Fuji Tag

Something happened in the Japanese camera industry between the time I was a kid working in a camera shop and now - when I am a geezer working in a camera shop. The wonderful skill of encasing cameras has been lost. Or at least it has been moved elsewhere.When we sold Pentax Spotmatics and Minolta SRT 101 cameras they were always accompanied in their boxes with a standard lens and a leather case. The cases were as sharp as the lenses. The leather work was precise, the fit of the case was tight, and the little details like plush lining and snaps or release fittings were top-quality. These ever-ready cases sometimes meant that the cameras were never ready, but at least they could travel slung around a sweaty tourist neck and protect the contents.Nowadays you get the camera, a handful of cables and an opportunity to go try to find a bag that will fit the damn thing. This is a boon to the bag manufacturers like Think Tank, Lowepro, Tamrac, and Kata and to be fair when you get...

I love new camera day because I get to play with the toys before anyone else does. I have long passed my excitement point when it comes to point and shoot equipment and even the latest daguerreotype studio camera on the mahogany stand gets just a passing glance before we wrap it and put it in a post-pak for shipment to the South-west. Same old, same old. What DO they do with all those studio cameras down in Bridgetown? And the Klieg lights?And the crates of mortar shells?But today I get to have fun - the new Fuji X-E1 has arrived. I'm a Fuji fan as it is, owning an X 10, and I have long been impressed with their innovative approach to equipment. The X100 and the X-Pro1 sold well and led to a lot of professional photographers re-discovering the truly portable digital camera. They were not disappointed with the results - these cameras use the full APSC-size sensor and their optics and electronics are finely tuned to match the sensor.But at last we have the new X-E1. If...

Every so often the Future calls.When it is being polite, it arrives in the morning, takes off its hat, makes its way around the drawing room, and then leaves after twenty minutes. If I am not at home it leaves a card on a silver tray in the hallway. The visits are refined and pleasant.When it is being vulgar, it heaves a rock through the front window with a note attached. Sometimes the note is flaming.Today's visit was from the Fujifilm representatives - who very kindly brought samples of the new cameras that have just been released at Photokina. We were able to see and operate the XF1 and the X-E1 and compare them to the X-Pro1. In addition we got news about firmware updates for the current series of Fujifilm cameras.Well, I am impressed with the X-E1. Smaller body than the X-Pro1 and a totally electronic viewfinder as opposed to the hybrid electronic/optical type, but the same well-disposed controls and the same brilliant sensor. It shares the lens mount so all the current lenses will fit, as well as...

It is easy to get the latest rumour from the internet - just log on and click over to whatever site you favour. You'll be told the entire and complete truth straight from the enthusiast's mouth. And you can trust these rumours explicitly - or is that implicitly - whatever, as soon as you read something on the internet you are entitled to ring up a shop and ask when it is coming in and whether they price match on it. Doesn't matter if it is a new camera body or a used locomotive - as soon as the idea of it hits a keyboard somewhere in Malaya, it is assumed to be in stock, in several colours, discounted heavily with a free memory card and a tripod if possible...

No one can really predict the future of technology - think of all those magazines in 1948 that had you flying to work in a car with folding wings and hopping down to the supermarket in a jet suit. Remember when your new vehicle was going to be gliding along automatic highways while you played cards - under a perspex dome? Sound like the trip to Joondalup at 5:45?  Ha ha ha.Likewise with cameras. Digital? What's digital? Ahem...

It has finally arrived - rain. Time to consider what to do with your photography for the next three months:1.   Stay inside and drink.2.   Go outside and take pictures.3.   Bring your waterlogged equipment in to the repair department and hope it can be rescued.Assuming that you won't be permitted to do the first, and you would like to avoid the third, give a thought to some of the products that we stock designed to cope with wet weather.If you are going to be outdoors in intermittent showers or mist, good camera and lens protection can be had with flexible hoods and pouches made by Op/Tech, Aquatech,Think Tank,or Kata. They range in price, durability, and complexity from simple plastic bag sleeves to fitted raincoats that cover arms, flashes, and long tele lenses. The really cheap ones are really cheap and are a good insurance policy for landscape shooters. The expensive ones are intended for working sports pros or wildlife photographers who might be standing in a drizzle for hours. Of course those of us who have elected to stay inside and...

Good news for travellers who plan to go and dance upon the green in the northern hemisphere to celebrate May - and equally good news if you plan to stay home and dance on the brown. Camera Electronic has a special on the new Fuji X-Pro1 camera kits so you can capture the action in the best possible style.The Fuji X-Pro1 is one of the most elegant and capable digital cameras on the market right now. Its size is reminiscent of the 35mm camera of twenty years ago but the styling and functionality are absolutely up to date - I suspect they will set the pace for a long time to come. When you use it the controls you need really do fall right to the place you need them, and the result is there is no barrier between you and the picture you see.Look though that big bright viewfinder on the northwest corner - no squashing your nose on the LCD screen - and no matter which of the Fuji lenses you have on - 18mm, 35mm, or 60mm...

Are you still hungry for landscape photography? Well remember that Greg Hocking will be conducting a course on Low Light Landscapes with the Shoot Workshops on the 6th of May - so you still have time to ring Shoot or go to their website and book yourself in. Greg is the business - he has won numerous awards and contracts for his landscape work and you could not do better than be instructed by him.That said - here's my second installment of landscape photography advice, chiefly orientated to equipment choice rather than technique.If I want bigger pictures or more detailed pictures than those available from my Fuji X-10 I need to grab a different outfit from the ready-use locker. I know that I will be wanting to see wide views, but there may be some small portions of the scene that reward me with mini-scapes or telling details - so I know I'll need a variety of focal lengths to cater for whatever presents itself.I grab my Nikon D300, an 18-200 Nikon lens, and an 8-16 Sigma lens. In the...

As promised, a very personal view of landscape photography. Maybe not what Greg Hocking will recommend when he runs his low-light landscape course at Shoot Photography, but then he's an expert and I'm not. Still...