Hasselblad Tag

A paper has just been read to the Royal Society expounding a new mathematical discovery in the field of optics. Formerly the question of the photographic tripod has been the subject of rumour and folk legend - we now have a proper formula to explain it.Sir Isaac Newton is popularly portrayed as forming his theory of the force of gravity by getting hit on the head by and apple - this is nonsense of course, but in the case of the tripod number this was indeed occasioned by a fall. Someone's 5D MkIII and 600mm lens tilted over and hit the mud when the owner attached it to a $ 49 plastic tripod and then let go...

Dear Camera Designers,Thank you for the new features on my camera. I appreciate the Automatic setting, the Intelligent Automatic setting, and the Disturbingly Prescient setting. Last night my camera got out of its bag, went down the street, and took a picture of the showers at the Nurse's Quarters all by itself. Tonight I am deadlocking the door.Thank you also for the smile recognition feature, though I must admit that mine seems to have died - I turned it on at it to the last family picnic and the camera refused to fire.The little pictogram in the special settings menu is my favourite - the one that has the cocktail glass. I look at it fondly every afternoon about 5:00. I feel you have come to understand me.Now that we have these ideas realised, I would like to suggest a further improvement in your design - the provision of a small and effective wireless flash trigger in the accessory battery grips of your DSLR and mirrorless cameras.Already one manufacturer has pursued this in red-and-white terms for one model of their...

Those of you who have used, or do use, a 500-series Hasselblad, or a Rolleiflex, or a dear old Bronica S2* will be perfectly familiar with the folding viewfinder hood. You have been unfolding it regularly for years to let you see the viewfinder screen while out in the sunlight. It keeps the glare off the screen as you peer downwards.You are people of surprising facility - your minds have long since mastered the art of seeing things reversed in the horizontal mode and then tracking your subject. You can probably write your name backward in a mirror at parties. But you are in dead trouble when you try to see the screen of your new digital camera in that same sunlight.The screen whites out - and the manufacturers have not thought to include the dear old waist-level folding hood to help. Too old-school? Grrrrrrr...

There is a time an a place for everything - and stealthy silent behaviour is frequently required in torpedo attacks, street photography, and federal caucus meetings. It never does to alert the potential victims.To this end the Fujifilm company and a number of other manufacturers have included quiet modes in their cameras. Some are more effective than others; in some cases the reduction in sound is not very much - in others it is complete.As far as silent cameras go I do remember an Olympus EE film camera of the 1960's that had a leaf shutter actuated in some way by electric circuitry. Even with the acute hearing of youth - pre air drills or military rifles - I could not hear it as it was operated.With the Hasselblad 500-series you had a pre-release of the mirror that allowed you to get that noise over with before firing the shutter - and if you kept your finger on the shutter button afterwards there was no more sound until you were away from the scene.The Nikon company have Q modes in...

Gone. Gone forever. It has rolled off the roof, where you were taking pictures of the nurse's quarters, and fallen into a newly-opened bottomless pit that has appeared in your back yard.What are you going to do?This depends upon whether you had the foresight to purchase a Mack Diamond Warranty when you got the lens. If that was under three years ago you can breathe a sigh of relief.Ring up the Mack people, tell them the sad news, and wait for them to send you a cheque for the replacement cost of another Very Favourite Lens. They are men of honour - if you have a Diamond Warranty you are covered for three years against impact damage, manufacturer defects, sand/grit damage, accidental or unintentional abuse, mechanical malfunction, and abnormal wear and tear.You are still required to keep your gear secure against human thieves - they cannot really insure you against patently criminal activity. For that matter, neither can some police forces...