Cullmann Tag

This is an extra late-night bonus weblog post for Tuesday, the 29th of November. The heading picture shows what was happening in the Stirling Street store this morning at about 11:00.I recognise the activity. The staff are either setting out a stack of Cullmann tripods for a once-in-a-lifetime clearance sale or are constructing an anti-aircraft mounting for a Lewis gun. Given that this is one of centennial years of WW1 either conclusion is possible.If you need a tripod for your DSLR or mirror-less camera at a bargain price, or would just like a shot at a passing Halberstadt you should repair to 230 Stirling Street early in the morning and get in while the getting is good.I use a Concept 622T tripod with my Fujifilm outfits and it has been one of the best purchases of my digital career. I note there are some of them in the stack and also some of their heavier brothers. No idea what the prices are likely to be but they are going to go and the people they go to are going to...

Getting some help in the studio when you are tackling product shots can be nerve wracking. You have to advertise the position, read the resumés, conduct interviews, choose a candidate, fill out the tax file and workers comp forms, and then wonder whether they are going to show up on time.Some days you wonder whether they are ever going stop talking, or eating, or go home...

It costs $49 and it has three legs and you need one in your car right now. And you can't get it at Marlowes.This is not a column about studio shooting with tripods. The one you see in the pictures would be awful in a studio. If that is what you are looking for, go look through the Cullmann, Gitzo, and Manfrotto tripod range and look for the big, heavy ones - the heavier the better.This is about a small, boxed $ 49 aluminium tripod that is light enough and cheap enough to live in the box in the boot of your car. Cause one day you gonna get caught...

I often wonder if Manfrotto make one of everything. Their catalogs are one of the most comprehensive and well-organised documents for any shop. Of course this stuff is accessible on the net, but what a pleasure to see a well-printed book that you can refer to instantly for camera support or light support.A particular pleasure has been the Manfrotto practise of numbering their equipment simply and then organising a number index in the back of the book. If they have been wise enough to number the goods clearly - with a number that doesn't peel off - then the whole process of sales is much easier.A small cavil; of late the simple numbering system that prevailed a few years ago in the tripod section has given way to complex codes. We could sort out " 055 " pretty well...

We sell tripods. And we sell tripod accessories; plates for the top, ballheads for the middle, and spiked feet for the bottom. Occasionally we sell a tripod bag, but sometimes I wonder why - and other times I wonder why we do not sell one with each tripod.The bag has two main functions : One; it lets you carry a tripod that is bigger than necessary a longer distance than you need to - and without dislocating your shoulder. Two; it disguises your tripod on the tarmac as you look out of the airplane window and the fuel tanker runs over it.This is the same with golf bags, but with them you can at least wear funny jumpers and spend the late afternoon drinking - with landscape photography you need to be alert for the magic minutes of dying sunlight over the seashore or silos. Tripod bags are altogether soberer items.Manfrotto make them with a startling ends for the three-way heads that go on their large tripods. As these three-way heads are most useful for landscapers this is the choice...