Fujifilm Tag

Not every car starts first time, every time - nor does it always travel smoothly on every road. The same with cameras - even the newest of the new. Oh, I'm not suggesting that the new Fujifilm X-T100 did not turn on - it popped to life as soon as I put in a W-126 battery and a small SD card. It even let me bypass the date, time, and place to get to the regular operation fairly quickly. You can probably get into the copyright and EXIF minutae somewhere in the back of the menu cupboard but that is not what you want when you are doing a review. In, bang, and out, please. Had I just taken it for a spin in the garden or out at the park under natural light I would have had no trouble - the Auto ISO and Auto WB would have rendered everything perfectly and I could have snapped to my heart's content. There's a continual - focus setting in the SR+ that seems to anticipate what I am looking at when I glance...

Yes. Yes, this is the new Fujifilm camera; X-T100. Gotta look intently at Fujifilm packs because they are all so very alike. And the people in the company who name the new products often get the letters and numbers frighteningly close to the old designations. It pays to peer closely. If I'd been more casual about it I might have mistaken this for the X-100 or the T-T10. The internet is no help - a Google search often turns up a mixture of old and new posts that can send you out past where the buses run in short order. Well, with the box at home, the package opened like most other Fujifilm gear - well packed without being buried in frustration and sharp edges. I assembled the lens and camera and dropped in a charged W 126 battery and away we went. The beauty of Fujifilm now is the standardisation of the battery requirements - no more hauling three chargers in the suitcase for three different levels of performance. The body is sleek - in this case the graphite shade that hovers between...

A recent post regarding the Fujifilm X-100F camera drew critical response from a reader - as much for my style of writing, I suspect, as for the content of the column. Well, to paraphrase President Lincoln, you can please some of the people all the time and all of the people some of the time, but...

I'm not one for watching murder mysteries on television - I like mine in book form written by Mike Hammer or Agatha Christie. I'll occasionally delve into the Sherlock Holmes era as well, but wherever the story is set, I have one common experience - I fail to see the clues. Of course, that's what I'm supposed to do to keep the suspense up until the end, and I play along and am amazed on cue in the end. Any novel that has lost the last three pages is a well of frustration. Well...

If you've been tempted to buy one of the Fujifilm X-100 series cameras over the last few years - the X-100, the X-100S, the T-100T, or the current X-100F, you may have thought that you were going to get the full digital experience. Well, I gotta tell you that they have left a few things out of the cameras. Here's what you'll be missing out on: a. Sticky rubber coverings that swell up and detach from the body casting. I was never able to destroy the covering of the original X-100 in five years of ownership and I don't think I could budge the current stuff  either. If you want to make it look scuffy and grungy you'll have to use a wood chisel. b. Stylish internet app bluetooth brainwave controls. Fujifilm decided to let it all hang out - you change the ISO, shutter speed, and aperture with old-fashioned turning dials with click stops. You press a shutter button that looks like a shutter button. It is under your finger, rather than hiding coyly. It's like they just don't want to...

I was delighted with the Tamron Tap-in Console when I opened the box in the studio. I don't own a DSLR or a Tamron SP lens, but  the look of this accessory is reward enough - it's like having an electronic hockey puck with a USB interface, eh? For the people who use the higher end Nikon or Canon DSLR bodies and want to pair them with compatible Tamron lenses, this "hockey puck" acts as an interface to do a number of things: Put in firmware updates that may be issued by Tamron. Put in correction factors for individual lenses in regard to auto focusing at three separate distances. You have to determine the best correction numbers by separate test but once achieved you can lock them in via Tamron website commands. Put in auto-focus limiting modifications if you want to change the range of this. Decide whether you'll need MF and optimise the focus ring operation. Optimise how the stabilisation system of the lens acts according to your own needs. These are valuable things to control - but you'll have to...

I am not sure if this column will sell you anything  - I'm not even sure if it will sell you on anything. But If I can make silly decisions, so can you, and sometimes they are the smartest part of the whole day. Take the business of breaking the habits of a lifetime and going against all that you have been taught? Well, if you can do this without travelling the wrong way up the Freeway at peak hour, you might just do your photography a service. I think I have done so by going strapless. Like all photographers of the 1960's I diligently threaded the leatherette straps supplied in the boxes onto the SLR and compact cameras of the period. I wore them around my neck  or over my shoulder until I had banged the lenses into enough walls to dent the filter rings. Then I kept them in camera bags and fumbled for them until I dropped them on the pavement. Then I just dropped them into Pelican cases...