Fujifilm Tag

This week I got to satisfy my curiosity about the light-titanium coloured Fujifilm X-Pro3 - there was one ready in the sales cabinet in Stirling Street. I popped it out and attached an XF 50mm f:2 R WR lens - one of the silver-finish models. I wanted to see how close the two light colours are. Well, not that close. The phenomenon of a silver-finish body having a different appearance from the lenses that are made to go on it is not just a Fujifilm thing. You can see it with Olympus and other cameras. My dear old Leica M2's chrome finish didn't exactly match the barrel on the 50mm collapsible Elmar back in the day either. The closest I ever saw were actually Kodak Retina Reflex cameras and some Contarex models. If you are afflicted with OCD - Obsessional Chromatic Disorder - you can always opt for plain black for both body and lens. Like Coco Chanel, you'll never be out of fashion. You decide whether the appearance is for you. Be aware that the toughened Duratect finishes are very tough indeed...

Is it the warm nights? The dog howling? The police cars chasing people in the street? Naw. This goes on all the time. Sleep like a log through it all. The real reason for the insomnia is the announcement in the electronic press that Fujifilm have released a new model of their X-100 series - the X-100V. I do not need a new camera. I have five Fujifilm cameras already, and 8 lenses for them. They all work well and do everything I need to do. But they are not doing it all in as compact a package, nor with such sophistication as the new X-100V. The thing has the sort of retro flair that I appreciate and the thought of taking it as the only recording instrument for a trip is very tempting. I'm no X-100 virgin. I owned an X-100 for years and grabbed it as a go-to camera on numerous occasions. The advent of the other 5 bodies gradually edged it out - particularly when I finally had to admit that the 23mm f:2 lens was brilliant at normal distances...

Well, you know me by now. Close-up pictures galore and somewhat of a Fujifilm fanboy, but there are still a lot of things I don't know about the subject or the equipment - and I am driven as much by idle curiosity as by scientific zeal. The good thing about idle curiosity is that you can do it when you're idle...

I hope Fujifilm Australia will forgive me for pinching one of their internet images to accompany this post. I do not have a Fujifilm X-Pro2 camera to hand to illustrate it and my older X-Pro1 model is somewhat different  - but then if you are in the market for the featured product, you'll likely know exactly what an X-Pro2 looks like. Note: I am clutching my X-Pro1 firmly and defending it from all comers. I know it is the first model in this successful series and I know it doesn't have the processing or sensor power of the Pro2 or Pro3, but I love it dearly - it's never failed me in the studio or dance hall. It is the go-to body for the Little Workshop to record aircraft builds...

A recent talk by Warwick Williams introducing a new Fujifilm camera also gave him a chance to mention another very successful Fujifilm product line - their Instax instant printers. Here's one of the Mni Link I found at our Murray Street shop. The construction couldn't be simpler; one slim case in any fashion colour you like, one door to open for the Instax film pack, and one port to charge it from. You send a signal via magic waves from your mobile phone ( and possibly from other devices...

The daughter has just returned from a trip to Japan. It was a short visit, but as she speaks a little of the language, an enjoyable one for her. As it was a quick decision affair, I grabbed one of the spare cameras to send her off with - a dear old Fujifilm X10 that has been serving since 2012. You've seen weblog pictures taken with it years ago here on your screen. My first worry as I sent her off with it was the battery supply - the camera batteries were small in those days and these have aged. But the Fujifilm charger could be configured for the Japanese 117V system and I figured out of five of them, at least two should work. As it happened, they all did, and there was never a time when electricity wasn't available. The second concern was the settings that the camera would shoot with. I dialled up RAW and jpeg initially and then saw that it would eat up a great deal of memory. So I opted for large fine jpeg and then...

And some of us have them in colour. Instax cameras from Fujifilm are often in some pretty fashionable colours - they are primarily sold in Japan and the Japanese people have a surprisingly bright taste in colour. Witness the Shinkansen train in Tokyo station a few years ago as a heading image. And that's just a conservative one - recent pictures my daughter brought home of the Japanese trains shows even brighter and more sylish ones. They're gearing up to make the Olympics look very good. They also gear up with colourful ensembles - cameras and bags to carry them in - and they never forget that you need to tkae a number of Spare Instax film packs as well. You can have your dark moments...