Fujifilm Tag

If you ever want to know whether something is legit in an overall sense, you should look at the things about it that you know personally - and judge the remainder accordingly. Not saying that this is strictly scientific, but you stand a better chance of getting to the bottom of something if you work with tools you know. Case in point - have you ever seen something happen that was considered news-worthy, watched the news-gathering people at work, and then read the final report? Was the report as you saw the event? Was it true? Did something get added or taken away? Was there room for genuine error? If there was, will it ever be corrected? Okay - You'll have noticed that a big US-based mail order firm has just opened a website here in Australia to sell you everything from cosmetics to books to electronic gear. There was a big brouhaha on the news. Part of the fuss was the fear that it would destroy smaller Australian retailers. You'll also have noticed in the last few years that a large New...

I cannot conceal this from you - I adore silver lenses. Whether the finish is chrome, paint, anodised aluminium, or solid sterling silver, I think these optics are absolutely superb. It is prejudice - I acquired a Leica Elmar 2.8 lens with a chrome M2 in 1970 and the experience influenced me ever after. There were some horrible silvers - the collapsible Elmar of the 1950's had a chromed barrel but painted focusing ring and this soon looked sad. There were plain aluminium lenses from East Germany like the Meyer ones from Görlitz that quickly became tawdry. But there were also the Planar and Distagon lenses that fronted the 500-series Hasselblads and they looked magnificent. In my own chosen brand they are also supplying some of their small primes in a chrome finish - 23mm, 35mm, and 50mm so far. I have even seen on-line examples of the Fujifilm 27mm f:2.8 in silver, though whenever it is listed it is sold out. I'll bet it was an exclusively Japanese product. Leica have never given up on the aesthetics of the silver lens. You...

It all got so much easier  - thanks to new advances in technology. The venue was Elizabeth Quay, the event a display called Toyota At the Quay. It was one of four motoring events available on the same day - a case of Perth's feast or famine mentality when it comes to car shows. I chose it as the one closest to home, with the easiest transportation, and no entry fee. Birds aren't the only creatures that go cheap, cheap around here...

Well, it took two or three goes, and several changes of cars and underwear, but I think I have finally been able to set the Fujifilm X-T series cameras in the ring against each other and compelled them to show their best. Remember that this was internal testing - no glorious landscapes or attractive girls to distract the scientist/writer/geek. Nothing but the sound of the air conditioning running and the old-time radio. The X-T10 is my camera. The X-T2 and X-T20 were shop stock. The lenses used - a Tokina 35mm f:2.8 macro in an adapter and the native Fujinon 35mm F1.4 - are my possessions. The 35mm Fujinon is being run without a filter on the front and the lens optimizer turned on. The Tokina and adapter are just whatever they are...

I do love a good boxing match - and look at how well the boxes that house the new Fujifilm X-T2 and X-T20 match! They have been smart enough to put them in a similar outer pack ( with the contents clearly marked so that the sales staff can find them in the dim recesses of the store-room , thank goodness, are you taking notice, Wetzlar? ) for brand unity, but imaginative enough to box the more expensive one in the black and the less expensive one in the white. Both packs are pierced to show the X logo of the marque.   Both packs feature an internal tray for the body and a separate case for all the accessories. They are easy to unpack and easy to pack up again...

Thank you for coming along to the Little Studio and being such a good photographic model. And thank you to all the people at Fujifilm Australia for letting me have time to try out the new GFX50s camera and lenses in the studio environment. It is my preferred milieu because it has controlled lighting and a coffee pot. And once I let the new medium format camera have its head - doing the thing that it does best - it proved to me how good it can be. The tabletop trial was not the thing - this camera needs more space between itself and the subject. It needs to be photographing fabulous detail in faces. And you need to be careful when you let it go - the detail it captures can be marvellous and terrifying at the same time. Dare I say too detailed for some occasions? If your purpose is to flatter your portrait sitters, and you are addicted to f:16 and smaller apertures, be prepared to be surprised. Also be prepared to have the sitters mad at you. You see,...