Fujifilm Tag

The advent of the LCD screen on the back of the digital camera was the real dawn of the age of electronic photography. The sensor, the processor, and all the other ancillary bits were also necessary, but it really did not gel in our minds until we could see that little coloured screen. Once we saw what we had just shot, we were hooked. The hook set even deeper when we could see what it was going to be...

We pause a little in the week to consider a new camera from Fujifilm. Warwick Williams presented the Fujifilm X-Pro3 camera to us last night at the Murray Street store and it was a bit of a surprise. Not a complete one, mind - that's never possible these days when there are rumour sites abounding and DP Review seems to command first look at anything. But first look on the internet is nothing like first look in actual life when you can handle the actual product and listen to an acknowledged factory expert. It ain't real until you can pick it up. Well I picked up the X- Pro3 body and gave it a chance to focus and shoot - and I was impressed. I say this as the owner of 5 more Fujifilm bodies; one of which is the X-Pro1. The two generation gap between mine and the new one has been time and development well spent. You'll all have seen the controversy surrounding the flip-down screen and the little film tag window at the back. The film tag window did nothing...

I wouldn't like this to get out to the fans of other camera makers but we need to talk. There are new cameras in the offing and we don't yet know what they are going to be like. We need to be prepared. I say " we " because I am one of " us " . I used to be one of " them " but " they " complained and I had to run for it. In any case I currently have 5 Fujifilm cameras sharing 7 lenses and can claim at least a passing acquaintance with the brand. And that means I know what they do when no-one is looking. They use up their batteries. It was sort of sad with the Fujifilm X-10  - those slim little batteries the size of halloween chocolate bars. You could do wonders with the camera but you needed 3 charged batteries every time you left the house. Then the X-100 and a slightly larger battery...

We often show the instant cameras that are popular with analog photographers - Impossible Project ones or Leica ones or Fujifilm ones - we've even had Lomo instant cameras. But we rarely feature the most important part of their makeup - the film packs. The question of film for Polaroid Cmaeras - either original or revamped - is a more complex one than that for the Fujifilm Instax systems. So let's look at what was on the rack at Stirling Street. Eight Squares in colour for $ 30 but beware that it fits the new cameras: And here's the monochrome version for the same price. Should you have a Polaroid Pop camera with the inkless thermal technology you shoot more pictures for less money. But going away from the Polaroid-centric supplies, here are the various choices for the Fujifilm Instax System. Not all cameras are represented here but be assured that the Leica film is, indeed, Instax. The joy of Instax for Fujifilm is that it sells by the trainload. It is one of the major earners for their photo division in Japan and I'll bet...

You might be forgiven for thinking that wireless triggers are simple things. So they are, when all you wish to do is tell a circuit to close at a distance from the camera. You put a transmitter on the hot shoe of the camera, a receiver under the speedlight out in the distance, and fire away. As long as the things are plugged in correctly and the AA batteries are fresh, it works every time. When you start to go TTL, however, and start to introduce different models of different maker's flashes, the whole thing becomes as complex as a spider's web. Here's a collage of images from the different trigger systems here in the shop on just one day. Beware that not all triggers made are shown - you have miles to go in this forest before you can sleep...

Disregard the fact that we are selling it. If we had any sense we would keep it ourselves. Buy this Fujifilm Instax Mini 9. Take it home and put it on a trophy shelf - because no matter if you are the operator of a gecko farm or a cucumber ranch, you are never going to have anything in your life as green and cool as this camera. And something of that cool style is bound to rub off on you. This is actually a thing. And not just with Fujifilm. Remember the Leica Urban Jungle mirrorless camera of a few weeks ago - that's another milestone of cool. You'll pay more for it and it won't take instant pictures, but consider buying that one too. And while you're at it turn over in your own mind some of the milestones ( kilometre stones? ) of the photographic design world in the past few decades. There may still be time to go out and find one for your own Museum Of Modern Art ( ifacts...

We've been showing the Fujifilm Instax cameras for some time now - the ones with the coloured bodies, textured cases, slippy shapes, etc.  They are prime candidates for styling and promotion - both because of the moulded design of the camera bodies, and the nature of their prime market; the younger Japanese social shooters. They are attuned to colour, shape, cartoons, entertainment, and fashion. They value fun things. They're not afraid to show it - they tote the cameras in bags decorated with animé characters with glee. So where does the camera in the heading image fit into the Instax scene? A large central circle on a copper-coloured square bezel. With a dot on one corner. Now where have you seen that one before...