depth of field Tag

Photographers who may find themselves confined to their home for some time due to various reasons - illness, financial straits, or a court order, for instance - can still have a lot of fun and learn many new facts by resorting to their computer and the resources of the internet. We'll leave aside the visual temptations of Icker, Monstagram, or any of the other purely presentational sites and direct you to technical ones. I mean, beautiful images are all very well for the professionals, but when you come right down to it, the amateur photographer wants specifications and technical comparisons, eh? So today's site is Dofmaster. Go to dofmaster.com and look at the variety of products you can get for your information devices. They do a number of electronic programs for the different forms of mobile phone or tablet and for the fixed computers. You can pop right into the depth of field calculator and experiment with the idea before you commit to anything. I use the free bit all the time to compare and contrast different lenses. The idea is you...

I rarely enquire into other people's relationships - they are none of my business. Some photographers feel the same way about taking other people's images - they never approach closely. This is neither a good thing nor a bad one - it is just the way some people's personalities deal with the world. If you are one of these shooters you may choose a longer lens for your year's work. Something that allows you to put a distance between yourself and the subject. You'll have good and bad: Good a. There will be less interference between you and your subject. They will be less likely to react to you. There will be less fear on both parts. b. The depth of field for any given aperture will be shallower. If you are trying to isolate your subject with a fuzzy background or foreground, this will happen more readily. c. The background will loom larger in the shot  - good if this is the atmosphere you want. d. You'll get less chromatic aberration at the edges of most pictures. e. Your face shots will show less distortion than...

The camera is an excuse to get out the toy cars and the toy cars are an excuse to get out the camera. It is probably the same with you - substituting landscapes or sports or wildflowers for toy cars. You might even be the family photographer who is always circulating at the parties. If you are, take heart - they may growl at you now when you make them look at the camera, but after a couple of decades those images will become precious. Just make sure you save the files in a number of places. If family members have been particularly un-cooperative at the holiday parties or weddings you can get your revenge later by Facebooking the worst of them and then demanding a ransom to hide them. You're the photographer and you get to be ruthless. The main feature that stands out in the new Olympus OM-D E-M10 Mark III besides a model designation  that is far too long, is the improved user control system. Oh, they've added a bit more grip and a few more internal features with...

The whole idea of taking pictures of toy cars - or silverware, jewellery, football fields, etc. - for illustration is to show all of the subject in focus. And to show some part of the surroundings in focus as well. Oh, it is fashionable to have one eye on a bride and groom in focus and everything else fuzzy - the same applies to kittens - and it is easy to get things fuzzy on kittens. But when you are selling something people want to see how good it is rather than how arty you are, and they want to see it all over. Thus the fight on the tabletop for every millimetre of sharpness. The optical facts of life say depth of field is greater with a shorter focal length and this applies to little lenses as well as big ones. The rules that smaller apertures produce more DOF and that moving closer reduces the DOF also stay. It is a balancing act. So far, I have found that, for my purposes, the act balances better with an APS-C sensor. Now...