L bracket Tag

I always wished I had an Auntie Zelda. She sounds like the sort of lady who would either make cinnamon rolls or get roaring drunk before noon. Both attractive prospects. How delightful, then, to see a Zelda in the Stirling Street accessory rack. In this case our old friends Three Legged Thing have added another L-bracket to their current line. And the name is quite significant. Put aside thoughts of the cinnamon rolls or F. Scott Fitgerald's wife - this Zelda is so named because she is a direct match for the new Nikon mirror-less Z cameras - the Nikon Z6 and Z7. As these are specific models, the bracket is especially cast for them. It is not one of the universal types that has internal rails to let it expand or contract. This is one size for the Nikon Z cameras. This specificity allows a very clever feature to be cast into the basic device - look at the post in the baseplate just behind the tripod screw. That fits into a special socket on the baseplate of the Nikon Z cameras...

I always love to see Three Legged Thing products - they are colourful in a world that is becoming just black, silver, and grey. Like little sports cars on the road in bright paint jobs - they make photography fun. These Three Legged Thing QRII LC brackets make it more steady too - they are anodized aluminium L-brackets that will fit many DSLR and mirror-less cameras. I found orange and blue and there may be green available as well. The bracket is essentially Arca-Swiss size but has been made universal for most cameras. The side piece can be unbolted from the baseplate if you only want a bottom rail - though I often use  the side rail on my bracket in the studio when a portrait-mode picture is needed. There are several threaded sockets in strategic places and very sturdy strap attachment points at the top and side. I use a wide woven cotton strap on mine. Note as well, the rubber non-slip grip at the bottom of the baseplate that should protect the finish on your camera. The included carabiner is possibly intended to...

Ever since I started to do studio photography I gained new respect for the chaps who put up scaffolding and hoardings on building sites. You see their structures all the time but you don't stop to think of how complex they are until you start to try to bolt together a set of camera or light supports. More often than not in the Little Studio the parts used are made by Manfrotto. This blithely named product - the MS050M4-Q2 - is just such a component - but rather than holding lights or backdrop rolls, it's a camera support...