full frame Tag

It's always thrilling to be given a big chunk - whether it's chocolate, motor car, or money. I would be out of my depth with all three, but I figure I could cope better with a camera - thus I was delighted to handed the new Panasonic S1R camera with a 50mm lens when I visited the Murray Street Store.  To say I was impressed would be an understatement. Panasonic cameras always intrigue me - I had one briefly a few years ago - and any new evocation of their top range is worth looking into. But in the case of the S1R I'm afraid the looking into becomes looking at. It is somewhat beyond my league in price and bulk. Not that it is the biggest or most expensive of cameras - there are still larger and dearer ones on the market - but it is getting up past what Panasonic used to aim at. I suppose that is the way of the trade - though it is interesting to see some makers downsize their designs while other boost theirs. And...

I frequently pass by the Sigma racks in the storeroom but foolishly never stop to pluck something from the shelves. My fault, because I am missing some of the most intriguing lenses in the place. The shooters who use Canon or Nikon camera bodies get a better chance than I to test things out. And someone with a Nikon Full-frame DSLR will be the one to take an interest in today's lens. The dear old 105mm lens has been the mainstay of the portraitist for a long time - when mounted on a 24 x 36 camera it is perfect for head and shoulders and upper torso shots - such a good combination of focal length and depth of field that these lenses are frequently ground with a wide maximum aperture. f:2.8 is common and then it'll run up to f:1.4 in the premium ones. f:1.4 for this length is a sizeable chunk of melted sand and demands the best design for the resolution and freedom from distortion, It looks as though it also demands the best possible barrel mounting - this is...

This week I finally come to grips with the new Canon EOS R camera system - or at least with one example of it. Enough stock has arrived to allow me to take one back to the Little Studio and give it my own workout. The camera is packed well. Don't laugh at me for praising the box - there have been other things in other boxes in the past that have caused serious grief. This one sets out the goods in three trays on three levels and adds additional packing for the most delicate parts. The most interesting bits are often the smallest. Note the computer harness block. The Canon EOS R will be capable of tethering to computers - and note that Camera Electronic has a full range of Tether Tools cables to assist with this. It is a measure of the determination that Canon is showing to make their new mirror-less system a fully professional one. It's a sleek and handsome camera, reminiscent of the shape of the DSLR but without the depth of the mirror box. The...

Now that you have returned to consciousness, or back from the pub, you can begin to look at the coming year with a bit more equanimity. I want you to cast your mind back to the bald, skinny Frenchman we mentioned before; Henri Cartier-Bresson. Remember that name, and go to the bookstore or the library and hunt out a volume of his pictures. You may also find essays in some books that he has written. They are fine, in a way, but do not have the impact of his pictures - these are truly universal in their communication, and point you toward some part of your choice. HCB - as opposed to JCB - used standard lenses. Lenses that were prime ( As he was shooting in the 40's and 50s you can presume pre-zoom...

What do you do if you have to cope with targets both on the ground and in the air? Leaving aside the suggestion of a Flak 88 and a set of ear plugs, we come to the answer of the fighter-bomber. An aircraft fast and agile enough to deal with a dogfight ( assuming that the pilot is incautious enough to get into one ) and big enough and heavy enough to haul bombs and drop them. On the enemy, and preferably a considerable distance from home. The aircraft has to be rugged, as the business of both aerial combat and ground pounding puts a heavy strain on the airframe. The engine has to be big enough to cope with this weight. The armament...

The advent of the first of the Sony new cameras a few years ago - the Alpha series - was quite a revelation for the shop. Sony Australia put on a comprehensive demonstration of the performance of their biggest DSLR here at a Perth studio and the CE staff trooped along to try it out. It was more glamour than I could ever imagine. And I have always hoped that they would do it again when they were ready to release their new full frame Alpha 9 mirror-less camera. The new camera is in the shop right now, and it represents the best of a developing technology for Sony. Mirror-less with full 24 x 36 frame is about as good a compromise of size and performance as anyone makes - pair it with Sony and Zeiss optics and you really can desire very little more. Here is a list of the attributes of the new camera: 24 x 36 full frame 24.2 megapixel CMOS sensor. Electronic/mechanical shutter - no vibration or noise. Up to 1/32000 second speed. 20 fps possible. 693 AF points...