Epson Tag

If you’re looking for the ideal home photography project, look no further than scanning and printing from the comfort of your own home. If you’ve been at the game long enough or are new to film photography, chances are you have dozens of film negatives lying around. Regardless of them being from decades ago or last week, wouldn’t you love to scan and print these at home? Take your film photography to the ultimate level by scanning negatives, managing them as digital files, and printing them.    Scans To Last a Lifetime   While photo labs can do this for you overnight, it takes time to post your negatives in and receive your prints back. Plus, you have no creative control over the process. And what if you only want the one high-quality print from a roll of film? The answer is to use a high-end film scanner to digitise your analogue film. With the right scanner, you can digitise 35mm and 120 films into files that can be loaded into Adobe Photoshop, Lightroom or your software of choice.     Epson Perfection V850 Pro Scanner   The folks...

Every time I go wandering through Camera Electronic I find something more that I want. This is pleasant but dangerous - it can disturb the even flow of my bank account and cause me to look upon my present equipment with a jaded eye. I'm reasonably safe in the camera section right now as I seem to have the camera bodies and lenses that will do the things I want to do. I have my desires, of course, and review the announcements from my chosen manufacturer with close attention. Who knows when a pleasant surprise will appear on the horizon...

I'm great at making my mind up about things, as long as I can dislike them. Negativity is one of my positive traits - it lets me know where I don't want to go and what I don't want to do. I generally discover these two things after I've gone there and done them. Sometimes it's nice to make a change and find out the good stuff rather than the bad - and in the back end of the Stirling Street shop is a rack of producs that will let me do just that - the sample paper packs. I was drawn to this familiar area the other week by the two green packets you see here: They are made of unusual materials - hemp and cotton in one case and agave in the other. Both are listed on their respective packets as fast growing, sustainable, and renewable - an important thought for some photographers. You get three A4 sheets in each packet to to test with colour or monochrome printing. Quite apart from the economic and political aspects of this, they...

As a long-time user of Epson inkjet printers I have been somewhat cynical about my relationship with them. I started out with a biggie - a 3800 model that would print A2 sizes. It was a marvellous machine for some time but my own neglect of it eventually spelled doom. I failed to cycle and exercise it enough and eventually one of the channels in the inkjet head blocked irretrievably. I could do nothing with it and gave it away to someone who only wanted to print monochromes with it. They may still have it, and good luck to them. Chastened by my experience, I bought another - a smaller model that only goes to A3+ size. I've exercised it weekly since purchase and have saved it from complete blockage. But there are times when the jets do clog and there are procedures needed to clean them. However, when all is going well, the results from it are all that I could ever want - and all that the people who receive my prints could ever want as well. The secrets seem to...

When I was working behind the counter at CE - fitfully, I hasten to add - I was often tasked with the job of setting out the inks for the printers. We carried a number of the Epson models - still do - and it was a precision task to match the various supplies with the printers. Fortunately Epson was pretty good about colour-coding the boxes - less so about the various sub-variants of ink. You had to read the label carefully to see if it was the right number. The Epson Ultrachrome inks are actually wonderful. When I set my R 3000 printer correctly, load my paper correctly, and get the computer to correctly send a signal ( Three correctlies in a row...

https://www.cameraelectronic.com.au/epson-perfection-v850-pro-scanner Our current circumstances of lockdown have prompted a lot of photographers to set about scanning their previous analog work and converting it to digital storage - the writer of this newsletter amongst them. I've used an older model of the Epson V-Series flatbed scanners for well over a decade and it has proved to be an invaluable part of the studio. Prior to my digital training at Camera Electronic I shot on many different film cameras with many different sizes of film;35mm, 6x4.5, 6x6, 6x7...

You'll have to refer back to previous columns to see how the digitising of the slide collection started - the equipment and the discoveries. It is still going steadily, and this apparently is a good thing - a number of photography advice sites say that establishing a routine during a lock-down is a good method of maintaining sanity. I'm not sure if sanity and slide digitising in the same sentence is realistic, but so far I haven't heard voices. The silver elephant in the room is not actually colour slides - it's negatives. I started making these seriously in 1965 and that's not an inappropriate word. After serious came chronic, then grim, and it got worse before it got better. I was a person with money to buy a variety of films - and this meant that I chopped and changed about in emulsions all the time. The driving force was not necessity or skill - it was novelty and the blandishments of the advertisements in POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY and MODERN PHOTOGRAPHY. It was exactly analogous to the business of continuously switching powders,...