. You must know the truth - that same desire is often in the management and staff. We love all aspects of photography; images, art, knowledge, personalities...

We are told that light goes at 299,792,458 metres per second. That may be so when there is company present but I can assure you that when you are using a pinhole camera the stuff travels considerably slower. While you might get your ordinary photography with a digital camera done in half an hour the pinhole camera will require most of the day. The reason for this is simple: the digital camera opens up to a maximum aperture of f:1.8 and uses an ISO of 6400 - the pinhole camera opens up to f: 248 and uses an ISO of 100. If you opt for the paper negative you have an ISO of 0.6 and if you put a yellow filter in front of the thing you have an ISO of peanut butter. As far as making pictures, choose smooth or crunchy...

You could be forgiven for missing the place at twilight - we were in search of Fridays Studio for the launch of the Hasselblad H6D camera…the ironic thing was it was on a Monday.No matter, the Fridays Studio is the newest venture of Ian and Erick Regnard, the two brothers famed for their underwater work with large format cameras. I think that the fact that they used large format cameras is diagnostic - there was a definite sees of space and magnitude about the studio.It is a work in progress - at present there is one wall completed of what ultimately will be a three-dimensional infinity cyclorama. The fact that the building that houses the studio was an industrial warehouse and garage before means that there is a very large open interior with a very high ceiling. They have taken full advantage of this to make an infinity scoop that can accomodate a great deal of vertical activity - the tallest samba headdress will still not break the background. Impressive!The studio also uses a central divider to create a natural...

And no holes in it, either!The Arca Swiss company is famous for letting it all hang out - in this case in about 4 directions at the same time*. Studio photographers will immediately recognise the way this Arca Swiss C1 cube has been set up - the fore and aft Sheimpflug modulated tilt/shift toggle beam position. As used to render advertising images for sock manufacturers...

Don't get steamed if we derail your train of thought. Make a bridge - or a trestle - and get over it. This is no time to be a sleeper. Switch to large format.Aren't you sorry you started reading this?Okay, enough of the train jokes. We are in a bind down here. We have had what appears to be a large amount of fresh large format film arrive and the fridge is getting crowded out.Ilford HP5 - 400 ISO. Great 4 x 5 film and we've gotta lotta it.Come down now for a bargain on this  - it is totally fresh.Make tracks for the shop...

FotoFreo this year has a special workshop in planning - Alexander Bond and Peter Kovacsy will present a hands-on and eyes-open workshop dealing with using large format cameras in the field. In these days of small digital everything, Alex has pursued a different route - large chemical work - and has garnered awards and sold myriads of postcards and books upon the strength of it.He'll be presenting the workshop at Point Walter Reserve, Bicton, on Saturday afternoon, the 24th of March. The start time is 1:00 and it will run until 4:30...