Kodak Tag

We had 'em then but we don't have 'em now - not unless we make 'em specially. Every camera my family owned, from Grandpa Sheedy's Kodak 3A to my Mom's Brownie 620 and the family Magazine 8 Kodak had a hand strap permanently attached to the top of it. There were no lugs at the side of the cameras and no thought of a neck strap. That was reserved for the leather cases that held the cameras and accessories. It was old-fashoned, but useful. Cameras in those days ( after dinosaurs but prior to Elvis ) were special-event things. They got hauled out of the case for the family or travel record and then put back carefully. Nothing dangled around the neck - it was all hand-held. And oddly enough the cameras were lighter than the current crop of mirror-less and DSLRs that are dangling around our necks. Our increasingly sore necks...

How you do anything has a great deal to do with the supplies you have available. Analog photography is no exception - and these days unfortunately the machinery and raw materials are getting scarcer. At this point I'd like to point out that at one time there was no such thing as analog photography - prior to 1826. Between that and 1975 there was only photography. Subsequently there has been digital as well. Which gives you pause...

The heading image is a box of film. To be more specific, it is a box containing a plastic canister with a pop-off lid. Inside the canister is a metal cartridge with a plastic spool in the centre. Around the plastic spool is wound a perforated roll of plastic film, 35mm wide. it's about a yard long give or take a few inches. On one side of the plastic strip is a tough emulsion with a number of layers of light-sensitive  material - three colours that react differently to light that falls upon them - however briefly. The cartridge is shaped to go inside a " 35mm " film camera. his might be made by Leica, Canon, Nikokn, Zeiss Ikon, Kodak, Mercury, Argus, or any number of makers. strip of plastic film inside the cartridge is engaged by a set of sprockets and rollers in the camera and drawn past an aperture 24mm x 36mm in the dark. At the appropriate time, a shutter exposes this aperture to light with an upside-down image focused upon it. If you are very good and...

The early days of aviation, automobiles, and railways all had several things in common; the look of the first airplanes, cars, and steam engines was unusual. Unusual in that the devices had not been seen before, and unusual in that they do not resemble anything that we see now. They were cutting-edge technologies for their times and claimed the right to be that new sight in the land. No-one knew what the standard shape should be - as a result, there were some odd-bods...

The Fujifilm Classic Chrome setting for their X-T1, X-T10, X-1oot and X-E2 cameras is something inside them that makes jpeg images look like a slide film that was first developed in upstate New York in the 1930's and later modified to have more colour fidelity and higher ASA. The resemblance is uncanny - I cannot help but think that the electronics wizards at Fujifilm may have done it deliberately...

Some of our new clients are students and come to us with sheets of instructions from their schools - list of things to buy for their course. This is undoubtedly helpful to them as long as the writers of the lists are up-to-date in the trade and not given to impish humour. I would be quite the wrong person to write these as I would be sending the poor little students out looking for wooden plate cameras and Polachrome 35mm film...