Large Format Tag

Every so often I find a cache of goods in our storeroom that do not sit on the racks downstairs - there is only so much space inside a concrete building and you have to leave room for the staff to sidle sideways. But the fact that the items are not on general show doesn't mean that they should not be seen - someone may benefit greatly from them. The winner with today's find is the studio worker who will be using a really heavy camera and lens setup that needs to be both rock solid and reasonably compact. The Cullmann Titan TB 8.2 is all that and incorporates a unique feature to secure the camera. We've all gone to some trouble to make sure our cameras are secure on the tripods we choose - many people attaching quick-release plates or brackets to the bottom of digital cameras. These work fine, if the tripod head has a correspondingly sturdy shoe and grip to hold the thing. But many large format and oddly-shaped cameras don't sit well on quick release plates. They still...

Photographers who may find themselves confined to their home for some time due to various reasons - illness, financial straits, or a court order, for instance - can still have a lot of fun and learn many new facts by resorting to their computer and the resources of the internet. We'll leave aside the visual temptations of Icker, Monstagram, or any of the other purely presentational sites and direct you to technical ones. I mean, beautiful images are all very well for the professionals, but when you come right down to it, the amateur photographer wants specifications and technical comparisons, eh? So today's site is Dofmaster. Go to dofmaster.com and look at the variety of products you can get for your information devices. They do a number of electronic programs for the different forms of mobile phone or tablet and for the fixed computers. You can pop right into the depth of field calculator and experiment with the idea before you commit to anything. I use the free bit all the time to compare and contrast different lenses. The idea is you...

We are told that light goes at 299,792,458 metres per second. That may be so when there is company present but I can assure you that when you are using a pinhole camera the stuff travels considerably slower. While you might get your ordinary photography with a digital camera done in half an hour the pinhole camera will require most of the day. The reason for this is simple: the digital camera opens up to a maximum aperture of f:1.8 and uses an ISO of 6400 - the pinhole camera opens up to f: 248 and uses an ISO of 100. If you opt for the paper negative you have an ISO of 0.6 and if you put a yellow filter in front of the thing you have an ISO of peanut butter. As far as making pictures, choose smooth or crunchy...

You could be forgiven for missing the place at twilight - we were in search of Fridays Studio for the launch of the Hasselblad H6D camera…the ironic thing was it was on a Monday.No matter, the Fridays Studio is the newest venture of Ian and Erick Regnard, the two brothers famed for their underwater work with large format cameras. I think that the fact that they used large format cameras is diagnostic - there was a definite sees of space and magnitude about the studio.It is a work in progress - at present there is one wall completed of what ultimately will be a three-dimensional infinity cyclorama. The fact that the building that houses the studio was an industrial warehouse and garage before means that there is a very large open interior with a very high ceiling. They have taken full advantage of this to make an infinity scoop that can accomodate a great deal of vertical activity - the tallest samba headdress will still not break the background. Impressive!The studio also uses a central divider to create a natural...

And no holes in it, either!The Arca Swiss company is famous for letting it all hang out - in this case in about 4 directions at the same time*. Studio photographers will immediately recognise the way this Arca Swiss C1 cube has been set up - the fore and aft Sheimpflug modulated tilt/shift toggle beam position. As used to render advertising images for sock manufacturers...

Don't get steamed if we derail your train of thought. Make a bridge - or a trestle - and get over it. This is no time to be a sleeper. Switch to large format.Aren't you sorry you started reading this?Okay, enough of the train jokes. We are in a bind down here. We have had what appears to be a large amount of fresh large format film arrive and the fridge is getting crowded out.Ilford HP5 - 400 ISO. Great 4 x 5 film and we've gotta lotta it.Come down now for a bargain on this  - it is totally fresh.Make tracks for the shop...

FotoFreo this year has a special workshop in planning - Alexander Bond and Peter Kovacsy will present a hands-on and eyes-open workshop dealing with using large format cameras in the field. In these days of small digital everything, Alex has pursued a different route - large chemical work - and has garnered awards and sold myriads of postcards and books upon the strength of it.He'll be presenting the workshop at Point Walter Reserve, Bicton, on Saturday afternoon, the 24th of March. The start time is 1:00 and it will run until 4:30...