Fujifilm Tag

No, I am not advocating a return to the simple life of our peasant ancestors; I've seen what cows can do in a paddock. I am asking you to give up the complexities of internet webs and transfer of files and take up simple prints. Not with the giant printer, the calibrated monitor, and the hand-laid archival paper. Just a little print in your hand that you can look at without a battery or a Wifi hot point. An Instax print. If you've got a Fujifilm Instax camera and a packet of film you can go out and make 10 of 'em yourself right now, and with the simple operation of the camera means that they'll all look pretty good. But what if you already have some pretty good images trapped in your mobile phone or your Fujifilm camera right now - and you want to share them? You break out the Instax Share SP-3 printer. And you start to make square instant prints.   I won't mention another brand name that also used to make square prints, but the nostalgic amongst you will...

It takes no more time to physically walk round a medium format camera than it does a smaller 24 x 36 or APS-DC one, but the mechanical designers of many different brands would have you pause, puzzle, and backtrack to try to figure out exactly what they want you to do so that you can make their camera do what you want to do. The wise ones - and I'll whisper the names Canon, Nikon, and Fujifilm - make their new instructions very much like their old ones. And if they resist the temptation to go down the hall to the graphic design office and demand a new set of icons for the screen, they have the blessings of all working shooters. As an aside - on the subject of shooting - anyone who has ever shot a repeating rifle and worked the mechanism to get a cartridge into the receiver will know that generally they have to pull something up or back somehow. It varies with different arms but you can puzzle it out pretty smartly. Try that with a Swedish...

I formed a very good opinion of the Fujifilm GFX 50S camera when I tried it out in my studio a year or so ago. The test shots done with a pin-up model in the style of a magazine cover pointed out the extreme detail available with the medium format sensor. The richness of the colour that the CMOS sensor produced told me that this would be s perfect studio camera - if the subject matter required a degree of enlargement and the price of the job would justify the extra outlay that medium format requires. I regretted that I didn't have that sort of business to justify owning the camera. I have now had a very brief chance to play with the alternate version of this camera - the Fujifilm GFX 50R - in an almost-studio situation. And as it was the sort of studio I dabble in, there was some point in me comparing that last experience to this one. The new Fujifilm has much the same sensor as its stablemate, but takes a different form - this one is...

That's me. Might as well be candid about it. I will spend money when I need to but I put a great deal of effort into finding it unnecessary. Sometimes that means a great deal of expense but I'm happy to say that's not the case today. Today cheap succeeds. The task in hand was getting a closer focus on the model aircraft - and upon shop stock - while using the Fujifilm 18 -55mm f:2.8-4 R OIS lens. Here's an example of the closest focus achievable - 55mm and f:22. Good - sharp and well-exposed - but just a little far away for many studio purposes. The lens itself is an unrecognised hero for regular photography. So much so, that I am using it in the experiment of mounting it and not changing it for a year - an effort to avoid the dust menace on the sensor. But back to the day's shooting. I located one of the simplest and cheapest solutions to this - the plain old supplemental lens. The accessory we all clapped onto our film cameras in the old days....

Have I got this right? Can I fit any lens to the Fujifilm X-H1 and whirl it around on the end of the strap and still get pin-sharp pictures of the moon? Is that how the system works? Well, I shall find out, though I cannot wait until the next full moon - I'm going to experiment with the thing in broad daylight. The idea of a stabilisation system in a lens is no new thing - that's been on DSLR lenses as well as the mirror-less lenses for some years now. And it works - lots of times marginal shots have been saved by the lens being steadier than the photographer. And some makers have gone step further - putting stabilisation systems unto the bodies of their cameras so that any lens attached gets the benefit of the increased steadiness. Some have systems that combine the efforts of both lens and body to increase the effect. All these are to be applauded - particularly if you need to take steady pictures while you are clapping. The Fujifilm system up until the X-H1...

I am puzzled at the position in the Fujifilm family that might be occupied by the Fujiflm X-H1 camera. Is it a little brother, a middle brother, or a big brother? Is it a cousin? The basics of the camera have been known since its introduction; a well-built metal body, slightly bigger than the X-T1 or 2 with a heftier hand grip. Many of the features of the X-T2 plus a few extras...

Here's a little product that was lurking on the sales floor this morning in CE - the Kii Pix  instant printer. It is the sort of device that is somewhat practical ad totally fun. And it will sit and fit with a lot more people than you'd imagine. The mobile phone - or smart phone, if you come from a part of the world where phones are more intelligent than their owners  - contains a lot more of the imagery of the world than the average camera. It certainly contains more of the personal history - once the call records are subpoenaed...

I reported on the Fujifilm X-100F some time ago - comparing and contrasting the black version of this camera with the black X-100 that I owned at that time. They were separated by a number of generations of development but closely tied in form and function - go look in the archives of this column if you'd like to read the original articles. The last report on this one was on the 22nd of June and was pretty comprehensive in explaining the retro nature of the model. I'm afraid I got canned on our Facebook page for this post by a reader who thought I hadn't pointed out the right features. I daresay he is leaping for the keyboard right now, but what the heck - the camera is a bit of a gem. This week I was curious to see what might be made of the images taken at closer distances...

Do you get up before dawn and drive around the suburbs looking for houses? Do you carry an entire studio in the back of your Hyundai TinyBoy? Do you deal with surly customers at 3:30 in the morning? Are you an unpaid maid who cleans up an entire house in a half hour? Do you take pictures that are demanded faster than Jesse James can say " Stick 'em up "? And do they have to be perfect - or you go to redo the entire sequence at your own expense? At dusk, this time...